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Burkeville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
of the probability of the evacuation, I asked the reason for the order. None was given, and our construction of it then was that Richmond had news of a raid out from the Federal army, and that it was feared that our lines would be cut between Burkeville and the Staunton river. We took our local wire and interrogated the operators on the line for news of the raiders, but they knew nothing. It was time for the regular passenger train to leave for Richmond. Many passengers were gathering, anrtermaster of the 5th Army Corps. Numerous questions were put and answered in regard to the Richmond and Danville and Piedmont roads and its rolling stock, and we were astonished to be asked to gather our men and open up communications between Burkeville and Danville and Greensboroa, for the purpose of handling supplies for the Federal army at Greensboroa and Danville, and other purposes. We were told to take our own men to man the trains and engines, and none of the men who worked for Major
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 1.28
Burkeville and Danville and Greensboroa, for the purpose of handling supplies for the Federal army at Greensboroa and Danville, and other purposes. We were told to take our own men to man the trains and engines, and none of the men who worked for Major Wright in the operations of those roads for the succeeding ninety days will ever forget the uniform kindness of himself and his assistants. When the corps was ordered to the frontiers of Texas, in anticipation of trouble with the French in Mexico, the writer and many of his assistants were urged to go with them. We wanted rest, many of us had families in the South that we had not seen for months, and in the latter part of July we disbanded, as it were, and to-day we are like the survivors in gray—scattered. Two of the engineers who did faithful service to the Confederacy, and one or more of the conductors who served with me in those trying days, are now trusted employees of the Nashville, Chattanooga and St. Louis Railway. We ar
Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
South. Soon, however, we had the wires in working order, but the dawn of day brought other trouble to us in Danville, and we gave very little thought to the Greensboroa end. Shifting the scene, I come down to the picturesque old town of Washington, Ga., where recently I had pointed out the house in which President Davis and his party stopped on their retreat. Here was held the last official meeting of the Confederate government; here the President and his Cabinet gave up the cause as lost, and each member undertook to provide as best he could for his own safety. Had I the notes of the memorable journey from Danville to Washington, Ga., the meeting with Johnston at Greensboroa, pages could be written of this meeting. The journey from Greensboroa to Charlotte, the flight from that point through South Carolina, and last, that final meeting at Washington, are all events of greatest interest, and columns could be written; but these notes cannot be obtained in time for this article
Cedar Mountain (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
died at Staunton in 1862. Creasy, Edward, killed at the Wilderness in 1864. Cunningham, W. H., died in prison. Dowdy, John M., died in 1861. Dowdy, E. E., died in 1862. Dowdy, John D., died in prison. Dowdy, James, killed at Cedar Mountain. Dowdy, Wilson M., while in the hospital at Winchester, in 1862, hearing that his company was in a heavy engagement, seized a musket, and running at a double-quick, fainted, fell, and in two days a little mound was raised to mark the spot ded at Gettysburg and died since. Meador, Mike, died since the war. Meador, John L., died in 1861. Parker, Thomas, died in 1861. Parker, Jerry, died since the war. Parker, I. A., died since the war. Price, John B., killed at Cedar Mountain. Snoddy, John S., died since the war. Shores, Thomas, died since the war. Wootton, John and A. W., died since the war. Number killed during the war16 Number died during the war18 Number died since the war21 Number still living4
Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
ly I had pointed out the house in which President Davis and his party stopped on their retreat. Here was held the last official meeting of the Confederate government; here the President and his Cabinet gave up the cause as lost, and each member undertook to provide as best he could for his own safety. Had I the notes of the memorable journey from Danville to Washington, Ga., the meeting with Johnston at Greensboroa, pages could be written of this meeting. The journey from Greensboroa to Charlotte, the flight from that point through South Carolina, and last, that final meeting at Washington, are all events of greatest interest, and columns could be written; but these notes cannot be obtained in time for this article. An explosion. But to resume our story at Danville. As stated before, there were warehouses filled with provisions, stores, etc., for the army. The neighboring hills of Virginia and North Carolina and the valley of the River Dan were well populated. The news of
