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Dry Valley (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
One brigade of Negley's Division was posted in the gap on the Ringgold road, and two brigades on the top of the ridge to the right of the road, adjoining the brigade in the road; Reynold's Division on the right of Negley's, and reaching to the Dry Valley road; Brannon's Division in the rear of Reynolds's right, as a reserve; McCook's Corps on the right of the Dry Valley road, and stretching toward the west, his right reaching nearly to Chattanooga creek; Crittenden's entire corps was posted on Dry Valley road, and stretching toward the west, his right reaching nearly to Chattanooga creek; Crittenden's entire corps was posted on the heights to the left of Ringgold road, with Steadman's Division of Granger's Corps in reserve behind his left; Baird's Division in reserve and in supporting distance of the brigade in the gap; McCook's Brigade of Granger's Corps, was posted as a reserve to the brigade of Negley's on the top of the ridge, to the right of the road; Minty's cavalry was on the Ringgold road, about a mile and a half in advance of the gap. No chance for Bragg. With practically the entire Army of the Cumb
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
g timber down to obstruct our passage. I think we ought to press forward as rapidly as possible. Respectfully, etc., N. B. Forrest. Brigadier-General. To Lieutenant-General L. Polk. (Please forward to General Bragg.) At the time this dispatch was written the Union army was not at Chattanooga, but was in line, fully prepared for battle in Rossville Gap, and upon Missionary Ridge to the right and left of this gap, with one of its three corps extending across the valley, nearly to Lookout Mountain. It was, therefore, directly in General Forrest's front, and only a mile distant. The position it occupied could not have been carried by direct assault. The army trains were not passing around the point of Lookout Mountain, but were going into Chattanooga under direct orders from General Rosencranz. No pontoon was being thrown across the river for the purpose of retreating, and, by General Rosencranz's order, the one already in position was heavily guarded to prevent any soldier le
Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
sage was written, General Forrest, it is said, was making observations high up in a tree on Missionary Ridge. He had been sweeping the great battle-field of Chickamauga with his glasses; he believed s not at Chattanooga, but was in line, fully prepared for battle in Rossville Gap, and upon Missionary Ridge to the right and left of this gap, with one of its three corps extending across the valley,uire what he would have met had he followed General Forrest's advice. Rossville Gap, in Missionary Ridge, is a deep defile, a mile in length, through its highest crests, which, with its flanks on roops which had been forced from the Union right and centre, had passed to the rear through Missionary Ridge, and turning to the right, had taken possession of Rossville Gap, and so stood once more acwith those from Snodgrass Hill, for the purpose of passsing them through McFarlan's Gap, in Missionary Ridge, around Bragg's right, and placing them in Rossville Gap, between Bragg and Chattanooga, Ge
Chattanooga Creek (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
ed to place the troops in position at that point. One brigade of Negley's Division was posted in the gap on the Ringgold road, and two brigades on the top of the ridge to the right of the road, adjoining the brigade in the road; Reynold's Division on the right of Negley's, and reaching to the Dry Valley road; Brannon's Division in the rear of Reynolds's right, as a reserve; McCook's Corps on the right of the Dry Valley road, and stretching toward the west, his right reaching nearly to Chattanooga creek; Crittenden's entire corps was posted on the heights to the left of Ringgold road, with Steadman's Division of Granger's Corps in reserve behind his left; Baird's Division in reserve and in supporting distance of the brigade in the gap; McCook's Brigade of Granger's Corps, was posted as a reserve to the brigade of Negley's on the top of the ridge, to the right of the road; Minty's cavalry was on the Ringgold road, about a mile and a half in advance of the gap. No chance for Bragg.
