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Enfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.57
was each time prevented by halting my command and coming to a front, thus facing him with the river at our backs. The force engaged with our skirmishers up the river was not immediately feared by our battalion, being so much farther distant, and their fire, both of artillery and cavalry, very inaccurate. Owing to this same flanking force of the enemy our skirmish line could not be relieved without exposing the men and our colors to capture while rallying. Our losses of ordnance, seven Enfield rifles and accoutrements; of camp and garrison equipage, light. Casualties: two men missing, supposed to be in the hands of the enemy. Five men wounded. * * * The entire operation demonstrated the fact that the negro soldiers can march. The above report evidently proves the fact that the main object of this regiment was to retreat, and Captain Carrington states in his report that the reason so few negroes were captured was that they outran our cavalry horses, and as Branson shows by t
Port Isabel (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.57
111 men. The colonel says above that the Confederates were repulsed with loss, and in another place that the Confederate fire was returned with effect. Colonel Ford and Captain Carrington say the victory was complete by the Confederates without the loss of a single man, which is undoubtedly true. Extract from the report of Lieutenant-Colonel David Branson, 62d United States Colored Troops, battle May 13, 1865: Headquarters of 62d Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Brazos Santiago, Texas, May 8, 1865. By order of Colonel Barrett fell back one and a half miles to a bluff on the river, about twelve miles from Coca Chica, to get dinner and rest for the night. Here, at 4 P. M., a large force of the enemy's cavalry was observed endeavoring to gain our rear. I was ordered with the regiment to form line obliquely to the rear, faced toward them. As soon as formed, and while awaiting expected cavalry charge, the enemy from a hill up the river (one and a half miles farth
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.57
the hurrahs ceased he gave the order, Forward! Charge! The response was a Texan yell, and a charge which no infantry line ever formed on the Rio Grande could withstand. The reason why so few negroes were captured in the last fight of the war was because they outran our cavalry horses. Hancock's company and the Indiana troops several times saved the negroes. These veteran troops attempted to withstand the charges that Colonel Ford and his Confederates hurled against them, but Branson's negro troops ran, and ran well, as the report of their commander proves. The writer has seen Colonel Ford and several old Confederates who live in this county, who were in this fight, and the writer has often talked with them on the subject. That this was the last fight of the war, and almost one month after Comrade Slater's West Point fight, I think I have proven. It was a victory for the Confederates, and will go down in history as such. Luther Conyer. San Diego, Texas, November 30, 1896.
San Diego (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.57
the hurrahs ceased he gave the order, Forward! Charge! The response was a Texan yell, and a charge which no infantry line ever formed on the Rio Grande could withstand. The reason why so few negroes were captured in the last fight of the war was because they outran our cavalry horses. Hancock's company and the Indiana troops several times saved the negroes. These veteran troops attempted to withstand the charges that Colonel Ford and his Confederates hurled against them, but Branson's negro troops ran, and ran well, as the report of their commander proves. The writer has seen Colonel Ford and several old Confederates who live in this county, who were in this fight, and the writer has often talked with them on the subject. That this was the last fight of the war, and almost one month after Comrade Slater's West Point fight, I think I have proven. It was a victory for the Confederates, and will go down in history as such. Luther Conyer. San Diego, Texas, November 30, 1896.
