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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Farmville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
ng. There was great rejoicing on the part of the soldiers at again meeting their comrades, from whom they had been separated three days. The regiment was halted about sunrise and breakfast was prepared, after which the march was continued to Amelia Courthouse, Va., where the night was spent. The enemy next morning attacked and began burning the wagon-train, but were driven off. The retreat was continued, the rear guard having frequent fights with the enemy. On Friday, April 7, 1865, Farmville, Va., was reached, and Scales' brigade relieved Cook's brigade as rear guard of the infantry. The enemy having crossed the river, pressed the lines very hard and consequently the rear guard was engaged in several attacks and suffered severely. The enemy was driven off, and this was the last fighting in which the regiment was engaged before the surrender. Saturday, April 8th, the regiment camped about three miles from Appomattox Courthouse, Va. As Appomattox Courthouse was approached the
Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
e the first line was formed, and the brigade remained here until the 4th, when the retreat to Hagerstown began, which place was reached on July 7th. On July 11th, line of battle was formed, and the regiment remained here until the night of the 13th, but no fight ensued except skirmishing. After this, the retreat to Falling Water began, Pender's division being rear guard. The Potomac was crossed and Culpeper Court House reached August 1st. The division went into winter quarters at Orange Court House, and the regiment did picket duty on the Rapidan. On the 7th of February, during General Scales' absence, Colonel Hoke commanded the brigade against an advance of the enemy on the brigade picket line at Barnett's Ford on the Rapidan, and it maintained its position until the enemy retired. After the death of Pender at Gettysburg, Wilcox became division commander. On the morning of May 4th, the enemy under General Grant, crossed the Rapidan at Ely's and Germanna Fords. Two corps of
Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
The Thirty-Eighth N. C. Regiment. [from the Charlotte (N. C.) observer, March 31, 1895.] Its history in the Civil war. Lieutenant-Colonel George W. Flowers, of this regiment, writes its splendid record in the army of Northern Virginia—Its Officers—a carefully written and valuable addition to the State's war history. The 38th regiment of North Carolina troops, was formed of volunteers who enlisted for twelve months, and was organized at Camp Mangum, near Raleigh, North Carolina, Je 34th and 38 Regiments of North Carolina Troops, for the promptness and unanimity with which they have re-enlisted for the war. Colonel Hoke, from wounds received in battle, was disabled for field service, and was appointed for the post at Charlotte. Lieutenant-Colonel John Ashford was promoted to the command of the regiment; Major George W. Flowers to be lieutenant-colonel, and Captain J. T. Wilson to be major. The regiment was engaged in a very hard-fought battle at Ream's Station, w
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
on county—John Ashford, captain. First lieutenant, R. Bell; second lieutenant, A. D. King; junior second lieutenant, H. C. Darden. Company E, Richmond Boys, Richmond county—Oliver H. Dockery, captain. First lieutenant, S. M. Ingraham; second lieutenant, D. G. McRae; junior second lieutenant, M. W. Covington. Company F, Catawba pany C— Private Benjamin Sutton, Sampson county; Company D— First Sergeant David A. Thompson, Sampson county; Company E—Private William J. Hutcheson (killed), Richmond county; Company F— Private William S. Huffman, Catawba county; Company G—Private W. F. Matheson, Alexander county; Company H—Corporal D. P. Woodburn. Randolph countparoled prisoner of the Army of Northern Virginia, has permission to go to his home, and there remain undisturbed. Jos. H. Hyman, Colonel 13th N. C. Troops, Commanding Scales' Brigade. The 38th Regiment of North Carolina Troops was disbanded and passed out of existence. [From the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, Sept
Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
The Thirty-Eighth N. C. Regiment. [from the Charlotte (N. C.) observer, March 31, 1895.] Its history in the Civil war. Lieutenant-Colonel George W. Flowers, of this regiment, writes its splendid record in the army of Northern Virginia—Its Officers—a carefully written and valuable addition to the State's war history. The 38th regiment of North Carolina troops, was formed of volunteers who enlisted for twelve months, and was organized at Camp Mangum, near Raleigh, North Carolina, January 17, 1862, under the command of Major J. J. Iredell, commander of the post. The regiment was composed of the following companies: Company A, Spartan Band, Duplin county—A. G. Mosely, captain. First Lieutenant, D. G. Morrisey; second lieutenant, Alsa J. Brown; junior second lieutenant, D. M. Pearsall. Company B, Men of Yadkin, Yadkin county—C. L. Cook, captain. First lieutenant, R. F. Armfield; second lieutenant, A. W. Blackburn; junior second lieutenant, L. F. Haynes. Company C, S
Granville county (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
