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Caldwell (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
is act: A woman was working in a field, near Holman's ford, having a child with her. The child climbed on the fence, and the men began to shoot at it, and finally killed it. Emboldened by their success in Wilkes county, they made a raid into Caldwell county on the 7th of May. Major Harvey Bingham, with about a half a dozen young men from Caldwell and Watauga counties, attempted to rout these murderers from their stronghold at Fort Hamby. One Sunday night, after their raid into Caldwell, Major BCaldwell and Watauga counties, attempted to rout these murderers from their stronghold at Fort Hamby. One Sunday night, after their raid into Caldwell, Major Bingham made a well-planned move on the fort, at a late hour of the night. For some reason, Wade and his men were not aware of the approach of Bingham's men until they had entered the house. Wade and his men announced their defenceless condition, and begged for their lives. No guns were seen, and they were, so Bingham believed, his prisoners. They gave Wade and his men time to dress, after which, at a moment when the captors were off their guard, they rushed to their guns which were concealed
Lenoir, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
e that these depredations would be discontinued, but they were not. These marauders were divided into two bands. One, led by Simmons, had its headquarters in the Brushy Mountains, and the other, led by Wade, had its headquarters near the Yadkin river, in Wilkes county. The bands at times operated together, but it is principally with Wade's band that this article is to deal. The house which Wade had chosen and fortified was situated near the road which leads from Wilkesboro to Lenoir, in Caldwell county, and about a mile from Holman's Ford, where the valley road crosses the Yadkin river. The house was situated on a high hill, commanding a fine view of the Yadkin valley, and of the valley road for a distance of a mile above and a mile below the ford. The house fronted the river on the south, while the rear was protected by the Flat Woods belt, in which there were sympathizers, if not aiders and abettors, of the band. From this position the Yadkin valley and the surrounding count
Iredell (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
fire from the fort the men were compelled to leave the bodies of Linney and Brown. Wade's men afterwards buried them near the fort. These men returned to Alexander county and raised a large company, a strong force having been brought from Iredell county under the command of Wallace Sharpe. On Wednesday the force started towards Fort Hamby. After crossing Cove's Gap a courier was sent back to Iredell county to request Captain Cowan to raise a company and come to their assistance; also anothIredell county to request Captain Cowan to raise a company and come to their assistance; also another courier was sent to Statesville to an encampment of Federal soldiers to inform them of the condition of things and to ask their assistance. Before reaching Moravian Falls they received a message from Wade, saying: Come on, I am looking for you; I can whip a thousand of you. It was dark when Holman's Ford was reached. Some one in the woods before the company ordered them to halt. The men thought that the order was from some of Wade's band and were about to fire upon them, when it was found
Statesville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
Wallace Sharpe. On Wednesday the force started towards Fort Hamby. After crossing Cove's Gap a courier was sent back to Iredell county to request Captain Cowan to raise a company and come to their assistance; also another courier was sent to Statesville to an encampment of Federal soldiers to inform them of the condition of things and to ask their assistance. Before reaching Moravian Falls they received a message from Wade, saying: Come on, I am looking for you; I can whip a thousand of you. him the soldiers had frequently come within six feet of him. On the way back to Alexander county Captain Cowan, from Iredell, was met with a small body of men on their way to Fort Hamby. Also a company of Federal troops, then stationed in Statesville, were met on their way to the fort. They were told what had been done. The captain ordered three cheers, which the men gave with a good will. (Dr. W C. Green.) The bodies of Linney and Brown were brought back home for final burial. Th
Deep Gap (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
Hamby a terror in all the surrounding country, Professor Flowers is well qualified to write its history, and the Observer thanks him for his cheerful compliance with its request to furnish it for publication a copy of his paper. The story it tells so well is one of thrilling interest, and once begun, will be eagerly followed to the end. Fort Hamby. In March, 1865, General Stoneman left East Tennessee, moving by the turnpike leading from Taylorsville, Tenn., through Watauga county to Deep Gap, on the Blue Ridge. On the 26th of March he entered Boone, N. C., and on the 27th the column was divided, one division under General Stoneman marching towards Wilkesboro, while the other, under General Gillam, crossed the Blue Ridge at Blowing Rock and went to Patterson, in Caldwell county, and then joined Stoneman at Wilkesboro. Leaving Wilkesboro on the 31st, General Stoneman moved over into Surry county, going towards Mt. Airy. During the march through this section of the State, Stone
