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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Randolph (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
nant, F. D. Roseman. Company G, Rocky Face Rangers, Alexander county—G. W. Sharpe, captain. First lieutenant, John E. Rheim; second lieutenant, George W. Flowers; junior second lieutenant, James W. Stephenson. Company H, Uwharrie Boys, Randolph county—Noah Rush, captain. First lieutenant, L. D. Andrews; second lieutenant, J. N. Kearns; second junior lieutenant, N. H. Hopkins. Company I, Cleveland Marksmen, Cleveland county—O. P. Gardiner, captain. First lieutenant, G. Blanton; secondvid A. Thompson, Sampson county; Company E—Private William J. Hutcheson (killed), Richmond county; Company F— Private William S. Huffman, Catawba county; Company G—Private W. F. Matheson, Alexander county; Company H—Corporal D. P. Woodburn. Randolph county (killed at Gettysburg); Company I-Private Thomas J. Ramsey, Cleveland county; Company K—Private W. H. McPhail, Cumberland county. Medals were also recommended to be given to Adjutant McIntyre and Lieutenant A. J. Brown. When A
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
f Co. E, to succeed Captain Dockery; Lieutenant John E. Rheim, Co. G, was elected to succeed Captain Sharpe; George M. Yoder, Co. F, was elected second lieutenant to succeed H. L. Robards; George W. Flowers, Co. G, was elected first lieutenant to succeed Lieutenant Rheim; Oliver H. Patterson, second lieutenant to succeed G. W. Flowers; D. G. McRae, Co. E, was elected second lieutenant to succeed Lieutenant Copell. On the 10th of February, 1823, the regiment was ordered to proceed to Washington, N. C., but on reaching Goldsboro the order was changed and the regiment ordered to Halifax, thence to Hamilton. On February 12, under orders from General Gatlin, the troops returned to Halifax, and then proceeded to Weldon to defend the bridge at that point, reaching Camp Leavenworth, on the east side of the river near Garysburg, on the 14th. The regiment remained here until the 18th, when it was ordered to Camp Floyd, on the west side of the river, near Weldon. While in camp at this pla
Gaines Mill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
e wornout soldiers slept on their arms. At early dawn the march was begun, the regiment passing over the spot where so many men were lost the evening before. The enemy fled and the Confederates marched through the deserted camp. General Hill in his report, says: It was a costly and useless sacrifice, for early the next morning our troops crossed the mill pond and the Federal forces, seeing their position turned, betook themselves to hasty flight. The Federals made a stand at Gaines' Mill, when the 38th was engaged, and the soldiers, though weary and worn, behaved nobly. About sundown, the shouting along the line announced the fact that the enemy was running and a victory was gained. After camping on the battlefield over night, the march was continued. Lieutenant-Colonel Armfield being sick, Major L. D. Andrews was now in command. The regiment was engaged at Cold Harbor and Frazier's Farm. At the latter place the Confederate troops fought with unusual bravery, not see
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
the city until the evening of May 1. On the morning of May 2 Jackson began to march upon Chancellorsville, and after a long and fatiguing journey the division was placed at right angles to the old in the road the whole brigade received a most destructive shelling from the batteries near Chancellorsville. Hill's Division was now in front, and was engaged in relieving those who had been in the und their colors. Jackson, accompanied by his staff and escort, rode down the road towards Chancellorsville. In the obscurity of the night they were mistaken for the enemy and fired upon, and Jacksol took command of Jackson's Corps, after recovering from his wound, Pender, also wounded at Chancellorsville, was promoted to major-general, and Colonel A. M. Scales, the senior colonel of the brigade, to brigadier-general. Scales being absent on account of a wound received at Chancellorsville, Colonel W. J. Hoke was placed in command of the brigade and continued in command until Scales rejoined
Shenandoah (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
the army bivouacked near the Big Spring, between Leesburg and the Potomac, and on the next day the division crossed into Maryland, near Leesburg, but on the 11th re-crossed into Virginia at Williamsport. On the next day General White, with 3,000 men, retreated from the town and fell back upon Harper's Ferry. The enemy occupied a ridge of hills, known as Bolivar Heights, extending from the Potomac to the Shenandoah. General Hill's division was ordered to move along the left bank of the Shenandoah to turn the left flank of the enemy and enter Harper's Ferry. The 38th was in the left of the division. Pender, Archer and Brockenbrough were directed to gain the crest of the hill, General Pender being entrusted with the execution of this command. Colonel Brewster was in charge of the brigade, which advanced to within about sixty yards of the breastworks on the west point of Bolivar Heights, but the troops were withdrawn. Next morning the brigades of Pender and Thomas marched to withi
Cumberland County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
