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E. E. England (search for this): chapter 1.28
effectually that the entire brigade in an instant took up the same weapons. With what effect, history has told. At the roll-call of the company at the reunion it was seen that of the 103 officers and men who were enlisted only forty-eight were living. The following is a list of those who were killed or died since and during the war: Captain F. D. Irving, died since the war. Captain A. C. Page, died since the war. Lieutenant C. H. Anderson, killed at Fisher's Hill. Lieutenant E. E. England, killed at Petersburg. Sergeant-Major William Denny, died since the war. Sergeant M. J. Dunkum, died since the war; lost a leg at Brandy Station. Sergeant W. S. Anderson, died at Valley Mountain. Sergeant Bolden Brown, died in 1862. Sergeant D. M. Coleman, killed at Fisher's Hill. Corporal W. M. Cooke, wounded; died since the war. Privates. Ayres, T. J., wounded; died since the war. Anderson, Meredith, killed at Kernstown. Austin, M. G., wounded at Get
David B. Harris (search for this): chapter 1.28
gallant soldier sleeps. Dunford, John F., killed at Gettysburg. Edwards, Thomas, died in hospital. Flippen, Charles, killed at Kernstown. Flippen, J. T., wounded at Chancellorsville, and died since the war. Flippen, Allen, died in 1862. Flippen, William, died in 1861. Godsey, Daniel L., died since the war. Garnett, Robert K., killed at Gettysburg. Garnett, James S., lost a leg; since died. Hendrick, Merritt S., died in 1861. Hatcher, Joseph, died in 1862. Harris, Joseph N., died since the war. Jones, Levi, died since the war. King, George H., was the last man killed at Gettysburg in his company, a few yards from the enemy's line. Merryman, James, died soon after the war. Mahr, J. C. L., killed at Kernstown. Meador, Robert J., wounded at Gettysburg and died since. Meador, Mike, died since the war. Meador, John L., died in 1861. Parker, Thomas, died in 1861. Parker, Jerry, died since the war. Parker, I. A., died since the
Charles H. Anderson (search for this): chapter 1.28
he refused reelection and retired from service. Captain A. C. Page was elected its second captain, and was wounded at the battle of Sharpsburg. His leg was amputated, and he was retired from the service. At the earnest solicitation of Charles H. Anderson, the first lieutenant of the company, second lieutenant John A. Booker, who was on detached duty as A. A. A. General to General J. R. Jones, was appointed captain, and remained as such until the end of the war. In the second fight at Maers and men who were enlisted only forty-eight were living. The following is a list of those who were killed or died since and during the war: Captain F. D. Irving, died since the war. Captain A. C. Page, died since the war. Lieutenant C. H. Anderson, killed at Fisher's Hill. Lieutenant E. E. England, killed at Petersburg. Sergeant-Major William Denny, died since the war. Sergeant M. J. Dunkum, died since the war; lost a leg at Brandy Station. Sergeant W. S. Anderson, d
d, killed at the Wilderness in 1864. Cunningham, W. H., died in prison. Dowdy, John M., died in 1861. Dowdy, E. E., died in 1862. Dowdy, John D., died in prison. Dowdy, James, killed at Cedar Mountain. Dowdy, Wilson M., while in the hospital at Winchester, in 1862, hearing that his company was in a heavy engagement, seized a musket, and running at a double-quick, fainted, fell, and in two days a little mound was raised to mark the spot where this gallant soldier sleeps. Dunford, John F., killed at Gettysburg. Edwards, Thomas, died in hospital. Flippen, Charles, killed at Kernstown. Flippen, J. T., wounded at Chancellorsville, and died since the war. Flippen, Allen, died in 1862. Flippen, William, died in 1861. Godsey, Daniel L., died since the war. Garnett, Robert K., killed at Gettysburg. Garnett, James S., lost a leg; since died. Hendrick, Merritt S., died in 1861. Hatcher, Joseph, died in 1862. Harris, Joseph N., died since the
J. W. T. Lee (search for this): chapter 1.28
le; send nothing out. Having heard nothing of impending danger to Lee's army, or of the probability of the evacuation, I asked the reason We then knew all in regard to the evacuation of Petersburg, and that Lee and his generals, with that gallant remnant of our Army of Northern we could. Our first train was ready when the order came to hold it. Lee had not been heard from. The next we heard it was too late; he had ant superintendent came up and said: John, come here. I joined him. Lee has surrendered. I felt as though the ground had opened up under me well populated. The news of the fall of Richmond, the surrender of Lee, and the flight of the Confederate Government had been carried to thd Danville; in fact, they had been coming daily since the retreat of Lee from Petersburg. With the dawn of day women and children, old and yween Danville and this point for several days after the surrender of Lee's army, bringing in the men as fast as they came there, wending thei
A. W. Edwards (search for this): chapter 1.28
ningham, W. H., died in prison. Dowdy, John M., died in 1861. Dowdy, E. E., died in 1862. Dowdy, John D., died in prison. Dowdy, James, killed at Cedar Mountain. Dowdy, Wilson M., while in the hospital at Winchester, in 1862, hearing that his company was in a heavy engagement, seized a musket, and running at a double-quick, fainted, fell, and in two days a little mound was raised to mark the spot where this gallant soldier sleeps. Dunford, John F., killed at Gettysburg. Edwards, Thomas, died in hospital. Flippen, Charles, killed at Kernstown. Flippen, J. T., wounded at Chancellorsville, and died since the war. Flippen, Allen, died in 1862. Flippen, William, died in 1861. Godsey, Daniel L., died since the war. Garnett, Robert K., killed at Gettysburg. Garnett, James S., lost a leg; since died. Hendrick, Merritt S., died in 1861. Hatcher, Joseph, died in 1862. Harris, Joseph N., died since the war. Jones, Levi, died since the war.