Boone, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
is well qualified to write its history, and the Observer thanks him for his cheerful compliance with its request to furnish it for publication a copy of his paper. The story it tells so well is one of thrilling interest, and once begun, will be eagerly followed to the end. Fort Hamby. In March, 1865, General Stoneman left East Tennessee, moving by the turnpike leading from Taylorsville, Tenn., through Watauga county to Deep Gap, on the Blue Ridge. On the 26th of March he entered Boone, N. C., and on the 27th the column was divided, one division under General Stoneman marching towards Wilkesboro, while the other, under General Gillam, crossed the Blue Ridge at Blowing Rock and went to Patterson, in Caldwell county, and then joined Stoneman at Wilkesboro. Leaving Wilkesboro on the 31st, General Stoneman moved over into Surry county, going towards Mt. Airy. During the march through this section of the State, Stoneman's men committed many depredations, and after leaving Wilkesb
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
, as nearly in strict conformity to military usage as these old Confederate soldiers, under the excitement of the occasion, could conform to. After the prisoners were shot, the fort was set on fire. When the flames reached the cellar, the firing of guns was like a hot skirmish. Wade's men had stored away a great many loaded guns and a large quantity of ammunition. Wade was seen in the vicinity several days after. He claimed to have been a major in Stonemen's command and a native of Michigan. He said that he had escaped to the Yadkin river from the fort and had hid under the banks until night; that in searching for him the soldiers had frequently come within six feet of him. On the way back to Alexander county Captain Cowan, from Iredell, was met with a small body of men on their way to Fort Hamby. Also a company of Federal troops, then stationed in Statesville, were met on their way to the fort. They were told what had been done. The captain ordered three cheers, which
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
The story of a House which deserters from Stoneman's army occupied and fortified, and from which they sallied forth and Ravaged the surrounding Country—four lives lost in the effort to dislodge Them—the House finally fired and four of the desperadoes caught and Shot— the leader, however, unfortunately Escapes—a thrilling Recital. Professor R. L. Flowers, of Trinity College, read before the last meeting of the Historical Society of that Institution a paper on Fort Hamby—a piece of North Carolina post war history. A native of one of the counties scourged by the miscreants who made the name of Fort Hamby a terror in all the surrounding country, Professor Flowers is well qualified to write its history, and the Observer thanks him for his cheerful compliance with its request to furnish it for publication a copy of his paper. The story it tells so well is one of thrilling interest, and once begun, will be eagerly followed to the end. Fort Hamby. In March, 1865, General Sto
Caldwell, Noble County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
is shown by this act: A woman was working in a field, near Holman's ford, having a child with her. The child climbed on the fence, and the men began to shoot at it, and finally killed it. Emboldened by their success in Wilkes county, they made a raid into Caldwell county on the 7th of May. Major Harvey Bingham, with about a half a dozen young men from Caldwell and Watauga counties, attempted to rout these murderers from their stronghold at Fort Hamby. One Sunday night, after their raid into Caldwell, Major Bingham made a well-planned move on the fort, at a late hour of the night. For some reason, Wade and his men were not aware of the approach of Bingham's men until they had entered the house. Wade and his men announced their defenceless condition, and begged for their lives. No guns were seen, and they were, so Bingham believed, his prisoners. They gave Wade and his men time to dress, after which, at a moment when the captors were off their guard, they rushed to their guns which w
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
r history. A native of one of the counties scourged by the miscreants who made the name of Fort Hamby a terror in all the surrounding country, Professor Flowers is well qualified to write its history, and the Observer thanks him for his cheerful compliance with its request to furnish it for publication a copy of his paper. The story it tells so well is one of thrilling interest, and once begun, will be eagerly followed to the end. Fort Hamby. In March, 1865, General Stoneman left East Tennessee, moving by the turnpike leading from Taylorsville, Tenn., through Watauga county to Deep Gap, on the Blue Ridge. On the 26th of March he entered Boone, N. C., and on the 27th the column was divided, one division under General Stoneman marching towards Wilkesboro, while the other, under General Gillam, crossed the Blue Ridge at Blowing Rock and went to Patterson, in Caldwell county, and then joined Stoneman at Wilkesboro. Leaving Wilkesboro on the 31st, General Stoneman moved over into
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