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pahannock), shared a similar fate. A label affixed to the coat of one of the murdered men declared that this would be the fate of Mosby and all his men. Since the murder of my men, not less than 700 prisoners, including many officers of high rank, captured from your army by this command, have been forwarded to Richmond; but the execution of my purpose of retaliation was deferred, in order, as far as possible, to confine its operation to the men of Custer and Powell. Accordingly, on the 6th instant, seven of your men were, by my order, executed on the Valley turnpike-your highway of travel. Hereafter, any prisoners falling into my hands will be treated with the kindness due to their condition, unless some new act of barbarity shall compel me reluctantly to adopt a line of policy repugnant to humanity. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, John S. Mosby, Lieutenant-Colonel. We, the committee appointed by Mosby Camp to solicit subscriptions to erect a monument at Front R
sed him, and, screened by the misty dawn, was soon lost to view. When the substitution made by Captain Mountjoy was reported to Mosby, he was much offended, and with severity told him he must remember in future that his command was not a Masonic lodge. A few days after this execution, Colonel Mosby transmitted to General Sheridan the following communication: November 11, 1864. Major-General P. H. Sheridan, Commanding U. S. Forces in the Valley: General,—Sometime in the month of September, during my absence from my command, six of my men, who had been captured by your forces, were hung and shot in the street of Front Royal, by the order and in the immediate presence of Brigadier-General Custer. Since then, another (captured by a Colonel Powell, on a plundering expedition into Rappahannock), shared a similar fate. A label affixed to the coat of one of the murdered men declared that this would be the fate of Mosby and all his men. Since the murder of my men, not less than 7
avy hair floating in the wind, he looked like a knight of old. While I was looking at them, General Custer, at the head of his division, rode by. He was dressed in a splendid suit of silk velvet, his saddle bow bound in silver or gold. In his hand he had a large branch of damsons, which he picked and ate as he rode along, his yellow locks resting upon his shoulders. Rhodes was my friend and playmate, and I saw him shot from a distance, but did not at the time know who it was. Early in November Captain A. E. Richards, with ten men, was sent to the rear of Sheridan's army, then lying between Middletown and Strasburg. From a position near the turnpike, in the course of the day he captured fifteen prisoners, among whom were Captain Brewster, of Custer's staff, and his brother, a lawyer, bound on a canvassing expedition to the army in the interest of General McClellan. There were also among the prisoners a news-boy and a drummer-boy. The news-boy had often before been captured by R
ondition, unless some new act of barbarity shall compel me reluctantly to adopt a line of policy repugnant to humanity. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, John S. Mosby, Lieutenant-Colonel. We, the committee appointed by Mosby Camp to solicit subscriptions to erect a monument at Front Royal, Va., to the memory of our six comrades—Anderson, Carter, Jones, Overby, Love and Rhodes—who, while prisoners of war, were hung or shot to death, by the order of General Custer, in the year 1864. The memory of these brave boys, who met an untimely death in defence of their country, deserves to be perpetuated, and we earnestly appeal to all survivors of the 43rd Battalion, Virginia Cavalry, to aid in rendering long-delayed justice to our fallen comrades. All subscriptions should be sent to the Treasurer, W. Ben. Palmer, No. 1321 Cary street, Richmond, Va., or to any member of the committee. W. Ben. Palmer, Richmond, Va., J. W. Hammond, Alexandria, Va., Robert M. Harrover, Washi
September 19th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1.26
hose who had fallen in the fight, but especially the six soldiers, who, after being taken prisoners, had been made the victims of the implacable ferocity of General George A. Custer, of Sheridan's cavalry. A committee was appointed to raise funds for the erection of a monument to these soldiers, and their appeal is published below. The story of this tragedy is thus told in the Warrenton True Index, by an eye-witness: After the defeat of General Early at the battle of Opequon, on September 19, 1864, his command fell back up the Valley. The brigade of cavalry, under General Wickham, occupied a strong position at Milford, twelve miles south of Front Royal, and Custer made repeated efforts to force him from the position, without effect. About this time it was reported to Captain Chapman, of Mosby's command, that a large wagon train was en route from Milford to Winchester, under the escort of a small body of men. He immediately made disposition for its capture at Front Royal. For
November 11th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1.26
