hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Stonewall Jackson 260 0 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 201 9 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 118 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes 112 0 Browse Search
Danville (Virginia, United States) 98 2 Browse Search
Sam Davis 94 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 92 8 Browse Search
United States (United States) 90 0 Browse Search
Judah Phillips Benjamin 84 0 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 77 7 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 249 total hits in 74 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
Number died during the war18 Number died since the war21 Number still living48 —— Total103 There were twenty-eight wounded and five who lost limbs during the war, and one had his leg, which was wounded, amputated since the war. Richmond, Virginia. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, July 4, 1897.] the evacuation of the City and the days preceding it. How the news was received in Danville—Some of the closing scenes of the Confederacy vividly recalled. Colonel J. H. Averill in NaRichmond, Va., Dispatch, July 4, 1897.] the evacuation of the City and the days preceding it. How the news was received in Danville—Some of the closing scenes of the Confederacy vividly recalled. Colonel J. H. Averill in Nashville Banner. The coming of the remnants of that army in gray, whose deeds so astonished the world a third of a century ago, and the presence among us here of the last survivor of the cabinet of President Davis, brings vividly back some of the closing scenes of the Southern Confederacy, in which the writer participated, and which were several years since written out, and are here retold at the request of the Banner. The scene I will describe pertains to the evacuation of Richmond and t
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
t Davis and his party stopped on their retreat. Here was held the last official meeting of the Confederate government; here the President and his Cabinet gave up the cause as lost, and each member undertook to provide as best he could for his own safety. Had I the notes of the memorable journey from Danville to Washington, Ga., the meeting with Johnston at Greensboroa, pages could be written of this meeting. The journey from Greensboroa to Charlotte, the flight from that point through South Carolina, and last, that final meeting at Washington, are all events of greatest interest, and columns could be written; but these notes cannot be obtained in time for this article. An explosion. But to resume our story at Danville. As stated before, there were warehouses filled with provisions, stores, etc., for the army. The neighboring hills of Virginia and North Carolina and the valley of the River Dan were well populated. The news of the fall of Richmond, the surrender of Lee, and t
Frederick Junction (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
M. Cooke, wounded; died since the war. Privates. Ayres, T. J., wounded; died since the war. Anderson, Meredith, killed at Kernstown. Austin, M. G., wounded at Gettysburg, and died. Booker, Charles W., died since the war. Baughan, W. L., died since the war. Baughan, William, died in 1862. Baughan, David, killed at Gettysburg. Baughan, Robert, mortally wounded at Petersburg. Cooke, S. W., wounded at Mine Run and died since the war. Coleman, W. D., killed at Monocacy, Md. Coleman, W. A., died at Staunton in 1862. Creasy, Edward, killed at the Wilderness in 1864. Cunningham, W. H., died in prison. Dowdy, John M., died in 1861. Dowdy, E. E., died in 1862. Dowdy, John D., died in prison. Dowdy, James, killed at Cedar Mountain. Dowdy, Wilson M., while in the hospital at Winchester, in 1862, hearing that his company was in a heavy engagement, seized a musket, and running at a double-quick, fainted, fell, and in two days a little mound w
Fishers Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
nly forty-eight were living. The following is a list of those who were killed or died since and during the war: Captain F. D. Irving, died since the war. Captain A. C. Page, died since the war. Lieutenant C. H. Anderson, killed at Fisher's Hill. Lieutenant E. E. England, killed at Petersburg. Sergeant-Major William Denny, died since the war. Sergeant M. J. Dunkum, died since the war; lost a leg at Brandy Station. Sergeant W. S. Anderson, died at Valley Mountain. Sergeant Bolden Brown, died in 1862. Sergeant D. M. Coleman, killed at Fisher's Hill. Corporal W. M. Cooke, wounded; died since the war. Privates. Ayres, T. J., wounded; died since the war. Anderson, Meredith, killed at Kernstown. Austin, M. G., wounded at Gettysburg, and died. Booker, Charles W., died since the war. Baughan, W. L., died since the war. Baughan, William, died in 1862. Baughan, David, killed at Gettysburg. Baughan, Robert, mortally wounded at Petersbu
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
gregated in crowds around the warehouses. There was a rear guard of two companies left to protect the property; they tried to stop the rising storm. The crowd only waited for a leader. Soon one was found in a tall woman, who, with the cry, Our children and we'uns are starving; the Confederacy is gone up; let us help ourselves, started in, followed by hundreds. Aided by the stragglers, the unresisting guards were soon swept out of the way and the work of plundering began. A major from Lynchburg attempted to stop it, but he was soon glad to be able to retreat. Soon wagons, carts, wheelbarrows and every other conceivable means of removing the coveted supplies were pressed into service; women and children staggered under loads impossible under other circumstances for them to carry. But this scene was speedily put to an end in an unexpected and fatal manner. Near two of the largest warehouses the Confederate Ordnance Department had stored a large amount of loaded shells and a larg
