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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
r performed by Colonel Munford and his command was in manual labor, required in hauling the cannon out of the wreck, securing the horses, etc. Had the other cavalry leaders exhibited the same energy, daring, and enterprise which characterized Captain Scott, it is not at all improbable that the cavalry arm of the service alone might have ridden to Washington that night. But satisfied with what had been done, the army remained quiescent. * * * W. F. R. Reply of General Munford. Lynchburg, Va., December 22, 1895. To the Editor of the Dispatch: Your last Sunday's [December 15] paper contained a brief communication from Colonel John Scott, of Fauquier, enclosing a long letter to the latter from W. F. R., dated Greenville, August, 1895. This letter of W. F. R. seems to be in reply to one from Colonel Scott, soliciting W. F. R.'s opinion of my official report of the participation of my command at the First Battle of Manassas. A reference to my report at page 534, of Series
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
ehind to work with the guns and secure horses, saddles, and other plunder. We joined Captain Scott on the other side of the run, and continued our wild ride faster than ever. We soon came to the foot of the hill upon which the little town of Centreville is situated. Crossing a small stream at the base, we rode rapidly up the slope, and on the crown of the hill came in immediate contact with a long, blue line of Federal infantry, drawn up in battle array. Riding up close to them, Captain Scot the whole fire of perhaps three hundred infantry. Not a man, however, was hurt, and we were soon out of sight, hidden by the shades of night. A whole Brigade. I ascertained afterwards that the troops we encountered on the heights of Centreville were a brigade, under Colonel Miles, which had never been in the fight, but had been left to cover the retreat of the Federal army. With reference to the capture of the artillery and spoil at Cuban Run bridge, the assertion that any command
Gainsville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
eyes, stern and silent, awaiting the catastrophe, and rendered rather more conspicuous by a white handkerchief wound around his left hand, which had been slightly wounded by a bullet. Such the situation. Such was the situation when looking to our left. On the right flank of the Federal advance, and a little in its rear, we saw the gleam of bayonets on the crest of the hills. It was but a single brigade—3,000 strong—led by Kirby Smith, who, hearing the steady firing from the cars at Gainsville, had come across the country straight for the battle field. As the brigade poured over the crest of the hill the pace was quickened to a double-quick, rushing down on the enemy's flank, firing and shouting as they came. The Federal line halted, then wavered, wheeling a little to the right, as if to meet this fresh enemy, but their hearts seemed to fail them before that onward rush, and the right of the line began to crumble like a rope of sand. Then it was that I saw Jackson raise his w
Greenville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
h: The subjoined letter, which I request you to publish in your widespread and metropolitan journal, is from the pen of Captain William Fitzhugh Randolph, of Greenville, Miss. Captain Randolph, himself a gallant Confederate officer, is brother to Bishop Randolph, of Virginia, and of the military stock of the distinguished Capta the cavalry corps attached to the Army of Northern Virginia. Yours, John Scott, of Fauquier, Colonel of Cavalry, Confederate States Army. Warrenton, Va. Greenville, August, 1895. Colonel John Scott: My dear Colonel,—I hope you will excuse the delay which has occurred in my answer to your letter, received some weeks ago,st Sunday's [December 15] paper contained a brief communication from Colonel John Scott, of Fauquier, enclosing a long letter to the latter from W. F. R., dated Greenville, August, 1895. This letter of W. F. R. seems to be in reply to one from Colonel Scott, soliciting W. F. R.'s opinion of my official report of the participation
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
of Captain William Fitzhugh Randolph, of Greenville, Miss. Captain Randolph, himself a gallant Confederate officer, is brother to Bishop Randolph, of Virginia, and of the military stock of the distinguished Captain Buckner Magill Randolph, of the Confederate infantry, as well as kinsman to the courageous and accomplished Colonel Robert Randolph, of the cavalry corps attached to the Army of Northern Virginia. Yours, John Scott, of Fauquier, Colonel of Cavalry, Confederate States Army. Warrenton, Va. Greenville, August, 1895. Colonel John Scott: My dear Colonel,—I hope you will excuse the delay which has occurred in my answer to your letter, received some weeks ago, which has been occasioned, first, by my absence from home, and then by a spell of fever, from which I have only recovered in the past few days. The extract which you give from Colonel Munford's report (see for the report itself, page 534, Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series 1, Vol. Ii) i