then prepared to die, and striking the guard who held him by the collar a blow which felled him to the ground, rushed passed him, and, screened by the misty dawn, was soon lost to view. When the substitution made by Captain Mountjoy was reported to Mosby, he was much offended, and with severity told him he must remember in future that his command was not a Masonic lodge. A few days after this execution, Colonel Mosby transmitted to General Sheridan the following communication: November 11, 1864. Major-General P. H. Sheridan, Commanding U. S. Forces in the Valley: General,—Sometime in the month of September, during my absence from my command, six of my men, who had been captured by your forces, were hung and shot in the street of Front Royal, by the order and in the immediate presence of Brigadier-General Custer. Since then, another (captured by a Colonel Powell, on a plundering expedition into Rappahannock), shared a similar fate. A label affixed to the coat of one of th
March 14th, 1897 AD (search for this): chapter 1.26
A horror of the war. [from the Richmond, Va., times, March 14, 1897.] How General Custer hung some of Mosby's men. Their comrades wished to raise a monument to the memory of Anderson, love, Carter, Jones, Overby and Rhodes. When Mosby's men met here at the last Confederate Reunion, and feasted and talked of the thrilling events of their lives on the frontier, they did not fail to recall the names of those who had fallen in the fight, but especially the six soldiers, who, after being taken prisoners, had been made the victims of the implacable ferocity of General George A. Custer, of Sheridan's cavalry. A committee was appointed to raise funds for the erection of a monument to these soldiers, and their appeal is published below. The story of this tragedy is thus told in the Warrenton True Index, by an eye-witness: After the defeat of General Early at the battle of Opequon, on September 19, 1864, his command fell back up the Valley. The brigade of cavalry, under Gene
Joseph R. Anderson (search for this): chapter 1.26
[from the Richmond, Va., times, March 14, 1897.] How General Custer hung some of Mosby's men. Their comrades wished to raise a monument to the memory of Anderson, love, Carter, Jones, Overby and Rhodes. When Mosby's men met here at the last Confederate Reunion, and feasted and talked of the thrilling events of their lithe captain, killing him instantly. The most of Mosby's men succeeded in getting away, but some had their horses shot, and others were cut off. Among these were Anderson, Love, Overby, Carter, and Henry Rhodes, of the 23rd Virginia regiment. Custer determined to wreak summary vengeance upon these men. Rhodes was lashed with ropeour town, where one man volunteered to do the killing, and ordered the helpless, dazed prisoner to stand up in front of him while he emptied his pistol upon him. Anderson and Love were shot in a lot behind the courthouse. Overby and Carter were carried to a large walnut tree upon the hill between Front Royal and Riverton, and wer
near the turnpike, in the course of the day he captured fifteen prisoners, among whom were Captain Brewster, of Custer's staff, and his brother, a lawyer, bound on a canvassing expedition to the armyMosby arrived, prepared to enter upon his painful task. There were twenty-seven men left after Brewster, the lawyer, was excluded from the lottery, and on the list were the names of two officers—CaptCaptain Brewster and a lieutenant of artillery. An officer was detailed to superintend the sad affair, and Mosby withdrew from the painful scene, saying: This duty must be performed for the protectiong eye; stolid Indifference; and Fear, with his ashen cheek and trembling hand, were all there. Brewster, the lawyer, was there too, and with agonized looks, was watching the fate of his brother, whilers, in cruel suspense, again stood in line, but now only one death warrant was in the hat. Captain Brewster again escaped, but the artillery officer was not so fortunate. A detail was made to exec
Thomas M. Carter (search for this): chapter 1.26
of Mosby's men. Their comrades wished to raise a monument to the memory of Anderson, love, Carter, Jones, Overby and Rhodes. When Mosby's men met here at the last Confederate Reunion, and feaut some had their horses shot, and others were cut off. Among these were Anderson, Love, Overby, Carter, and Henry Rhodes, of the 23rd Virginia regiment. Custer determined to wreak summary vengeance ied his pistol upon him. Anderson and Love were shot in a lot behind the courthouse. Overby and Carter were carried to a large walnut tree upon the hill between Front Royal and Riverton, and were hunher had to be substituted in his place, for Mosby remembered the blackened corpses of Overby and Carter, as they hung in the parching wind. The prisoners, in cruel suspense, again stood in line, bubscriptions to erect a monument at Front Royal, Va., to the memory of our six comrades—Anderson, Carter, Jones, Overby, Love and Rhodes—who, while prisoners of war, were hung or shot to death, by the
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