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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
washed for many of the officers, attended to his ambulance horse, and mine, and arose at daybreak. He was one of the cleanest and most honest cooks, and what was most gratifying, he loved me better than anybody in this world. I advised him soon after the war began to get married. Take notice, my young friends, I believe in everybody of any account getting married; but be certain you don't marry in haste and repent at leisure. Joe was no soldier. He knew his business. When we went into Maryland and Pennsylvania I became very uneasy lest he should make a break for liberty. I kept my eye on him. To lose him would be to lose my right hand. On the second day's fight at Gettysburg I saw Joe coming across the field at full speed. I never saw him in such fright, and he said to me, out of breath: Marse William, I thought dey had me! Who? I asked. Dem Yankees, pointing to the thousands of Federal prisoners on their way to Libby Prison. I was greatly relieved. I had no more fear of
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
How the Southern soldiers kept House during the war. The experience of Dr. W. W. Parker, Major of artillery, Confederate States army. Did not suffer except when separated from his negro Joe. A cow with a History—She supplied milk and was used as a pack-horse on the March—Piles of biscuits chosen by Lot—War Reminiscencesieve—I know our cause was just. The man who calls us rebels is a fool; he knows nothing of the rights of man, nor of the Constitution of the State and of the United States. I rest confident of justification in that great day when the Judge shall disclose the secrets of all hearts. The South asked for peace, and they gave us aou out of your inheritance, my comrades. There is not enough money in the coffers of all the banks to buy the proud claim that I was a loyal soldier of the Confederate States; that from Big Bethel to Appomattox I was true to her flag and glad to serve her. This shield I shall hang up in my house for my children's children, when
Chesterfield (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
est-looking house near our camping-ground. Eglin would enter first, almost without invitation, and, seating himself at the piano, would soon attract the whole household to him. There was no need of any further introduction. The cook began to hurry, and hot rolls and coffee were soon spread on the hospitable board for the dusty and tired soldiers. Often an impromptu dance by the neighbors would end the evening. Eglin and Moore have long since departed, but Frank Turnly still remains in Chesterfield. The sweet notes of Lorena and Her Bright Smile Haunts Me Still, even after thirty years, awaken tender memories of departed joys. Fought a good fight. In conclusion, my comrades, we fought a good fight, but have not yet received the fruit of our toil, but our reward is sure. We sowed in tears, but we shall reap in joy. How, when, and where, I know not. Some of our reward may be in this world—some in the next. Of this I have no doubt. The retrospect of the four years of army lif
Home (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
ood music. It often happened that on the march there were long and tedious delays caused by obstructions ahead. Sometimes it was a bridge or a broken wagon in a narrow road, sometimes waiting for somebody to come up, but from whatsoever cause the delay was irksome, especially if the day was hot and the road dusty. Under such delay music by the band was ordered, and some would dance, while others would drink in with delight the concord of sweet sound. Others would remember the Old Folks at Home, and others again The Girl I Left Behind Me. When the band was not wanted in camp at night it could get a good supper by seeking the best-looking house near our camping-ground. Eglin would enter first, almost without invitation, and, seating himself at the piano, would soon attract the whole household to him. There was no need of any further introduction. The cook began to hurry, and hot rolls and coffee were soon spread on the hospitable board for the dusty and tired soldiers. Often an im
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
of the officers, attended to his ambulance horse, and mine, and arose at daybreak. He was one of the cleanest and most honest cooks, and what was most gratifying, he loved me better than anybody in this world. I advised him soon after the war began to get married. Take notice, my young friends, I believe in everybody of any account getting married; but be certain you don't marry in haste and repent at leisure. Joe was no soldier. He knew his business. When we went into Maryland and Pennsylvania I became very uneasy lest he should make a break for liberty. I kept my eye on him. To lose him would be to lose my right hand. On the second day's fight at Gettysburg I saw Joe coming across the field at full speed. I never saw him in such fright, and he said to me, out of breath: Marse William, I thought dey had me! Who? I asked. Dem Yankees, pointing to the thousands of Federal prisoners on their way to Libby Prison. I was greatly relieved. I had no more fear of Joe's loyalty.