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.57
Captain Robinson. Cocke's and Wilson's Companies were ordered to attack the enemy's right flank; the artillery was directed to open fire at once, which was done with effect. Colonel Ford supported the movement in person, with two companies and two pieces of artillery. The 62d United States Troops, Branson's Negro Regiment, was quickly demoralized, and fled in dismay. Captain Robinson led a charge and drove back the skirmish line of the 34th Indiana and Hancock's 2d Texas Company. The Indiana troops threw down their arms and surrendered; most of the Texans escaped, retreating through the dense chaparral. The entire Federal force were on the retreat, the fierce cavalry charges of the Confederates harassed them exceedingly, and the Confederate artillery moved at a gallop. Three times lines of skirmishers were thrown out to check the pursuit. These lines were roughly handled and many prisoners captured by the Confederates. The Federals were driven for about eight miles into t
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.57
on that the entire 34th Indiana Regiment was in the fight. Colonel Ford, I think, was about correct in the number of troops engaged on the Federal side. Confederate States Army troops under Slaughter engaged: Benavides' Regiment, five companies cavalry, Colonel John S. Ford; Carter's Battalion, three companies, Captain W. H. Dteran troops and commanded by experienced officers. As the sun went down the fire slackened and the enemy began to retreat toward Boca Chica, a shell from the United States war ship Isabella exploded between the Confederates and the retreating force of the enemy. A seventeen-year-old trooper of Carter's battery blazed away in the The firing ceased. The last gun had been fired. Colonel Barrett claims the last volley of the war was fired by the 62d United States colored troops. The United States war ship Isabella, very likely, fired the last shell, but it was a Texan, on Texas soil, of Carter's battery, that fired the last gun. The last battle of the w
Fort Taylor (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.57
ularly organized forces was fought in Texas May 13, 1865, and called the battle of Palmetto Ranch, near the city of Brownsville, Texas, on the Rio Grande. This battle was fought between the 3d Brigade, 1st Division, 25th Army Corps, United States Trrrett, 62d United States Troops: headquarters third Brigade, first Division Twenty-fifth Army Corps, camp (near) Brownsville, Tex., August 10, 1865. General—I have the honor to submit the following report of the action at Palmetto Ranch, Tex.,rts to the Veteran if desired. They say in substance: On the morning of the 13th a very small force was present in Brownsville. There were not more than 300 men at and below that city of Confederates. Colonel John S. Ford, assuming command, enemy, who outnumbered his troops more than five to one, without the loss of a man. General Slaughter was detained in Brownsville until late in the day of the 18th, but Colonel Ford, called by his soldiers Old Rip, was all day in the thickest of th
Theodore H. Barrett (search for this): chapter 1.57
een the 3d Brigade, 1st Division, 25th Army Corps, United States Troops, commanded by Colonel Theodore H. Barrett, of the 62d United States Colored Troops, and the Southern Division, of the Western sl David Branson; 2d United States Texas Cavalry (not mounted), Lieutenant James W. Hancock. Colonel Barrett, in his official report—Vol. 48, Part 1, page 266, Official Reports, Union and Confederateexas, and 200 men of 34th Indiana Regiments were actually engaged, making 500, though from Colonel Barrett's report I would draw the fact that the 200 men detached and mentioned above by Branson werofficial records mentioned above I wish to quote partly from the reports of the Union colonels, Barrett and Branson. Extract from the report of Colonel T. H. Barrett, 62d United States Troops: Colonel T. H. Barrett, 62d United States Troops: headquarters third Brigade, first Division Twenty-fifth Army Corps, camp (near) Brownsville, Tex., August 10, 1865. General—I have the honor to submit the following report of the action at Palmett
David Branson (search for this): chapter 1.57
rison; 62d United States Troops, under Lieutenant-Colonel David Branson; 2d United States Texas Cavalry (not metween 1,600 and 1,700 strong. From Lieutenant-Colonel David Branson's report, page 267, same official repoct that the 200 men detached and mentioned above by Branson were driven or had retired to a hill were the 34th es engaged in the battle of May 13, 1865. Lieutenant-Colonel Branson says the attacking force was about 250. from the reports of the Union colonels, Barrett and Branson. Extract from the report of Colonel T. H. Barretly true. Extract from the report of Lieutenant-Colonel David Branson, 62d United States Colored Troops, batred was that they outran our cavalry horses, and as Branson shows by the above report that the 34th Indiana wereces of artillery. The 62d United States Troops, Branson's Negro Regiment, was quickly demoralized, and fled Ford and his Confederates hurled against them, but Branson's negro troops ran, and ran well, as the report of
Edward J. Cocke (search for this): chapter 1.57
s' Battalion, six companies, Captain William Robinson; Jones' Light Battery, Captain O. G. Jones; Wilson's Cavalry, one company (unattached), Captain T. R. Wilson; Cocke's Cavalry, one company (unattached), Captain J. B. (?) Cocke. If these companies were full, there would be about 1,500 men, but Captain Carrington, in his reporCocke. If these companies were full, there would be about 1,500 men, but Captain Carrington, in his report of the battle, says that on May 1, 1865, there were about 500 Confederate troops of all arms on the Rio Grande, and Colonel Ford says this is substantially correct, and that Captain Carrington is also correct when he says that there were only about 300 Confederates engaged in the battle of May 13, 1865. Lieutenant-Colonel Bransond States—were also moving forward, perhaps to sustain skirmishers. Ford immediately made his dispositions. His right wing was under command of Captain Robinson. Cocke's and Wilson's Companies were ordered to attack the enemy's right flank; the artillery was directed to open fire at once, which was done with effect. Colonel Ford
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