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Leedstown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
King George, and picketing the river as far down as Layton's Ferry. One squadron, quartered at Leedstown, held the extreme left of their line. The scouts carefully noted the houses in which the men d, and these were duly provided with oars and concealed in a marshy creek, a mile or two above Leedstown, in readiness for use. These preliminaries having been arranged, the necessary permit from the entire Federal regiment, was abandoned, and a plan arranged for capturing the squadron at Leedstown. Entrusted to Major Waller. The execution of this plan was entrusted to Major Thomas Walsary to capture the reserve guards, who were fifteen in number, and occupied a vacant store in Leedstown, where they slept on their arms, having their horses saddled and bridled, close at hand. The arge lighter, capable of carrying one hundred men, or more, was found near the water's edge at Leedstown, and this was quickly launched. The prisoners were put into it, with a suitable guard of men,
Westmoreland (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
llowed on the expedition, or an officer holding rank above that of major. In consequence, the purpose of attacking the entire Federal regiment, was abandoned, and a plan arranged for capturing the squadron at Leedstown. Entrusted to Major Waller. The execution of this plan was entrusted to Major Thomas Waller, as cool and intrepid an officer as ever wore stars on his collar. To the call for volunteers, more than a hundred responded from the regiment. As the point of attack was in Westmoreland, from which county, Company C hailed, the men of this company offered to go almost in a body. On reaching the shore of the little creek in which the boats were concealed, about dark, December 1, 1862, it was found that their capacity was much less than had been supposed. Thirty-six men seemed as many as the larger boat would carry, and only fourteen could be accomodated in the skiff. Major Waller commanded the batteau, and Lieutenant G. W. Beale, the skiff. The night was cold and da
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
lan, in The Life and Campaigns of General J, E. B. Stuart, briefly refers to the affair in a sentence, in in which the Boston printer gives the name of our major, erroneously, as Weller. Of the participants in this nocturnal raid, I can now recall but few among the living. Among these is Major R. Bird Lewis, the president of the Confederate Veteran Association of Washington, D. C., who was a sergeant at the time, and the only man on our side who was wounded. Dr. Gordon F. Bowie, of Richmond county, was one of the men who took an icy bath in shoving the batteau over the sand-bar. William R. Rust, of Colonial Beach, was active in forcing open the door of the house, where the chief danger was met. Lawrence Washington, of Oak Grove, rendered valuable service in surprising and capturing the most important of the pickets, and to him the Union captain surrendered his pistol in the last encounter. Jones and Johnson, the scouts who were sent over the river in advance, and who served as
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
regiment is mentioned in the official history of the Pennsylvania regiments, published by that State. Major H. B. McClellan, in The Life and Campaigns of General J, E. B. Stuart, briefly refers to the affair in a sentence, in in which the Boston printer gives the name of our major, erroneously, as Weller. Of the participants in this nocturnal raid, I can now recall but few among the living. Among these is Major R. Bird Lewis, the president of the Confederate Veteran Association of Washington, D. C., who was a sergeant at the time, and the only man on our side who was wounded. Dr. Gordon F. Bowie, of Richmond county, was one of the men who took an icy bath in shoving the batteau over the sand-bar. William R. Rust, of Colonial Beach, was active in forcing open the door of the house, where the chief danger was met. Lawrence Washington, of Oak Grove, rendered valuable service in surprising and capturing the most important of the pickets, and to him the Union captain surrendered his
Oak Grove (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
now recall but few among the living. Among these is Major R. Bird Lewis, the president of the Confederate Veteran Association of Washington, D. C., who was a sergeant at the time, and the only man on our side who was wounded. Dr. Gordon F. Bowie, of Richmond county, was one of the men who took an icy bath in shoving the batteau over the sand-bar. William R. Rust, of Colonial Beach, was active in forcing open the door of the house, where the chief danger was met. Lawrence Washington, of Oak Grove, rendered valuable service in surprising and capturing the most important of the pickets, and to him the Union captain surrendered his pistol in the last encounter. Jones and Johnson, the scouts who were sent over the river in advance, and who served as guides on the night of the expedition, have long since found their graves, not far from the scene of the exploit. Brave Colonel Thomas Waller, as he was afterwards known, has gone, now, also, to join the silent majority. Like most of
Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): chapter 1.38
er would. And so it proved. The pickets were captured without breaking the stillness of the night with the faintest alarm. Having secured the outer guards, it was next necessary to capture the reserve guards, who were fifteen in number, and occupied a vacant store in Leedstown, where they slept on their arms, having their horses saddled and bridled, close at hand. The writer of this account led the party advancing to the capture of this reserve, having at his side Pete Stewart, an old Mexican soldier, and a tried and trusty scout. From the shadow of an adjacent house, as we drew near to the store, the form of the sentinel was descried under the porch. The moon was just rising, throwing a gleam on the river, the sound of whose flowing only disturbed the perfect stillness of the night. Our pause was but for a moment, when a dash was made for the steps leading up to the door of the store. The startled sentinel ran for the steps, too, without pausing to fire his carbine. He had
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
f the month of November, 1862, the 9th Virginia Cavalry Regiment, commanded by Colonel R. L. T. Beale, held position on the extreme right of General Lee's army on the Rappahannock, and were encamped in the vicinity of Lloyd's, in Essex county. The duties of the regiment were to guard the river shore with an extended line of pickets. These pickets were frequently aroused and entertained by the passage up the river of Federal gunboats and transports, communicating with Burnside's army at Fredericksburg. Quite frequently, also, an exchange of rifle shots was made with the Federal pickets on the Northern Neck shore of the river. Many men of this regiment had their homes and families on that side of the river, and the sight of the Union horsemen riding unchecked over the roads and fields so familiar to them aroused in many breasts an intense desire to cross the river and strike the enemy a blow. Into this feeling none entered more heartily than the Colonel himself. Accordingly, scou
Lloyds (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
ld dash of a detachment of the 9th Virginia Cavalry. Forty-nine Yankees captured. A well-planned and neatly-executed nocturnal raid Interestingly related by one of the Participants—Perilious return journey. To the Editor of the Dispatch : In the latter part of the month of November, 1862, the 9th Virginia Cavalry Regiment, commanded by Colonel R. L. T. Beale, held position on the extreme right of General Lee's army on the Rappahannock, and were encamped in the vicinity of Lloyd's, in Essex county. The duties of the regiment were to guard the river shore with an extended line of pickets. These pickets were frequently aroused and entertained by the passage up the river of Federal gunboats and transports, communicating with Burnside's army at Fredericksburg. Quite frequently, also, an exchange of rifle shots was made with the Federal pickets on the Northern Neck shore of the river. Many men of this regiment had their homes and families on that side of the river, and the s
ling none entered more heartily than the Colonel himself. Accordingly, scouts were dispatched to ascertain the enemy's exact position, strength, disposition of sentinels, and also to search for boats sufficient to carry over several hundred troops. An application was at the same time forwarded to headquarters for permission to cross the river with 300 men. The scouts returned promptly, having ascertained that one cavalry regiment—the Eighth Pennsylvania—was on outpost duty, encamped at Greenlaw's, in King George, and picketing the river as far down as Layton's Ferry. One squadron, quartered at Leedstown, held the extreme left of their line. The scouts carefully noted the houses in which the men of this squadron slept, where their horses were picketed, and how their sentinels were posted at night. Only two boats—a large batteau and a skiff—could be secured, and these were duly provided with oars and concealed in a marshy creek, a mile or two above Leedstown, in readiness for us
H. B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 1.38
sly, and not in vain, for the sounds of volleys and yells that would tell of the successful assault of his men. Only one casualty occurred among the enemy, and that was the painful wounding of a man under the eye. The boldness and success of the enterprise were recognized and commended in general orders, issued from the headquarters of the army; and the disaster to the Federal regiment is mentioned in the official history of the Pennsylvania regiments, published by that State. Major H. B. McClellan, in The Life and Campaigns of General J, E. B. Stuart, briefly refers to the affair in a sentence, in in which the Boston printer gives the name of our major, erroneously, as Weller. Of the participants in this nocturnal raid, I can now recall but few among the living. Among these is Major R. Bird Lewis, the president of the Confederate Veteran Association of Washington, D. C., who was a sergeant at the time, and the only man on our side who was wounded. Dr. Gordon F. Bowie, of
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