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Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.56
picuous figure. Made many telling speeches in his day. A frequent visitor to the field of honor. When the death of the venerable ex-Senator George W. Jones, of Iowa, was announced recently, the misstatement went with it that ex-Senator Bradbury, of Maine, was the only living member of the senatorial group that was in office previous to the outbreak of the rebellion. This was a curious mistake, in view of the fact that ex-Senator Harlan, of Iowa, is very much alive, that he was not only prominent as a senator and a member of the first Cabinet of Lincoln, but also that he was an eager candidate for the nomination for Governor of Iowa last year, and thatIowa last year, and that only a short time before the death of Jones he had made a stirring speech to the old soldiers on Memorial Day. Less curious, perhaps, yet still remarkable, was the fact that almost no commentator upon the death of Jones and the ante-war senatorial group remembered that the last of the Southern Senators to leave the Senate on a
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.56
a veritable cyclopedia of the persons and incidents of the 1830s, 1840s and 1850s. After all he was remembered chiefly on account of the fact that he was the second of Cilley in the celebrated Cilley-Graves duel, fought to a finish with rifles, amid the hills of Maryland, and when Jones' principal was practically murdered. Clingman was not only a second in duels, but he was more than once a principal. His most famous meeting was with one of his Southern colleagues, William L. Yancey, of Alabama, on account of words used by the latter during the famous debate upon the question of Texas' annexation. Clingman had twitted Southern senators harshly for their indifference in regard to a resolution bearing upon the reception of petitions from Abolitionists, he supporting the right of petition. Yancey replied to his reflections with one of the bitterest and most personal of the tirades which made the Congresses of that day remarkable. He declared that Clingman was everwhere viewed as t
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.56
e for the nomination for Governor of Iowa last year, and that only a short time before the death of Jones he had made a stirring speech to the old soldiers on Memorial Day. Less curious, perhaps, yet still remarkable, was the fact that almost no commentator upon the death of Jones and the ante-war senatorial group remembered that the last of the Southern Senators to leave the Senate on account of the secession of States is still in the land of the living. Thomas Lanier Clingman, of North Carolina, almost as prolific a coiner of speeches as Senator Stewart or Senator Call, remained in the Senate until the close of the extra session of the Senate which followed the inauguration of Lincoln. The body adjourned on March 28, 1861, and this one lone senator from a seceding State, said good-bye to his associates, and passed away only to meet his Northern friends on the field of battle. Bradbury had ended his career in the Senate several years before Clingman entered the body, and Jones
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.56
of the philanthropist, which estate, however, was a very small one in those days compared to the millions comprised in it at this time. Young Clingman was a gallant and persistent suitor, and as the father stood aloof there was a good prospect that Miss Corcoran would honor the brilliant North Carolinian with her heart and hand. Another figure intruded in the way, however. Senator Slidell, afterwards a famous prisoner of war, had for his private secretary a young man named Eustis, of Louisiana, a brother of the present ambassador to France. The private secretary was not in the least disheartened by the rivalry of the popular representative. He belonged to one of the first families of his State, and admitted no superiority. The struggle between the two Southerners was long and generous, and when the lady finally decided in favor of the Louisianian, the North Carolinian was generous and hearty in his congratulations. That Clingman's disappointment was keen and lasting was no
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.56
ther in 1806, while Clingman first saw the light of day in 1812 Jones was a man of striking appearance, and has attracted much attention during the last few years by his venerable presence. He was a voluble conversationalist and a veritable cyclopedia of the persons and incidents of the 1830s, 1840s and 1850s. After all he was remembered chiefly on account of the fact that he was the second of Cilley in the celebrated Cilley-Graves duel, fought to a finish with rifles, amid the hills of Maryland, and when Jones' principal was practically murdered. Clingman was not only a second in duels, but he was more than once a principal. His most famous meeting was with one of his Southern colleagues, William L. Yancey, of Alabama, on account of words used by the latter during the famous debate upon the question of Texas' annexation. Clingman had twitted Southern senators harshly for their indifference in regard to a resolution bearing upon the reception of petitions from Abolitionists, h
Bladensburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.56
rwhere viewed as the betrayer of his country. He was looked upon as a renegade recreant to the principles and interests of the South. He had gone over to the ranks of enemy, and then turned and flaunted the colors of that enemy in the faces of his own friends. Of course, such language could have but one result. Indeed, it was plainly intended to provoke a hostile meeting. Clingman promptly sent a challenge, which was promptly accepted. The place chosen was not the famous ground at Bladensburg, but farther to the south, and but a short distance from the scene of the Cilley-Graves tragedy. Previous to the meeting, however, mutual friends made every attempt to arrange the difficulty, and when the irate gentlemen faced each other, they shot to miss; friends then brought them together. Yancey made the amende honorable and the affair ended without bloodshed. During his three terms in the House Clingman plunged into debate upon every question, sometimes with more zeal than disc
Smoky Mountain (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.56
ht to provoke a resort to pistols. He was really a most gentle and lovable man, and preferred the pursuits of peace to the wrangles of the legislative hall. After his course in the University, where he showed a great aptitude for the acquirement of learning, he studied surveying and tramped the mountains of the old North State with the compass and sextant. He established the height of many of the most prominent peaks, and one in the Black Mountain is called Clingman's Peak, and one in Smoky Mountain will always be known as Clingman's Dome. He was also geologist, lapidary and botanist, and gave to the world valuable information of the existence in his State of gold, diamonds, rubies, platinum and mica. When the first wave of Darwinism swept over the world Clingman took up the cudgels for the Hebraic view of the creation of man, one of the best of his many preserved papers in his exposition of the Follies of Positive Philosophers. He lectured upon almost all subjects, and was as
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.56
The career of T. L. Clingman. [from the Philadelphia times, October 10, 1896.] the sole survivor of the Southern ante-bellum Senators. Once a conspicuous figure. Made many telling speeches in his day. A frequent visitor to the field of honor. When the death of the venerable ex-Senator George W. Jones, of Iowa, was announced recently, the misstatement went with it that ex-Senator Bradbury, of Maine, was the only living member of the senatorial group that was in office previous to the outbreak of the rebellion. This was a curious mistake, in view of the fact that ex-Senator Harlan, of Iowa, is very much alive, that he was not only prominent as a senator and a member of the first Cabinet of Lincoln, but also that he was an eager candidate for the nomination for Governor of Iowa last year, and that only a short time before the death of Jones he had made a stirring speech to the old soldiers on Memorial Day. Less curious, perhaps, yet still remarkable, was the fact that almost
France (France) (search for this): chapter 1.56
as a very small one in those days compared to the millions comprised in it at this time. Young Clingman was a gallant and persistent suitor, and as the father stood aloof there was a good prospect that Miss Corcoran would honor the brilliant North Carolinian with her heart and hand. Another figure intruded in the way, however. Senator Slidell, afterwards a famous prisoner of war, had for his private secretary a young man named Eustis, of Louisiana, a brother of the present ambassador to France. The private secretary was not in the least disheartened by the rivalry of the popular representative. He belonged to one of the first families of his State, and admitted no superiority. The struggle between the two Southerners was long and generous, and when the lady finally decided in favor of the Louisianian, the North Carolinian was generous and hearty in his congratulations. That Clingman's disappointment was keen and lasting was not to be discovered by any outward display, but th
Morristown (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.56
at the old gentleman had exhausted his means. Not only that, but his mind has been gradually weakening for years and he needed attention, which he could not have commanded except among those of his own State and who knew and loved him. First he was taken to Confederate Soldiers' Home, but this was too much for the pride of his State, the people of which ever held him in high esteem, and, broken in body and wind, without a dollar of his own in the world, he is now living at his old home at Asheville upon funds which are delicately placed at his disposal by friends who will not permit so exalted a citizen to live the late evening of his life in a charitable institution. Almost as soon as the first bitterness of the war and of reconstruction began to be less poignantly felt, Clingman reappeared in Washington. During the sittings of Congress the place had fascination for him that he could not resist. He stopped at a prominent hotel as long as his purse would permit it, and then a bo
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