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of Scales' brigade, escaped. After the third day's fight the regiment had only about forty men, commanded by a first lieutenant. The two brigades, Lane's and Scales, were reduced to mere squads, and after the retreat, a line was formed again where the first line was formed, and the brigade remained here until the 4th, when the retreat to Hagerstown began, which place was reached on July 7th. On July 11th, line of battle was formed, and the regiment remained here until the night of the 13th, but no fight ensued except skirmishing. After this, the retreat to Falling Water began, Pender's division being rear guard. The Potomac was crossed and Culpeper Court House reached August 1st. The division went into winter quarters at Orange Court House, and the regiment did picket duty on the Rapidan. On the 7th of February, during General Scales' absence, Colonel Hoke commanded the brigade against an advance of the enemy on the brigade picket line at Barnett's Ford on the Rapidan, and
cRae, Co. E, was elected second lieutenant to succeed Lieutenant Copell. On the 10th of February, 1823, the regiment was ordered to proceed to Washington, N. C., but on reaching Goldsboro the order was changed and the regiment ordered to Halifax, thence to Hamilton. On February 12, under orders from General Gatlin, the troops returned to Halifax, and then proceeded to Weldon to defend the bridge at that point, reaching Camp Leavenworth, on the east side of the river near Garysburg, on the 14th. The regiment remained here until the 18th, when it was ordered to Camp Floyd, on the west side of the river, near Weldon. While in camp at this place there was much sickness and many deaths. On the 21st the regiment was ordered to Camp Vance, two miles east of Goldsboro, on the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad, and on the 22nd was attached to the 3rd Brigade, Army of North Carolina, commanded by General Joseph R. Anderson. This brigade was composed of the 1st South Carolina Regiment, Col
mith, Company K, were severely wounded. Hill's Division remained to parole the prisoners and send off the captured goods, and on September 17, moved to Sharpsburg, leaving Thomas at Harper's Ferry. At Sharpsburg occured one of the greatest battles of the civil war. General Hill arrived in time to save the day, but Pender's Brigade on the right of the division was not actively engaged, being under fire at long range of musketry. The division crossed the Potomac into Virginia, and on the 20th, at Shepherdstown, were ordered to drive some brigades of the enemy across the river. The enemy massed in front of Pender's Brigade and endeavored to turn his left. General Pender became hotly engaged and informing Archer of his danger he (Archer) marched by the left flank, and forming on Pender's left, a simultaneous, daring charge was made, and the enemy driven pell mell into the river. Then commenced the most terrible slaughter the war witnessed. The broad surface of the Potomac was bl
nged and the regiment ordered to Halifax, thence to Hamilton. On February 12, under orders from General Gatlin, the troops returned to Halifax, and then proceeded to Weldon to defend the bridge at that point, reaching Camp Leavenworth, on the east side of the river near Garysburg, on the 14th. The regiment remained here until the 18th, when it was ordered to Camp Floyd, on the west side of the river, near Weldon. While in camp at this place there was much sickness and many deaths. On the 21st the regiment was ordered to Camp Vance, two miles east of Goldsboro, on the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad, and on the 22nd was attached to the 3rd Brigade, Army of North Carolina, commanded by General Joseph R. Anderson. This brigade was composed of the 1st South Carolina Regiment, Colonel Hamilton; 34th North Carolina, Colonel Leaventhorpe; 38th North Carolina, Colonel Hoke; 2nd Georgia Battalion, Captain Doyle; 3rd Louisiana Battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Bridford. On April 8th, the 45th
rdonsville, Captain John Ashford was in command of 38th, and received commendation from General Pender for his coolness and skilfulness in handling his men. D. M. McIntyre was now adjutant, having been promoted on July 9th, for gallantry and efficiency. On account of ill-health, Major Andrews resigned his commission, and on the 21st of August, Captain John Ashford was promoted to major. Jackson made a wide circuit behind the mountains to cut the Federal communications at Manassas. On the 26th Pender's Brigade gained a splendid victory over a brigade of the enemy at Manassas Junction. Jackson's single corps, numbering less than 16,000 men was resisting General Pope's entire army. On the 28th the command formed line of battle for the memorable second battle of Manassas, which was a series of battles for three days. Pender's Brigade took possession of the bridge across Bull Run and engaged the enemy across the river. His brigade finally crossed over to the east side, but the enem
