hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Stonewall Jackson 260 0 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 201 9 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 118 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes 112 0 Browse Search
Danville (Virginia, United States) 98 2 Browse Search
Sam Davis 94 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 92 8 Browse Search
United States (United States) 90 0 Browse Search
Judah Phillips Benjamin 84 0 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 77 7 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 134 total hits in 53 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Lake Charles (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
o the office of civil sheriff of this parish, and always took an active share in politics as a becoming citizen. His wife and four sons and two daughters survive the deceased. The sons are William, Albert, Charles and Frank, the first two mentioned being married, and the daughters are Mrs. Thomas E. Waggaman, of Washington, and Mrs. Mamie Birne, of Wilmington, Delaware. For the past year or so of his life, the Colonel was engaged in experimenting upon a small farm he possessed near Lake Charles, in the hope that he might make it profitable, and it was during this period that he exposed himself injudiciously to the weather, and to too great hardships for a man of his age. The experiment was not successful, the railroad being too far away from his farm to enable him to operate it to advantage. One of the touching incidents of his late years happened at the time of the Veteran Reunion in Houston. One of the men who had been in his command at Malvern Hill proposed to go to this
Harrisburg (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
ife, the Colonel was engaged in experimenting upon a small farm he possessed near Lake Charles, in the hope that he might make it profitable, and it was during this period that he exposed himself injudiciously to the weather, and to too great hardships for a man of his age. The experiment was not successful, the railroad being too far away from his farm to enable him to operate it to advantage. One of the touching incidents of his late years happened at the time of the Veteran Reunion in Houston. One of the men who had been in his command at Malvern Hill proposed to go to this reunion and one of the great plans he had in connection with it, was to wear the sword his chief had thrown away at Malvern Hill, rather than have it captured. The Colonel accomodated him, but he said: Only once in its history since I have had it, has it parted company from me. Take it, and be sure that it gets back to me safe. I could hardly refuse it to one who had followed it so gallantly as you. But,
Poland (Poland) (search for this): chapter 1.18
ommission from the king of Spain. He was a Swiss soldier. He commanded a regiment of Swiss infantry and saw service under three kings. The first of these kings was Amedee I, of Italy. He conferred upon the Baron his title. In testimony of esteem he further presented the great-grandfather of this sketch, with a medalion, a gold snuff box, containing the King's portrait and ornamented with diamonds, and other tokens which remained heirlooms in the family for generations. Stanislaus, of Poland, next commanded this historic soldier's services, and then the Baron came to Louisiana under commission of his majesty of Spain. As his bride, the Baron brought to America, Christine Carbonari, of the celebrated Spinola family. Two daughters were born to this union. One of them married Cyril Arnoult, a merchant of Flanders, who settled in this city, and who participated in the battle of New Orleans. Their daughter, Camille Arnoult, married George Augustus Waggaman. Mr. Waggaman was a
Jefferson (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
Ontario, Canada, and who refused the order of knighthood offered by Queen Victoria; (3) Eugene, the subject of the present sketch; (4) Mathilde, who married Judge Henry D. Ogden; (5) Eliza, who married John R. Conway, and (6) Camille, who died in youth. Eugene Waggaman was educated at Mount St. Mary's College, Maryland, and graduated from there as valedictorian of the class of 1846. Returning to this State from school, he took charge of his mother's and his own sugar plantation in Jefferson Parish, and at the age of twenty-five years married Miss Felicie Sauve, the daughter of Pierre Sauve, of the same parish. During the years 1858-59 he was a member of the State Legislature which called the Constitutional Convention. In the next year the war had come. With the martial blood of his ancestors tingling in his veins, he at once prepared for the fight. He raised in his own parish a company of cavalry known as the Jefferson Chasseurs. These were the young men of the plantations,
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 1.18
. The senator never recovered from the injury. He refused to permit the amputation of his leg, and died of gangrene on March 22, 1843. The duel had occurred on the 20th. Had he lived six months longer he would have been sent as minister to France, for such appears to have been President Tyler's intention. Senator Waggaman's children were: (1) Henry St. John, who became a lawyer and died at an early age; (2) Christine, who married Sanfield McDonald, the first prime minister of Ontario, Canada, and who refused the order of knighthood offered by Queen Victoria; (3) Eugene, the subject of the present sketch; (4) Mathilde, who married Judge Henry D. Ogden; (5) Eliza, who married John R. Conway, and (6) Camille, who died in youth. Eugene Waggaman was educated at Mount St. Mary's College, Maryland, and graduated from there as valedictorian of the class of 1846. Returning to this State from school, he took charge of his mother's and his own sugar plantation in Jefferson Parish, an
