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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
Beginning and the ending. [from the Richmond (Va.) times, January 26, February 2, 1896.] Reminiscences of the first and last days of the war, by Gen. George A. Hundley. Interesting personal Observations. The thrilling and exciting times immediately preceding the war-the first battle of Manassas. Amelia C. H., Va., January 1, 1895. George S. Bernard, Esq., Petersburg, Va. My dear sir,—In response to your request, I have witten you the enclosed sketch, giving an account of sment, each party, however, uniting in the avowal of hostility to the restoration of the Union and determination to fight to the bitter end for independence. I add further that all the speakers in the foregoing discussion are dead except Mr. Pettigrew, who, having left the University of North Carolina fifty-eight years ago, is still doing active and efficient work in the cause of his Master, universally honored and beloved. Kemp P. Battle. [From the Richmond (Va.) Dispatch, February 9, 1896
Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
paper was read before the North Carolina Historical Society, at Chapel Hill, at the meeting held November, 1895: Roanoke Island was captured by an overwhelming Union force on the 8th of February, 1862. Hatteras had been in their possession sinc. The convention was in an exceedingly gloomy frame of mind, because the easy capture of the Hatteras forts and of Roanoke Island made it certain that Washington and Newbern would not be more fortunate, and all eastern North Carolina would be speeo leave the county; and further, that if the State endeavored to prevent their remaining neutral they would appeal to Roanoke Island. These resolutions were adopted not from disloyalty to the Southern cause, but from fear of the enemy and love of ther, for its protection. He was sorry to hear Mr. Pettigrew say that he had heard of Union men willing to submit to Roanoke Island. Union men (meaning those who belonged to the Union party before war) are as patriotic and loyal to the Southern cau
Cumberland County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
ty into the dying face of the foeman, so brave. Here the gallant Colonel Boston was urging forward his men, and it was the last I ever saw of him alive, for presently they brought him out dead, a ball having entered his mouth and caused instant death. Some few years ago, in conversation with General Rosser, he told me that he also witnessed this duel between Breathed and his Federal antagonist. The next day we passed through Farmville, and in the evening halted at the coal pits in Cumberland county, where two roads crossed. The wagon trains were passing, and our cavalry was massed between them and the enemy, held in readiness, but not anticipating an attack. Our beloved old General was sitting beneath an old oak tree near the road, leaning against the trunk of the tree, when suddenly the Federal cavalry opened fire upon us, and came near recapturing all our prisoners, who were held under guard in a bottom in front of us. General Lee slowly remounted his horse and rode past as w
Belgrade, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
usually known as the Secession Convention, appeared in his seat, and asked for a secret session, which was granted. I was one of the delegates from Wake county, and took rough notes of the ensuing debate, and will give its substance. I will first briefly describe the speakers. Mr. Pettigrew, a brother of the distinguished general, J. Johnston Pettigrew, now a minister of the Protestant Episcopal Church, was then owner of two of the most beautiful plantations in the South, Magnolia and Belgrade, large in area, fertile, surrounded by swamps, yet healthy. His numerous slaves were most kindly treated, religiously trained, contented and happy. His manner of speaking was very deliberate, polished, earnest and most impressive. Mr. Fenner B. Satterthwaite, member from Beaufort county, was a born orator. The most eloquent speech I heard in that body of great men was from him. He was one of the leaders of one of the strongest bars in the State. Mr. Kenneth Rayner, delegate from He
Amelia Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
George A. Hundley. Interesting personal Observations. The thrilling and exciting times immediately preceding the war-the first battle of Manassas. Amelia C. H., Va., January 1, 1895. George S. Bernard, Esq., Petersburg, Va. My dear sir,—In response to your request, I have witten you the enclosed sketch, giving an , we found everything in dire confusion, and there, all hope having fled, the cavalry, the last organized body of our army, disbanded. When I left my old home in Amelia, I took with me my young cousin, Eugene Jefferson, a boy, who fought by my side at High Bridge, Farmville, and Appomattox. When we disbanded that night at Lynchbon the roadside, just beyond the court-house, where General Lee had slept on his way to Richmond the previous night. That evening, after we had crossed over into Amelia, we met some Yankee marauders, who, presenting pistols, halted us and wanted to know whether we were bushwhackers. They informed us that they had just taken a pi