omoted on July 9th, for gallantry and efficiency. On account of ill-health, Major Andrews resigned his commission, and on the 21st of August, Captain John Ashford was promoted to major. Jackson made a wide circuit behind the mountains to cut the Federal communications at Manassas. On the 26th Pender's Brigade gained a splendid victory over a brigade of the enemy at Manassas Junction. Jackson's single corps, numbering less than 16,000 men was resisting General Pope's entire army. On the 28th the command formed line of battle for the memorable second battle of Manassas, which was a series of battles for three days. Pender's Brigade took possession of the bridge across Bull Run and engaged the enemy across the river. His brigade finally crossed over to the east side, but the enemy withdrew. The loss was very slight. On Friday, the 29th, the enemy changed position and was attempting to interpose his arms between General Jackson and Alexandria. Jackson's troops were arranged alo
ade of the enemy at Manassas Junction. Jackson's single corps, numbering less than 16,000 men was resisting General Pope's entire army. On the 28th the command formed line of battle for the memorable second battle of Manassas, which was a series of battles for three days. Pender's Brigade took possession of the bridge across Bull Run and engaged the enemy across the river. His brigade finally crossed over to the east side, but the enemy withdrew. The loss was very slight. On Friday, the 29th, the enemy changed position and was attempting to interpose his arms between General Jackson and Alexandria. Jackson's troops were arranged along the Manassas Gap railroad, Jackson's Division under Brigadier General Stark being on the right, Ewell's, under Lawton, in the centre, and A. P. Hill's on the left. The brigades of Thomas, Pender, Archer, and Gregg, were on the extreme left. After Longstreet arrived the enemy changed position and began to concentrate all its force opposite Hill's
February 7th (search for this): chapter 1.27
en the retreat to Hagerstown began, which place was reached on July 7th. On July 11th, line of battle was formed, and the regiment remained here until the night of the 13th, but no fight ensued except skirmishing. After this, the retreat to Falling Water began, Pender's division being rear guard. The Potomac was crossed and Culpeper Court House reached August 1st. The division went into winter quarters at Orange Court House, and the regiment did picket duty on the Rapidan. On the 7th of February, during General Scales' absence, Colonel Hoke commanded the brigade against an advance of the enemy on the brigade picket line at Barnett's Ford on the Rapidan, and it maintained its position until the enemy retired. After the death of Pender at Gettysburg, Wilcox became division commander. On the morning of May 4th, the enemy under General Grant, crossed the Rapidan at Ely's and Germanna Fords. Two corps of Lee's army moved to oppose him, Ewell's by the turnpike and Hill's by the p
February 12th (search for this): chapter 1.27
Co. F, was elected second lieutenant to succeed H. L. Robards; George W. Flowers, Co. G, was elected first lieutenant to succeed Lieutenant Rheim; Oliver H. Patterson, second lieutenant to succeed G. W. Flowers; D. G. McRae, Co. E, was elected second lieutenant to succeed Lieutenant Copell. On the 10th of February, 1823, the regiment was ordered to proceed to Washington, N. C., but on reaching Goldsboro the order was changed and the regiment ordered to Halifax, thence to Hamilton. On February 12, under orders from General Gatlin, the troops returned to Halifax, and then proceeded to Weldon to defend the bridge at that point, reaching Camp Leavenworth, on the east side of the river near Garysburg, on the 14th. The regiment remained here until the 18th, when it was ordered to Camp Floyd, on the west side of the river, near Weldon. While in camp at this place there was much sickness and many deaths. On the 21st the regiment was ordered to Camp Vance, two miles east of Goldsboro
on the right of the break in the line, formed the corps. The North Carolina Regiments, 13th, 22d, 27th and 40th, were thrown out to check the enemy while the other troops endeavored to cross, hoping to rejoin the main army from which the brigades had been separated. It was found impossible to cross, and the regiments thrown out were recalled, when the troops pursued their way up the river until about 2 o'clock at night when they rested. The march was begun at sunrise the next morning, April 3d, and Deep Creek was reached about 9 A. M. A halt was made to let the wagon-train get ahead for safety, and an attempt was made to throw a temporary bridge across the creek in order to cross. The cavalry had been in the rear guard, and about 2 o'clock they came rushing up and reported that the enemy were pursuing. McGowan's brigade was enabled to cross the bridge, which was not yet completed, but the other troops followed the wagons and crossed at a ford about three miles above the bridges
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