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
straight, polite-looking mulatto man, who walked with a quick step, and I inquired if he was for hire. He said no, but for sale. The price was $700. I at once bought him in, and in the four years alone in which he was with me, from Bethel to Appomattox, he was was worth $7,000 to me. Joe used to tell me he was brought up by his old missus in the home with a silver spoon in his mouth, and that he was taught to do everything. He was waiter, gardener, butler, washer, and ironer, etc., etc. I fodeepest and strongest. Let no man cheat you out of your inheritance, my comrades. There is not enough money in the coffers of all the banks to buy the proud claim that I was a loyal soldier of the Confederate States; that from Big Bethel to Appomattox I was true to her flag and glad to serve her. This shield I shall hang up in my house for my children's children, when dust shall return to dust, and the soul return to the God who gave it. It is not often the privilege of a man to serve his co
Charles City (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
this time gone out of memory, and the small and scanty repast was eaten with satisfaction and without a murmur as to the failure of the commissary to do better. Heroes, these poor fellows! They knew that all were doing their best, and their sacrifices caused them to love the cause with deathless devotion. With eggs, milk, sugar, and rice, I had dessert two or three times a week—apple dumplings in summer and sorghum pies, though black as tar, were a delicacy. Sometimes I sent a man to Charles City, his home, to see his wife, on the express condition that he would bring me some fresh fish. I remember on one occasion I invited General Alexander to dine soon after the fish came, and I feared he would kill himself eating. When finally the sugar gave out and we did not have anything but black-eyed peas, my dinner was made of them with a little salt pork for seasoning, and one measured quart of water afterwards. But for the water I would have been well salted, and would have kept for
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
h there were long and tedious delays caused by obstructions ahead. Sometimes it was a bridge or a broken wagon in a narrow road, sometimes waiting for somebody to come up, but from whatsoever cause the delay was irksome, especially if the day was hot and the road dusty. Under such delay music by the band was ordered, and some would dance, while others would drink in with delight the concord of sweet sound. Others would remember the Old Folks at Home, and others again The Girl I Left Behind Me. When the band was not wanted in camp at night it could get a good supper by seeking the best-looking house near our camping-ground. Eglin would enter first, almost without invitation, and, seating himself at the piano, would soon attract the whole household to him. There was no need of any further introduction. The cook began to hurry, and hot rolls and coffee were soon spread on the hospitable board for the dusty and tired soldiers. Often an impromptu dance by the neighbors would end the
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
should make a break for liberty. I kept my eye on him. To lose him would be to lose my right hand. On the second day's fight at Gettysburg I saw Joe coming across the field at full speed. I never saw him in such fright, and he said to me, out of breath: Marse William, I thought dey had me! Who? I asked. Dem Yankees, pointing to the thousands of Federal prisoners on their way to Libby Prison. I was greatly relieved. I had no more fear of Joe's loyalty. Hurried to the rear. In Tennessee one bright morning the battery was moving along a pleasant road. I was near Joe's ambulance. We did not dream of the enemy being near, when suddenly bang went a cannon over the hills just in the direction we were marching, and instantly the head of one of Joe's fine white ambulance horses was struck off, with a sinking, hollow sound, and he dropped dead in the traces. I told Joe, as soon as he could, to go to the rear, and I galloped to the top of the hill at full speed to look out for
Christmas (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
est. Instead of doing as I directed him, he hastily gathered up in the table-cloth, coffee-pot, sugar-dish, etc., and, with much agitation, said: Lord, Marse William, this ain't no place to eat breakfast! and he and his ambulance were gone in a twinkling. To Joe's good management I can say what probably few other men can say — I suffered only one day in the four years for food, and that was the day I was separated from him. Till Joe's death, some years ago, we were great friends. Every Christmas he brought me a turkey, and would say to my wife: Miss Ella, me and Marse William was jest like brothers in the war. His wife continues to eat her Christmas dinner at my house. Another piece of good luck, perhaps more remarkable than this, was that in the four years I was in the Army I did not once get wet. I captured early in the war an excellent oil-cloth, made like a Spanish poncho, with a hole in the centre. With this on, and a slouch hat that turned the rain like a tin roof, and a
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