second junior lieutenant, N. H. Hopkins. Company I, Cleveland Marksmen, Cleveland county—O. P. Gardiner, captain. First lieutenant, G. Blanton; second lieutenant, D. Magness; junior second lieutenant, O. Beam. Company K, Carolina Boys, Cumberland county—M. McR. McLaughlin, captain. First lieutenant, Angus Shaw; second lieutenant, A. M. Smith; junior second lieutenant, D. A. Moore. The regiment was organized (Company K being absent) by electing William J. Hoke, Lincoln county (Captain Huffman, Catawba county; Company G—Private W. F. Matheson, Alexander county; Company H—Corporal D. P. Woodburn. Randolph county (killed at Gettysburg); Company I-Private Thomas J. Ramsey, Cleveland county; Company K—Private W. H. McPhail, Cumberland county. Medals were also recommended to be given to Adjutant McIntyre and Lieutenant A. J. Brown. When A. P. Hill took command of Jackson's Corps, after recovering from his wound, Pender, also wounded at Chancellorsville, was promoted to
Potomac River (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
e two brigades, Lane's and Scales, were reduced to mere squads, and after the retreat, a line was formed again where the first line was formed, and the brigade remained here until the 4th, when the retreat to Hagerstown began, which place was reached on July 7th. On July 11th, line of battle was formed, and the regiment remained here until the night of the 13th, but no fight ensued except skirmishing. After this, the retreat to Falling Water began, Pender's division being rear guard. The Potomac was crossed and Culpeper Court House reached August 1st. The division went into winter quarters at Orange Court House, and the regiment did picket duty on the Rapidan. On the 7th of February, during General Scales' absence, Colonel Hoke commanded the brigade against an advance of the enemy on the brigade picket line at Barnett's Ford on the Rapidan, and it maintained its position until the enemy retired. After the death of Pender at Gettysburg, Wilcox became division commander. On t
Gordonsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
enemy was continued, and the next engagement was at Malvern Hill. The battle at this place was a very hard fought one, but the 38th was not in the thickest of it, and did not lose very heavily. The enemy continued to flee, and were pursued to their gun-boats at Harrison's Landing. After remaining there a few days, the division was ordered to Richmond, and it remained below that city until July 27, when General A. P. Hill's division was attached to Jackson's corps, and marched to Gordonsville, Virginia. On August 7th, Jackson moved from Gordonsville, to confront General Pope in the Valley, and on the 9th he fell upon General Banks' right flank at Cedar Mountain. At one time the day seemed doubtful. When the foe had well nigh crushed General Garnett, Branch went gallantly to his rescue, and with Pender's and other brigades of Hill's division, drove the enemy headlong from the field. Major Andrews having taken sick at Gordonsville, Captain John Ashford was in command of 38th, and
Yadkin (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
. G. Mosely, captain. First Lieutenant, D. G. Morrisey; second lieutenant, Alsa J. Brown; junior second lieutenant, D. M. Pearsall. Company B, Men of Yadkin, Yadkin county—C. L. Cook, captain. First lieutenant, R. F. Armfield; second lieutenant, A. W. Blackburn; junior second lieutenant, L. F. Haynes. Company C, Sampson Farmers The following officers were then appointed: Horace L. Robards, Lincoln county, quartermaster; Benjamin H. Sumner, Lincoln county, commissary; Miles M. Cowles, Yadkin county, adjutant; Peter W. Young, Granville county, surgeon; J. Stuart Devane, Duplin county, assistant surgeon; D. M. McIntyre, Duplin county, sergeant-major; Marionfter the battle of Chancellorsville the following were given badges: Company A—Private Jesse A. Nethercutt, Duplin county; Company B—Private Thomas Dinkins, Yadkin county; Company C— Private Benjamin Sutton, Sampson county; Company D— First Sergeant David A. Thompson, Sampson county; Company E—Private William J. Hutcheson (
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
nant Smith, Company K, were severely wounded. Hill's Division remained to parole the prisoners and send off the captured goods, and on September 17, moved to Sharpsburg, leaving Thomas at Harper's Ferry. At Sharpsburg occured one of the greatest battles of the civil war. General Hill arrived in time to save the day, but PenderSharpsburg occured one of the greatest battles of the civil war. General Hill arrived in time to save the day, but Pender's Brigade on the right of the division was not actively engaged, being under fire at long range of musketry. The division crossed the Potomac into Virginia, and on the 20th, at Shepherdstown, were ordered to drive some brigades of the enemy across the river. The enemy massed in front of Pender's Brigade and endeavored to turnd no man can say that the Light Division was ever broken. You held the left at Manassas against overwhelming numbers, and saved the army. You saved the day at Sharpsburg, and at Shepherdstown you were selected to face a storm of round shot, shell and grape, such as I never before saw. I am proud to say to you that your services
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