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ion of States it supported, and how, from that wreck, has arisen the now well-known Southern Railway, permeating every Southern State! Can the growth of that system in any way be attributed to the rapid growth and improvement of the South, and can we paint the picture of the two eras as having any connection? But to our story: It is well remembered by all who lived in the closing days of the Confederacy that the first official news of the intended evacuation of Richmond on that Sunday in April was communicated to its citizens in church, and through the hurried calling of the President from church. Our first intimation of it was not in being called from church, but at noon on that quiet Sabbath day in Danville, for it was quiet there, 140 miles away from the city, which was so soon to witness the saddest scene in its history. On being awakened from a sound sleep, the first I had enjoyed for twenty-four hours (for in those days a railroad-man slept when he could, and that was n
man the trains and engines, and none of the men who worked for Major Wright in the operations of those roads for the succeeding ninety days will ever forget the uniform kindness of himself and his assistants. When the corps was ordered to the frontiers of Texas, in anticipation of trouble with the French in Mexico, the writer and many of his assistants were urged to go with them. We wanted rest, many of us had families in the South that we had not seen for months, and in the latter part of July we disbanded, as it were, and to-day we are like the survivors in gray—scattered. Two of the engineers who did faithful service to the Confederacy, and one or more of the conductors who served with me in those trying days, are now trusted employees of the Nashville, Chattanooga and St. Louis Railway. We are two small a body to think of reunions. We sometimes meet, not as ships that pass in the night, but on the car or around the engine of to-day, and discuss those old days of the past—th
illed at the Wilderness in 1864. Cunningham, W. H., died in prison. Dowdy, John M., died in 1861. Dowdy, E. E., died in 1862. Dowdy, John D., died in prison. Dowdy, James, killed at Cedllorsville, and died since the war. Flippen, Allen, died in 1862. Flippen, William, died in 1861. Godsey, Daniel L., died since the war. Garnett, Robert K., killed at Gettysburg. Garnett, James S., lost a leg; since died. Hendrick, Merritt S., died in 1861. Hatcher, Joseph, died in 1862. Harris, Joseph N., died since the war. Jones, Levi, died since the war. King, Geoed at Gettysburg and died since. Meador, Mike, died since the war. Meador, John L., died in 1861. Parker, Thomas, died in 1861. Parker, Jerry, died since the war. Parker, I. A., died si1861. Parker, Jerry, died since the war. Parker, I. A., died since the war. Price, John B., killed at Cedar Mountain. Snoddy, John S., died since the war. Shores, Thomas, died since the war. Wootton, John and A. W., died since the war. Number kille
July 1st, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.28
The Cumberland Grays, Company D, Twenty-first Virginia Infantry. Its Roster, with brief record of its service. Cumberland C. H. Va., September 11, 1897. There was a reunion of the Cumberland Grays' Association at Cumberland Courthouse recently. This company was commanded first by Captain F. D. Irving, who was in command of it from the 1st of July, 1861, to the 21st of April, 1862, when he refused reelection and retired from service. Captain A. C. Page was elected its second captain, and was wounded at the battle of Sharpsburg. His leg was amputated, and he was retired from the service. At the earnest solicitation of Charles H. Anderson, the first lieutenant of the company, second lieutenant John A. Booker, who was on detached duty as A. A. A. General to General J. R. Jones, was appointed captain, and remained as such until the end of the war. In the second fight at Manassas the ammunition of the regiment gave out, but our second lieutenant was a brick-layer, a
Anderson, died at Valley Mountain. Sergeant Bolden Brown, died in 1862. Sergeant D. M. Coleman, killed at Fisher's Hill. Corporal W. Baughan, W. L., died since the war. Baughan, William, died in 1862. Baughan, David, killed at Gettysburg. Baughan, Robert, mortal. D., killed at Monocacy, Md. Coleman, W. A., died at Staunton in 1862. Creasy, Edward, killed at the Wilderness in 1864. Cunningham,in prison. Dowdy, John M., died in 1861. Dowdy, E. E., died in 1862. Dowdy, John D., died in prison. Dowdy, James, killed at Cedaruntain. Dowdy, Wilson M., while in the hospital at Winchester, in 1862, hearing that his company was in a heavy engagement, seized a musketChancellorsville, and died since the war. Flippen, Allen, died in 1862. Flippen, William, died in 1861. Godsey, Daniel L., died since. Hendrick, Merritt S., died in 1861. Hatcher, Joseph, died in 1862. Harris, Joseph N., died since the war. Jones, Levi, died sinc
April 21st, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.28