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
e forearm at Winchester, but even while suffering from his inflamed wound continued in command. At Petersburg he led the 2d Brigade in another desperate charge, and again saw perilous action when the brigades were covering the retreat. Then Appomattox and surrender came. There it was Colonel Waggaman's sad honor to surrender all that was left of the 16,000 men who composed the Louisiana brigades. When they had been drawn up in ranks for the ceremony Colonel Waggaman begged of them the privd him to part with a portion of it. That one was the daughter of his old commander—Miss Mildred Lee. He gave her, some twelve years ago, a small piece, including one of the stars, and in return received a splendid portrait of her father. At Appomattox every respect was shown the Louisiana soldiers. At the surrender they marched with heads as erect as ever. When they impinged on the line of the conquering enemy the victors shouldered arms with grave faces, on which was neither smile nor cyn
Fort Warren (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
on all sides. His command, which it may be said in passing, had been ordered forward by a military error, and never for a moment had a ghost of a chance of success, were of course nearly all killed or captured by the formidable line in their immediate front. Those of the 10th who succeeded in stumbling back over the bodies of their fallen comrades owed their escape to the darkness. Colonel Waggaman was captured and with some sixteen others, including Captain I. L. Lyons, was taken to Fort Warren, near Boston, where they remained until exchanged. They were everywhere treated with courtesy, and one pleasant incident, at least, mingled softening remembrances with those of his imprisonment. Just before his capture he had thrown away his sword to prevent surrendering it. This was a weapon valuable both for the quality of its steel, its make and the fact that it had been in use by the family for over 150 years. At the exchange this sword was returned to him by Assistant-Adjutant-Gene
France (France) (search for this): chapter 1.18
under The Oaks. The story is related that Senator Waggaman intended only to wing his antagonist, and it resulted fatally for him. He missed his aim, but Prieur's bullet was more accurate, striking the senator in the leg and severing the femoral artery. The senator never recovered from the injury. He refused to permit the amputation of his leg, and died of gangrene on March 22, 1843. The duel had occurred on the 20th. Had he lived six months longer he would have been sent as minister to France, for such appears to have been President Tyler's intention. Senator Waggaman's children were: (1) Henry St. John, who became a lawyer and died at an early age; (2) Christine, who married Sanfield McDonald, the first prime minister of Ontario, Canada, and who refused the order of knighthood offered by Queen Victoria; (3) Eugene, the subject of the present sketch; (4) Mathilde, who married Judge Henry D. Ogden; (5) Eliza, who married John R. Conway, and (6) Camille, who died in youth. Eu
Balaklava (Ukraine) (search for this): chapter 1.18
rapid in the regiment, where, out of the forty officers allowed it at one time, thirty-one were killed or wounded. So not many months of active service had been seen by the regiment before Captain Waggaman was made lieutenant-colonel, commanding the 10th Louisiana. On the 1st of July, 1862, came the battle of Malvern Hill, and with it came glory and fame to the 10th. The story of the battle is well known, but the account of that charge, less famous, but equally as desperate as that of Balaklava, will bear repetition. The following narrative of it is taken from the Military Record of Louisiana, by the late lamented Napier Bartlett, published some fifteen years ago, viz: A daring attempt in the first place had been made to flank Malvern Hill, but this movement had been met by a superior flanking party of the enemy. The brigade now pressed forward across the open field fronting Malvern Hill, with the ardor of young soldiers panting for their first laurels, and ignorant of the m
Dorchester (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
ame to Louisiana under commission of his majesty of Spain. As his bride, the Baron brought to America, Christine Carbonari, of the celebrated Spinola family. Two daughters were born to this union. One of them married Cyril Arnoult, a merchant of Flanders, who settled in this city, and who participated in the battle of New Orleans. Their daughter, Camille Arnoult, married George Augustus Waggaman. Mr. Waggaman was a Marylander. His forefather, Bartholomew Ennals, had settled in Dorchester, Maryland, shortly after the foundation of the colony by Lord Baltimore. George Augustus Waggaman, the father of the subject of this sketch, speedily became prominent in this State. He was a lawyer and became a judge of the Federal courts. He was then made Secretary of State and held that office for three successive terms. Finally, in 1861, he was elected to the United States Senate for a term of six years. He was a whig, and the leader of his party in this State. He took an active part
1 2 3 4 5 6