ieutenant, D. A. Moore. The regiment was organized (Company K being absent) by electing William J. Hoke, Lincoln county (Captain of Company K, Bethel Regiment), colonel. Captain Oliver H. Dockery, Richmond county, lieutenant-colonel; Captain George W. Sharpe, Alexander county, major. The following officers were then appointed: Horace L. Robards, Lincoln county, quartermaster; Benjamin H. Sumner, Lincoln county, commissary; Miles M. Cowles, Yadkin county, adjutant; Peter W. Young, Granville county, surgeon; J. Stuart Devane, Duplin county, assistant surgeon; D. M. McIntyre, Duplin county, sergeant-major; Marion Roseman, Catawba county, quartermaster sergeant; William C. Webb, Cleveland county, commissary sergeant; John O. Waters, Cleveland county, color sergeant; J. J. Johnson, Co. H, S. B. Herring, Co. C, F. A. Clifton, Co. C, J. H. Irving, Co. G, D. A. Black, Co. K, color guard; Rev. Julian P. Faison, Co. A, chaplain; Lieutenant R. W. Copell was elected captain of Co. E, to suc
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
e gained a splendid victory over a brigade of the enemy at Manassas Junction. Jackson's single corps, numbering less than 16,000 men was resisting General Pope's en was attempting to interpose his arms between General Jackson and Alexandria. Jackson's troops were arranged along the Manassas Gap railroad, Jackson's Division undJackson's Division under Brigadier General Stark being on the right, Ewell's, under Lawton, in the centre, and A. P. Hill's on the left. The brigades of Thomas, Pender, Archer, and Greggained some time, when, being promised support from one of the staff in some of Jackson's brigades, I crossed the field to attack the batteries. My men advanced welling a private soldier in Company 1, of the 38th North Carolina Regiment, found Jackson's gloves in the road where he had dropped them when shot. They were buckskin jutant McIntyre and Lieutenant A. J. Brown. When A. P. Hill took command of Jackson's Corps, after recovering from his wound, Pender, also wounded at Chancellorsv
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
t the enemy, who had crossed the Rappahannock at Hamilton's crossing, below Fredericksburg, but the enemy withdrew and no engagement ensued. This was the first time suffering was caused by the extreme cold rains. The command remained near Fredericksburg until May 25th, when it set out on a march, at sunset, in the direction of On December 13th, the army met three divisions of Burnside's army at Fredericksburg, Virginia. At this time, General Hill occupied the front line formed of two regment, with Pender's brigade, went into winter quarters at Camp Gregg, below Fredericksburg, and did picket duty near Moss Creek church. On December 27th, Colonel Wilntil the 28th of April, 1863, when the command marched in the direction of Fredericksburg, and remained in camp below the city until the evening of May 1. On the neral. On the morning of June 6, 1863, the brigade went into line below Fredericksburg, in front of the Bernard house, the enemy being in the Port Royal road and
Halifax, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
G. McRae, Co. E, was elected second lieutenant to succeed Lieutenant Copell. On the 10th of February, 1823, the regiment was ordered to proceed to Washington, N. C., but on reaching Goldsboro the order was changed and the regiment ordered to Halifax, thence to Hamilton. On February 12, under orders from General Gatlin, the troops returned to Halifax, and then proceeded to Weldon to defend the bridge at that point, reaching Camp Leavenworth, on the east side of the river near Garysburg, on Halifax, and then proceeded to Weldon to defend the bridge at that point, reaching Camp Leavenworth, on the east side of the river near Garysburg, on the 14th. The regiment remained here until the 18th, when it was ordered to Camp Floyd, on the west side of the river, near Weldon. While in camp at this place there was much sickness and many deaths. On the 21st the regiment was ordered to Camp Vance, two miles east of Goldsboro, on the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad, and on the 22nd was attached to the 3rd Brigade, Army of North Carolina, commanded by General Joseph R. Anderson. This brigade was composed of the 1st South Carolina Regime
Deep Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
f the break in the line, formed the corps. The North Carolina Regiments, 13th, 22d, 27th and 40th, were thrown out to check the enemy while the other troops endeavored to cross, hoping to rejoin the main army from which the brigades had been separated. It was found impossible to cross, and the regiments thrown out were recalled, when the troops pursued their way up the river until about 2 o'clock at night when they rested. The march was begun at sunrise the next morning, April 3d, and Deep Creek was reached about 9 A. M. A halt was made to let the wagon-train get ahead for safety, and an attempt was made to throw a temporary bridge across the creek in order to cross. The cavalry had been in the rear guard, and about 2 o'clock they came rushing up and reported that the enemy were pursuing. McGowan's brigade was enabled to cross the bridge, which was not yet completed, but the other troops followed the wagons and crossed at a ford about three miles above the bridges. By this time
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