The Cumberland Grays, Company D, Twenty-first Virginia Infantry. Its Roster, with brief record of its service. Cumberland C. H. Va., September 11, 1897. There was a reunion of the Cumberland Grays' Association at Cumberland Courthouse recently. This company was commanded first by Captain F. D. Irving, who was in command of it from the 1st of July, 1861, to the 21st of April, 1862, when he refused reelection and retired from service. Captain A. C. Page was elected its second captain, and was wounded at the battle of Sharpsburg. His leg was amputated, and he was retired from the service. At the earnest solicitation of Charles H. Anderson, the first lieutenant of the company, second lieutenant John A. Booker, who was on detached duty as A. A. A. General to General J. R. Jones, was appointed captain, and remained as such until the end of the war. In the second fight at Manassas the ammunition of the regiment gave out, but our second lieutenant was a brick-layer, a
Anderson, Meredith, killed at Kernstown. Austin, M. G., wounded at Gettysburg, and died. Booker, Charles W., died since the war. Baughan, W. L., died since the war. Baughan, William, died in 1862. Baughan, David, killed at Gettysburg. Baughan, Robert, mortally wounded at Petersburg. Cooke, S. W., wounded at Mine Run and died since the war. Coleman, W. D., killed at Monocacy, Md. Coleman, W. A., died at Staunton in 1862. Creasy, Edward, killed at the Wilderness in 1864. Cunningham, W. H., died in prison. Dowdy, John M., died in 1861. Dowdy, E. E., died in 1862. Dowdy, John D., died in prison. Dowdy, James, killed at Cedar Mountain. Dowdy, Wilson M., while in the hospital at Winchester, in 1862, hearing that his company was in a heavy engagement, seized a musket, and running at a double-quick, fainted, fell, and in two days a little mound was raised to mark the spot where this gallant soldier sleeps. Dunford, John F., killed at Gettysbur
July 4th, 1897 AD (search for this): chapter 1.28
John B., killed at Cedar Mountain. Snoddy, John S., died since the war. Shores, Thomas, died since the war. Wootton, John and A. W., died since the war. Number killed during the war16 Number died during the war18 Number died since the war21 Number still living48 —— Total103 There were twenty-eight wounded and five who lost limbs during the war, and one had his leg, which was wounded, amputated since the war. Richmond, Virginia. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, July 4, 1897.] the evacuation of the City and the days preceding it. How the news was received in Danville—Some of the closing scenes of the Confederacy vividly recalled. Colonel J. H. Averill in Nashville Banner. The coming of the remnants of that army in gray, whose deeds so astonished the world a third of a century ago, and the presence among us here of the last survivor of the cabinet of President Davis, brings vividly back some of the closing scenes of the Southern Confederacy, in which t<
September 11th, 1897 AD (search for this): chapter 1.28
The Cumberland Grays, Company D, Twenty-first Virginia Infantry. Its Roster, with brief record of its service. Cumberland C. H. Va., September 11, 1897. There was a reunion of the Cumberland Grays' Association at Cumberland Courthouse recently. This company was commanded first by Captain F. D. Irving, who was in command of it from the 1st of July, 1861, to the 21st of April, 1862, when he refused reelection and retired from service. Captain A. C. Page was elected its second captain, and was wounded at the battle of Sharpsburg. His leg was amputated, and he was retired from the service. At the earnest solicitation of Charles H. Anderson, the first lieutenant of the company, second lieutenant John A. Booker, who was on detached duty as A. A. A. General to General J. R. Jones, was appointed captain, and remained as such until the end of the war. In the second fight at Manassas the ammunition of the regiment gave out, but our second lieutenant was a brick-layer, a
William Allen (search for this): chapter 1.28
dar Mountain. Dowdy, Wilson M., while in the hospital at Winchester, in 1862, hearing that his company was in a heavy engagement, seized a musket, and running at a double-quick, fainted, fell, and in two days a little mound was raised to mark the spot where this gallant soldier sleeps. Dunford, John F., killed at Gettysburg. Edwards, Thomas, died in hospital. Flippen, Charles, killed at Kernstown. Flippen, J. T., wounded at Chancellorsville, and died since the war. Flippen, Allen, died in 1862. Flippen, William, died in 1861. Godsey, Daniel L., died since the war. Garnett, Robert K., killed at Gettysburg. Garnett, James S., lost a leg; since died. Hendrick, Merritt S., died in 1861. Hatcher, Joseph, died in 1862. Harris, Joseph N., died since the war. Jones, Levi, died since the war. King, George H., was the last man killed at Gettysburg in his company, a few yards from the enemy's line. Merryman, James, died soon after the war. Mahr,
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