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Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
ringing in their ears a fitting requiem. This terrible war demands cruel sacrifices. The noblest and the best freely offer up their lives to it. Let us hope that as Stonewall Jackson's memory is illustrated forever by the glorious victory of Chancellorsville, so the death of this young Virginian hero will hereafter record another, and even a more decisive triumph, and that the final despair of the North will date from the fierce struggle now disfiguring the valleys and the woodlands of Spotsylvania. We have said that James E. B. Stuart was a warrior by instinct, and his whole life shows it. He was a born soldier. From his youth he was noted for a daring enthusiasm which gave promise of what the man would be; and his genius soon showed itself, even in the limited sphere afforded by the wilds of New Mexico. It was in 1854 that young Stuart received his commission in the United States army as second lieutenant in a mounted rifle corps. A year later he was transferred to the first
pture of a number of prisoners, the destruction of vast stores of supplies and arms, and the transfer to Virginia of two or three thousand valuable horses. By this time, however, the Yankees had taken a lesson from Stuart's successes, and had raised a considerable cavalry force. Well mounted and equipped, the Federal troops made up in numbers what they wanted in the qualities of good cavalry soldiers; and henceforth the work of Stuart was more confined to the ordinary duties of cavalry in European wars—to the protection of the flanks of the main army. In the years 1863 and 1864 he had plenty to do. By degrees the Federals had got together a considerable force, and Burford, Kilpatrick and Pleasanton were commanders not to be despised. Still, on all occasions, Stuart with inferior forces held his own, and often inflicted considerable damage on the invaders. During the winter of 1863 and the early months of the present year, he had been engaged in organizing his force for the campaig
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
of men, and inspiring their followers with the same confidence and devotion, they trod the same path, fought the same fight, and have shared the same fate—struck down in the front of the battle at the moment of victory, with the cheers of triumph ringing in their ears a fitting requiem. This terrible war demands cruel sacrifices. The noblest and the best freely offer up their lives to it. Let us hope that as Stonewall Jackson's memory is illustrated forever by the glorious victory of Chancellorsville, so the death of this young Virginian hero will hereafter record another, and even a more decisive triumph, and that the final despair of the North will date from the fierce struggle now disfiguring the valleys and the woodlands of Spotsylvania. We have said that James E. B. Stuart was a warrior by instinct, and his whole life shows it. He was a born soldier. From his youth he was noted for a daring enthusiasm which gave promise of what the man would be; and his genius soon showed i
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
e which had been assigned to us. At the same time the enemy opened a brisk cannonade, which lasted only a few minutes. Evidently he was already up and getting ready for that battle which was to make the 13th of December, 1862, so memorable. Of the 190,000 men thus awakened before the sun had risen, 2, 145 were going to die before that sun would set. Our six guns had been posted in extended order. One was placed on Marye's Hill, immediately on the left of the plank road leading to Fredericksburg. Immediately on the right of that road stood our old friends, the Washington Artillery. About four hundred yards to the left was our Gun No. 4. This gun was a United States three-inch rifle, captured in one of the battles around Richmond. It still bore, written on its stock, the name of General George A. McCall, who was made prisoner in the same battle, together with many of his men. The pit in which this gun had been placed was on the crest of a hill projecting considerably in
Rockbridge (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
help us take out the gun, and who stood by us all the while, cheering us with his presence and his words, the Donaldsonville Artillery owes much of the honor which this action added to its name. After all, history and official reports to the contrary notwithstanding, we did not dislodge that enemy, who only hugged the ground more closely and stole away after dark. If we did not succeed, we had the satisfaction of having tried. R. Prosper Landry. J. E. B. Stuart. [from the Rockbridge county news, November 28, 1895.] [The following tribute to General Stuart appeared in the London Index soon after his death. It is republished now in the County News, by request, from a copy of the original paper.] Since the death of Stonewall Jackson, the Confederacy has sustained no heavier loss than has befallen her in the untimely close of the brilliant career of Major-General James E. B. Stuart. No two men could have been more opposite types of the soldier—Jackson, the earnest,
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