Magnolia, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
of the State, usually known as the Secession Convention, appeared in his seat, and asked for a secret session, which was granted. I was one of the delegates from Wake county, and took rough notes of the ensuing debate, and will give its substance. I will first briefly describe the speakers. Mr. Pettigrew, a brother of the distinguished general, J. Johnston Pettigrew, now a minister of the Protestant Episcopal Church, was then owner of two of the most beautiful plantations in the South, Magnolia and Belgrade, large in area, fertile, surrounded by swamps, yet healthy. His numerous slaves were most kindly treated, religiously trained, contented and happy. His manner of speaking was very deliberate, polished, earnest and most impressive. Mr. Fenner B. Satterthwaite, member from Beaufort county, was a born orator. The most eloquent speech I heard in that body of great men was from him. He was one of the leaders of one of the strongest bars in the State. Mr. Kenneth Rayner, del
Howardsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
my company, though, were armed with knives of wonderful make and fashion. Truly they were fearfully and wonderfully made. They were manufactured at Howardsville, Albemarle county, in Driscoll's foundry. They weighed as much as five or six pounds, and proved very serviceable shortly after in hacking the blue-beef, of wild-onionThis boy and I passed to the Amherst side of the river after supper and slept on the hill. Next morning we passed down the river on that side 'till we reached Howardsville. Singularly enough, it was at that place, just four years previously, I had entered the army, and there my career as a soldier ended. There Sheridan's men bu my license before qualifying, I had to plead the vandalism of Phil. Sheridan, as my excuse for not producing the license. Governor Smiths Entreaties. At Howardsville my young relative and I encountered Governor William Smith, venerable nomen. He had left Richmond before the enemy entered and was then stopping at the house o
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
s. Geo. J. Hundley. [From the Daily Charlotte (N. C.) Observer, January 5, 1896.] A secret session debate of the North Carolina secession Convention of 1862. Dr. Kemp B. Battle, a delegate to the Convention, makes public for the first time roceedings of a very important meeting of our War—time History—The debate centered on what to do with our slaves, eastern North Carolina having been captured by the Federals—a bitter feeling manifest in the discussion between former Union men and theeras forts and of Roanoke Island made it certain that Washington and Newbern would not be more fortunate, and all eastern North Carolina would be speedily overrun. It is impossible for me to transfer to you the impression made under these circumstanr that all the speakers in the foregoing discussion are dead except Mr. Pettigrew, who, having left the University of North Carolina fifty-eight years ago, is still doing active and efficient work in the cause of his Master, universally honored and b<
Burkeville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
home, I saw a plow stopped in the midst of a furrow and a negro plowman lying behind the plow asleep, with his face upturned to the broiling sun. Here was a picture of freedom to the negro. Reaching home in a few days, we thought best to go to Burkeville and get our paroles. On the way there I passed a good old man whom I had known from my boyhood, Mr. Stephen Harper, going to the same place, with a bag in his hand to get rations. He had been a wealthy man, but the enemy had destroyed and stolen all he had, leaving him without food. Here was a picture of the desolation of old Virginia. As we passed through the railroad cut, near Burkeville, the Yankees lined the track on either side, and one fellow told us we were d——d stragglers. I told him if I had had the pleasure of his acquaintance a few days before I should have been happy to argue the question, but just then I begged to be excused. The more honorable ones shamed him and bade him hold his peace. We obtained our paroles
Bluff Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
arolina having been captured by the Federals—a bitter feeling manifest in the discussion between former Union men and the secessionists. The following paper was read before the North Carolina Historical Society, at Chapel Hill, at the meeting held November, 1895: Roanoke Island was captured by an overwhelming Union force on the 8th of February, 1862. Hatteras had been in their possession since the 29th of August of the preceding year. All the counties of the State bordering on Albemarle Sound were exposed to their raids. On the 22d of February, 1862, Mr. William S. Pettigrew, the delegate from Washington county to the convention of the State, usually known as the Secession Convention, appeared in his seat, and asked for a secret session, which was granted. I was one of the delegates from Wake county, and took rough notes of the ensuing debate, and will give its substance. I will first briefly describe the speakers. Mr. Pettigrew, a brother of the distinguished genera
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