F. D. Irving (search for this): chapter 1.28
fantry. Its Roster, with brief record of its service. Cumberland C. H. Va., September 11, 1897. There was a reunion of the Cumberland Grays' Association at Cumberland Courthouse recently. This company was commanded first by Captain F. D. Irving, who was in command of it from the 1st of July, 1861, to the 21st of April, 1862, when he refused reelection and retired from service. Captain A. C. Page was elected its second captain, and was wounded at the battle of Sharpsburg. His s told. At the roll-call of the company at the reunion it was seen that of the 103 officers and men who were enlisted only forty-eight were living. The following is a list of those who were killed or died since and during the war: Captain F. D. Irving, died since the war. Captain A. C. Page, died since the war. Lieutenant C. H. Anderson, killed at Fisher's Hill. Lieutenant E. E. England, killed at Petersburg. Sergeant-Major William Denny, died since the war. Sergeant M.
an killed at Gettysburg in his company, a few yards from the enemy's line. Merryman, James, died soon after the war. Mahr, J. C. L., killed at Kernstown. Meador, Robert J., wounded at Gettysburg and died since. Meador, Mike, died since the war. Meador, John L., died in 1861. Parker, Thomas, died in 1861. ParkeMeador, Mike, died since the war. Meador, John L., died in 1861. Parker, Thomas, died in 1861. Parker, Jerry, died since the war. Parker, I. A., died since the war. Price, John B., killed at Cedar Mountain. Snoddy, John S., died since the war. Shores, Thomas, died since the war. Wootton, John and A. W., died since the war. Number killed during the war16 Number died during the war18 Number died since the war21Meador, John L., died in 1861. Parker, Thomas, died in 1861. Parker, Jerry, died since the war. Parker, I. A., died since the war. Price, John B., killed at Cedar Mountain. Snoddy, John S., died since the war. Shores, Thomas, died since the war. Wootton, John and A. W., died since the war. Number killed during the war16 Number died during the war18 Number died since the war21 Number still living48 —— Total103 There were twenty-eight wounded and five who lost limbs during the war, and one had his leg, which was wounded, amputated since the war. Richmond, Virginia. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, July 4, 1897.] the evacuation of the City and the days preceding it. How the news was r
since the war. King, George H., was the last man killed at Gettysburg in his company, a few yards from the enemy's line. Merryman, James, died soon after the war. Mahr, J. C. L., killed at Kernstown. Meador, Robert J., wounded at Gettysburg and died since. Meador, Mike, died since the war. Meador, John L., died in 1861. Parker, Thomas, died in 1861. Parker, Jerry, died since the war. Parker, I. A., died since the war. Price, John B., killed at Cedar Mountain. Snoddy, John S., died since the war. Shores, Thomas, died since the war. Wootton, John and A. W., died since the war. Number killed during the war16 Number died during the war18 Number died since the war21 Number still living48 —— Total103 There were twenty-eight wounded and five who lost limbs during the war, and one had his leg, which was wounded, amputated since the war. Richmond, Virginia. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, July 4, 1897.] the evacuation of the City and t
oaching on the north bank of the river; that they were arranging to rebuild the bridge, and were crossing the river on a pontoon, en route for Danville, and to operate against Johnston's army. The superintendent ordered the trains withdrawn, and I was instructed to take all of the rolling stock of the 4-feet 8 1/2-inch gauge, go to Greensboro, report to General Johnston, and follow the fortunes of that army. Peace negotiations. Peace negotiations were in progress between Johnston and Sherman. I was advised the evening previous that the surrender would be officially announced in the morning. Calling all of our men together, the information was given them, and I was unanimously asked to take them all back to Danville at once. Engines were gotten ready, and sitting on the pilot of the leading one, soon after night, I had my first sight of the camp-fires of the Fifth Army Corps, encamped around Danville. Soon we stopped at the picket lines, and an officer was interviewed. He w
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