Valley Mountain (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
o were enlisted only forty-eight were living. The following is a list of those who were killed or died since and during the war: Captain F. D. Irving, died since the war. Captain A. C. Page, died since the war. Lieutenant C. H. Anderson, killed at Fisher's Hill. Lieutenant E. E. England, killed at Petersburg. Sergeant-Major William Denny, died since the war. Sergeant M. J. Dunkum, died since the war; lost a leg at Brandy Station. Sergeant W. S. Anderson, died at Valley Mountain. Sergeant Bolden Brown, died in 1862. Sergeant D. M. Coleman, killed at Fisher's Hill. Corporal W. M. Cooke, wounded; died since the war. Privates. Ayres, T. J., wounded; died since the war. Anderson, Meredith, killed at Kernstown. Austin, M. G., wounded at Gettysburg, and died. Booker, Charles W., died since the war. Baughan, W. L., died since the war. Baughan, William, died in 1862. Baughan, David, killed at Gettysburg. Baughan, Robert, mortally wou
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
eceding it. How the news was received in Danville—Some of the closing scenes of the Confederacyon received the following: Hold all trains in Danville; send nothing out. Having heard nothing of. There were large government storehouses in Danville, all filled to the ceiling, as well as many lnds of rations in the storehouses and cars in Danville, soon to be raided and plundered by a mob. Sohe dawn of day brought other trouble to us in Danville, and we gave very little thought to the Green stragglers from the army had already reached Danville; in fact, they had been coming daily since thrty minutes not a straggler could be found in Danville. Many had dropped their plunder in the hurri The first we met was a well known citizen of Danville. In his arms he bore the mangled remains of burned. We maintained train service between Danville and this point for several days after the surcrossing the river on a pontoon, en route for Danville, and to operate against Johnston's army. The[12 more...]
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
union it was seen that of the 103 officers and men who were enlisted only forty-eight were living. The following is a list of those who were killed or died since and during the war: Captain F. D. Irving, died since the war. Captain A. C. Page, died since the war. Lieutenant C. H. Anderson, killed at Fisher's Hill. Lieutenant E. E. England, killed at Petersburg. Sergeant-Major William Denny, died since the war. Sergeant M. J. Dunkum, died since the war; lost a leg at Brandy Station. Sergeant W. S. Anderson, died at Valley Mountain. Sergeant Bolden Brown, died in 1862. Sergeant D. M. Coleman, killed at Fisher's Hill. Corporal W. M. Cooke, wounded; died since the war. Privates. Ayres, T. J., wounded; died since the war. Anderson, Meredith, killed at Kernstown. Austin, M. G., wounded at Gettysburg, and died. Booker, Charles W., died since the war. Baughan, W. L., died since the war. Baughan, William, died in 1862. Baughan, David, ki
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
D., died in prison. Dowdy, James, killed at Cedar Mountain. Dowdy, Wilson M., while in the hospital at Winchester, in 1862, hearing that his company was in a heavy engagement, seized a musket, and running at a double-quick, fainted, fell, and in two days a little mound was raised to mark the spot where this gallant soldier sleeps. Dunford, John F., killed at Gettysburg. Edwards, Thomas, died in hospital. Flippen, Charles, killed at Kernstown. Flippen, J. T., wounded at Chancellorsville, and died since the war. Flippen, Allen, died in 1862. Flippen, William, died in 1861. Godsey, Daniel L., died since the war. Garnett, Robert K., killed at Gettysburg. Garnett, James S., lost a leg; since died. Hendrick, Merritt S., died in 1861. Hatcher, Joseph, died in 1862. Harris, Joseph N., died since the war. Jones, Levi, died since the war. King, George H., was the last man killed at Gettysburg in his company, a few yards from the enemy's line. Me
Piedmont, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
ck some of the closing scenes of the Southern Confederacy, in which the writer participated, and which were several years since written out, and are here retold at the request of the Banner. The scene I will describe pertains to the evacuation of Richmond and the fifteen days immediately following. The writer was at the time trainmaster of the Richmond and Danville Railroad, and stationed at Danville, Va., the road then running only from Richmond to Danville, there connecting with the Piedmont road to Greensboro, N. C. How this railroad line, then the mainstay of the Southern Confederacy, the only line of communication between its capital and the Southern States, has grown and extended its lines; how the old Richmond and Danville went down, as the Confederation of States it supported, and how, from that wreck, has arisen the now well-known Southern Railway, permeating every Southern State! Can the growth of that system in any way be attributed to the rapid growth and improvement
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...