Staunton River, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
f the evacuation, I asked the reason for the order. None was given, and our construction of it then was that Richmond had news of a raid out from the Federal army, and that it was feared that our lines would be cut between Burkeville and the Staunton river. We took our local wire and interrogated the operators on the line for news of the raiders, but they knew nothing. It was time for the regular passenger train to leave for Richmond. Many passengers were gathering, and the question was frvacuation; the men had been gradually leaving us, and all belonging in Richmond were soon en route, walking the long, dreary 140 miles to try and find their loved ones. A couple of days after the evacuation of Richmond the bridge over the Staunton river had been burned. We maintained train service between Danville and this point for several days after the surrender of Lee's army, bringing in the men as fast as they came there, wending their way to their, in many cases, desolate homes in the
Mine Run (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
Sergeant D. M. Coleman, killed at Fisher's Hill. Corporal W. M. Cooke, wounded; died since the war. Privates. Ayres, T. J., wounded; died since the war. Anderson, Meredith, killed at Kernstown. Austin, M. G., wounded at Gettysburg, and died. Booker, Charles W., died since the war. Baughan, W. L., died since the war. Baughan, William, died in 1862. Baughan, David, killed at Gettysburg. Baughan, Robert, mortally wounded at Petersburg. Cooke, S. W., wounded at Mine Run and died since the war. Coleman, W. D., killed at Monocacy, Md. Coleman, W. A., died at Staunton in 1862. Creasy, Edward, killed at the Wilderness in 1864. Cunningham, W. H., died in prison. Dowdy, John M., died in 1861. Dowdy, E. E., died in 1862. Dowdy, John D., died in prison. Dowdy, James, killed at Cedar Mountain. Dowdy, Wilson M., while in the hospital at Winchester, in 1862, hearing that his company was in a heavy engagement, seized a musket, and running at
Greensboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
en days immediately following. The writer was at the time trainmaster of the Richmond and Danville Railroad, and stationed at Danville, Va., the road then running only from Richmond to Danville, there connecting with the Piedmont road to Greensboro, N. C. How this railroad line, then the mainstay of the Southern Confederacy, the only line of communication between its capital and the Southern States, has grown and extended its lines; how the old Richmond and Danville went down, as the Confeded were crossing the river on a pontoon, en route for Danville, and to operate against Johnston's army. The superintendent ordered the trains withdrawn, and I was instructed to take all of the rolling stock of the 4-feet 8 1/2-inch gauge, go to Greensboro, report to General Johnston, and follow the fortunes of that army. Peace negotiations. Peace negotiations were in progress between Johnston and Sherman. I was advised the evening previous that the surrender would be officially announced
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
ed to the ceiling, as well as many loaded cars, awaiting shipment. Trains of supplies were made up, but it was slow work. The yard was crowded with cars. Cabinet Ministers and their families and other prominent people, living in box cars, were in our way, and we could not get rid of them, but did the best we could. Our first train was ready when the order came to hold it. Lee had not been heard from. The next we heard it was too late; he had crossed the road, going in the direction of Appomattox, and no provisions in sight to feed the starving soldiers, while there were thousands of rations in the storehouses and cars in Danville, soon to be raided and plundered by a mob. Some one blundered Time passed rapidly. There was no opportunity for sleep or rest. I was in the yard busily engaged in getting a train off for Greensboroa. The assistant superintendent came up and said: John, come here. I joined him. Lee has surrendered. I felt as though the ground had opened up under me. H
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
es could be written of this meeting. The journey from Greensboroa to Charlotte, the flight from that point through South Carolina, and last, that final meeting at Washington, are all events of greatest interest, and columns could be written; but these notes cannot be obtained in time for this article. An explosion. But to resume our story at Danville. As stated before, there were warehouses filled with provisions, stores, etc., for the army. The neighboring hills of Virginia and North Carolina and the valley of the River Dan were well populated. The news of the fall of Richmond, the surrender of Lee, and the flight of the Confederate Government had been carried to them. Many stragglers from the army had already reached Danville; in fact, they had been coming daily since the retreat of Lee from Petersburg. With the dawn of day women and children, old and young, began to pour in from the surrounding country and congregated in crowds around the warehouses. There was a rear gu
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