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
urnal, is from the pen of Captain William Fitzhugh Randolph, of Greenville, Miss. Captain Randolph, himself a gallant Confederate officer, is brother to Bishop Randolph, of Virginia, and of the military stock of the distinguished Captain Buckner Magill Randolph, of the Confederate infantry, as well as kinsman to the courageous and accomplished Colonel Robert Randolph, of the cavalry corps attached to the Army of Northern Virginia. Yours, John Scott, of Fauquier, Colonel of Cavalry, Confederate States Army. Warrenton, Va. Greenville, August, 1895. Colonel John Scott: My dear Colonel,—I hope you will excuse the delay which has occurred in my answer to your letter, received some weeks ago, which has been occasioned, first, by my absence from home, and then by a spell of fever, from which I have only recovered in the past few days. The extract which you give from Colonel Munford's report (see for the report itself, page 534, Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies
Fauquier (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
distinguished Captain Buckner Magill Randolph, of the Confederate infantry, as well as kinsman to the courageous and accomplished Colonel Robert Randolph, of the cavalry corps attached to the Army of Northern Virginia. Yours, John Scott, of Fauquier, Colonel of Cavalry, Confederate States Army. Warrenton, Va. Greenville, August, 1895. Colonel John Scott: My dear Colonel,—I hope you will excuse the delay which has occurred in my answer to your letter, received some weeks ago, which has army remained quiescent. * * * W. F. R. Reply of General Munford. Lynchburg, Va., December 22, 1895. To the Editor of the Dispatch: Your last Sunday's [December 15] paper contained a brief communication from Colonel John Scott, of Fauquier, enclosing a long letter to the latter from W. F. R., dated Greenville, August, 1895. This letter of W. F. R. seems to be in reply to one from Colonel Scott, soliciting W. F. R.'s opinion of my official report of the participation of my command
Kirby Smith (search for this): chapter 1.23
ckson stood near his brigade, with cap drawn close over his eyes, stern and silent, awaiting the catastrophe, and rendered rather more conspicuous by a white handkerchief wound around his left hand, which had been slightly wounded by a bullet. Such the situation. Such was the situation when looking to our left. On the right flank of the Federal advance, and a little in its rear, we saw the gleam of bayonets on the crest of the hills. It was but a single brigade—3,000 strong—led by Kirby Smith, who, hearing the steady firing from the cars at Gainsville, had come across the country straight for the battle field. As the brigade poured over the crest of the hill the pace was quickened to a double-quick, rushing down on the enemy's flank, firing and shouting as they came. The Federal line halted, then wavered, wheeling a little to the right, as if to meet this fresh enemy, but their hearts seemed to fail them before that onward rush, and the right of the line began to crumble lik
Thomas T. Munford (search for this): chapter 1.23
vered in the past few days. The extract which you give from Colonel Munford's report (see for the report itself, page 534, Official Recordf the capture is due. The only part in the affair performed by Colonel Munford and his command was in manual labor, required in hauling the cdone, the army remained quiescent. * * * W. F. R. Reply of General Munford. Lynchburg, Va., December 22, 1895. To the Editor of thommand, in connection with that made by the command under Lieutenant-Colonel Munford, composed of Captains W. H. Payne, Ball, Langhorne, and Hvolunteers from his regiment to the bridge, where I found Lieutenant-Colonel Munford, with a portion of the Virginia cavalry, extricating thesed firing. Here I remained until 10 o'clock at night, aiding Colonel Munford, when I returned to camp. I have ever deemed it an unseemlyination of one another, and shall content myself with the above response to the criticism of Free Lance. Respectfully, Thomas T. Munford.
Archie Smith (search for this): chapter 1.23
etreating, had come in a special car from Richmond, and had just ridden upon the field. Captain Davis, at the head of the Albemarle Troop of cavalry, rode up the hill, and was immediately ordered in pursuit. As the troop was passing near me, Archie Smith, of Winchester, a member of the company, and a near relative, called to me to join them, which I was very glad to do. We passed close to Mr. Davis, with the two Generals, who raised their caps to us, and giving them a rousing cheer, we rode onoo great for the average cavalryman, and Captain Davis himself, with most of his men, dismounted and commenced work on the tangled wreck. I myself was about to dismount, having an eye on a fine McClelland saddle which I wanted to secure, when Archie Smith, who was still at my side, turned to me and said: Yonder goes the White havelock, Will! All right, I replied, and we dashed after Captain Scott, who was crossing the stream above the wreck and debris, waving to the men to follow him. About fi
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