Ringgold, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
General Thomas says: I then proceeded to Rossville, accompanied by Generals Garfield and Gordon Granger, and immediately prepared to place the troops in position at that point. One brigade of Negley's Division was posted in the gap on the Ringgold road, and two brigades on the top of the ridge to the right of the road, adjoining the brigade in the road; Reynold's Division on the right of Negley's, and reaching to the Dry Valley road; Brannon's Division in the rear of Reynolds's right, as ird's Division in reserve and in supporting distance of the brigade in the gap; McCook's Brigade of Granger's Corps, was posted as a reserve to the brigade of Negley's on the top of the ridge, to the right of the road; Minty's cavalry was on the Ringgold road, about a mile and a half in advance of the gap. No chance for Bragg. With practically the entire Army of the Cumberland rested, and thus skilfully posted in a strong position, with sufficient rations and ammunition, and with its
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
rom Forrest. At all events, thirty-three years after this battle, General Longstreet, the survivor of all the able generals of the Confederate army, expresses the deliberate opinion that, this dispatch fixed the fate of the Confederacy. In that opinion he does not agree with some of the other military leaders. Whether the military historians will agree with him or not, the fact remains that the discovery of this dispatch and Longstreet's opinion, that it contained the destiny of the Confederate States will be accepted as a most valuable contribution to the military history of the Civil War. General Boynton's comments. A Star reporter brought he views attributed to General Longstreet, concerning the Forrest dispatch, to the attention of General H. V. Boynton, who, as a soldier, took conspicuous part in the Chattanooga campaign, and who is recognized as, perhaps, the best living authority on matters relating to the Army of the Cumberland. General Boynton said: The disp
Rossville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
is dispatch is as follows: On the Road, September 21, 1863. General: We are in a mile of Rossville—have been on the point of Missionary Ridge. Can see Chattanooga and everything around. The et: On mission Ridge. On taking possession of Mission Ridge, one mile or thereabouts from Rossville, we found the enemy fortifying the gap. Dismounted Colonel Dibbrell's regiment, under command st had two divisions, which habitually fought dismounted. While the Union army was in line at Rossville, five miles southeast of Chattanooga, General Rosencranz was in the city, sending out ammunitin Rossville Gap, between Bragg and Chattanooga, General Thomas says: I then proceeded to Rossville, accompanied by Generals Garfield and Gordon Granger, and immediately prepared to place the trstill confronts us. * * * (Signed) Braxton Bragg. Of course, this advanced position at Rossville was not one for occupation, and during the night of the 21st, Thomas moved his army to Chattan
ing physician in New York city. Knowing that Dr. John A. Wyeth was collecting material for a life of General Forrest, in whose command Dr. Wyeth served when a mere lad, Dr. Polk loaned to Dr. Wyeth this dispatch. In some way the War department heard that Dr. Wyeth was in possession of this hitherto unsuspected document, and most urgently requested that it be committed to its care, as it was a dispatch of the utmost importance, and should therefore be kept in a place of permanent safety. Drs. Wyeth and Polk were of the opinion that the request should be granted, and sent the dispatch to the War Department, after having caused a fac-simile of it to be photographed. Recently Dr. Wyeth sent to General Longstreet a fac-simile of this dispatch, and it was this which brought from Longstreet a day or two ago, a letter of acknowledgment, in which he says: That dispatch fixed the fate of the Confederacy. And he also added that with that as a guide, he should write a magazine article
Mechlenburg Polk (search for this): chapter 1.9
st exciting conditions, signed by him, and addressed to General Polk, who was asked to forward it to General Bragg. At the stirrup as a writing desk. This dispatch announced to General Polk, General Forrest's belief that the enemy were evacuatin As soon as the dispatch was written, it was sent to General Polk, who, as requested, sent the information to General Bra, who was the commanding officer. After this was done, General Polk put the dispatch in his dispatch box, and years after it was found by his son, Dr. Mechlenburg Polk, who is now a practicing physician in New York city. Knowing that Dr. John A. rrest, in whose command Dr. Wyeth served when a mere lad, Dr. Polk loaned to Dr. Wyeth this dispatch. In some way the Warore be kept in a place of permanent safety. Drs. Wyeth and Polk were of the opinion that the request should be granted, andeet wondered why Bragg had abandoned his plan. Forrest and Polk could not understand the sudden change in Rosencranz's move
proximity to these lines, concealed by the forests, was writing his dispatch to General Polk. After initiating and superintending the movement by which he withdrew his forces from the Kelley field line, to be followed with those from Snodgrass Hill, for the purpose of passsing them through McFarlan's Gap, in Missionary Ridge, around Bragg's right, and placing them in Rossville Gap, between Bragg and Chattanooga, General Thomas says: I then proceeded to Rossville, accompanied by Generals Garfield and Gordon Granger, and immediately prepared to place the troops in position at that point. One brigade of Negley's Division was posted in the gap on the Ringgold road, and two brigades on the top of the ridge to the right of the road, adjoining the brigade in the road; Reynold's Division on the right of Negley's, and reaching to the Dry Valley road; Brannon's Division in the rear of Reynolds's right, as a reserve; McCook's Corps on the right of the Dry Valley road, and stretching tow
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