and it may be doubted whether the dashing cavalry raid or the brilliant infantry attack had more to do with the successful result. Later in the same year Stuart performed a still greater feat. Whilst McClellan was pursuing Lee southward after the battle of Antietam creek, Stuart, with 2,000 picked troopers and half a dozen light guns, stole round the right wing of the Federals, crossed the Potomac a little north of Williamsport, entered Maryland, passed rapidly through Mercersburg and Chambersburg, and finally recrossed the Potomac about fifteen miles from Washington, far to the left of McClellan's army, with the loss of one killed and seven wounded. The result of his raid was the capture of a number of prisoners, the destruction of vast stores of supplies and arms, and the transfer to Virginia of two or three thousand valuable horses. By this time, however, the Yankees had taken a lesson from Stuart's successes, and had raised a considerable cavalry force. Well mounted and equip
Mercersburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
truck the blow, and it may be doubted whether the dashing cavalry raid or the brilliant infantry attack had more to do with the successful result. Later in the same year Stuart performed a still greater feat. Whilst McClellan was pursuing Lee southward after the battle of Antietam creek, Stuart, with 2,000 picked troopers and half a dozen light guns, stole round the right wing of the Federals, crossed the Potomac a little north of Williamsport, entered Maryland, passed rapidly through Mercersburg and Chambersburg, and finally recrossed the Potomac about fifteen miles from Washington, far to the left of McClellan's army, with the loss of one killed and seven wounded. The result of his raid was the capture of a number of prisoners, the destruction of vast stores of supplies and arms, and the transfer to Virginia of two or three thousand valuable horses. By this time, however, the Yankees had taken a lesson from Stuart's successes, and had raised a considerable cavalry force. Well
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
and manly figure, his easy carriage and fine seat, his never-failing spirits, his personal gallantry, his daring enthusiasm, his unfailing devotion, endeared him to his men and all who knew him. They will hear no more the ringing charge that made every man of them grip his saddle more closely and clench his hand more firmly on his sword hilt. They will never see again the gleaming blade that so often led them safely through the thickest of the fight. But his memory will be one more prize to the chivalry of the South, and his loss will be avenged. But somewhere in Virginia there is a home that will know this fearless soldier no more, and there will be sorrow that cannot be comforted. God grant that the days of peace be not far distant and that the blood of this Virginian here, sprung from a race of kings, and in his death worthily redeeming the splendid memories of an ancient dynasty, has not been poured out in vain. [From the Richmond (Va.) Dispatch, January 26—February 2, 1896
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
hole life shows it. He was a born soldier. From his youth he was noted for a daring enthusiasm which gave promise of what the man would be; and his genius soon showed itself, even in the limited sphere afforded by the wilds of New Mexico. It was in 1854 that young Stuart received his commission in the United States army as second lieutenant in a mounted rifle corps. A year later he was transferred to the first regular cavalry, with General Johnston, now commanding the Confederate army in Georgia, as his lieutenant-colonel, and Sumner, who died lately in the Federal service as colonel. Under him, now fighting with tribes of hostile Indians, now beating up groups of marauding banditti, Stuart laid the foundation of that reputation as a dashing cavalry officer which he has since established on the plains of his native State. And amongst the officers of that famous regiment there is many a tradition of Stuart's bold riding and dashing charges. When the present war broke out he cease
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
le which was to make the 13th of December, 1862, so memorable. Of the 190,000 men thus awakened before the sun had risen, 2, 145 were going to die before that sun would set. Our six guns had been posted in extended order. One was placed on Marye's Hill, immediately on the left of the plank road leading to Fredericksburg. Immediately on the right of that road stood our old friends, the Washington Artillery. About four hundred yards to the left was our Gun No. 4. This gun was a United States three-inch rifle, captured in one of the battles around Richmond. It still bore, written on its stock, the name of General George A. McCall, who was made prisoner in the same battle, together with many of his men. The pit in which this gun had been placed was on the crest of a hill projecting considerably in advance of a straight continuation of our line. Between this hill and the town the ground was boggy, and there was no infantry nor artillery in our immediate front—nothing but
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