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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
vice computed at 600,000 men. Of these, North Carolina organized and furnished the Confederacy more of justice to the private soldiers whom North Carolina, under a sense of the appalling conflict a these trials of strength, the soldiers of North Carolina clove their way with sword and bayonet, wive a variety and coloring here and there. North Carolina, from earliest days of its tutelage, had bwar of the Colonies against Great Britain, North Carolina behaved with much reserve. She positivelyher than tell an untruth. The people of North Carolina, while liable, like others, to bursts of v His Word. Their good limbs were grown in North Carolina. Cromwell, writing after one of the revth the enemy, than was the 1st regiment of North Carolina in its baptism of blood at Bethel. You hawill be accorded to the private soldier of North Carolina a full share of every enduring virtue, gr was equalled and equalled again by ragged North Carolina privates. The zeal which impelled the m[3 more...]
France (France) (search for this): chapter 1.36
s in council which the government of Great Britain denounced against the other colonies. In this particular North Carolina in sentiment shared the attitude of New York more nearly than any other colony. Unaffectedly modest, the State has lost beyond reparation in divers ways. She has but recently awakened under the importunities of her patriotic women to her combined duty and advantage of monuments to her uncounted dead. The French are perhaps the most civilized people in Europe. In France no unselfish and meritorious act of public service, whether done by artisan or caste, fails to command expressive recognition in brass or stone or canvass. There is an unpretending shaft in one of the northwestern States erected to the memory of a school-boy, who at the early age of twelve, died under the lash rather than tell an untruth. The people of North Carolina, while liable, like others, to bursts of vehement impatience, in their normal mood delight to see justice clothed in ord
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
rty. There are many elevations between the level of the plain and the height of Parnassus. From the outbreak of the war between the Government and the Confederate States until Palm Sunday, in 1865, when the unpowerful regiments of the Army of Northern Virginia lowered their banners and dispersed to find ruined homes and a country girded with sackcloth and sprinkled with ashes, the United States employed 1,700 regiments of infantry, 270 regiments of cavalry and 900 batteries of artillery, an estimated total in excess of 2,600,000 men. Against this force the Confederacy opposed a total of all arms of the service computed at 600,000 men. Of these, Noafter acting well their parts, to submit to the will of God. When the Governor of Mississippi was arrested in the executive office, on a warrant issued by a United States Commissioner, who held his appointment at the hands of a Federal Judge—the Revolution was complete. Charles Dickens in one of those pathetic creations in th
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 1.36
They were a pure bred people. Local influences gave a variety and coloring here and there. North Carolina, from earliest days of its tutelage, had been conservative. In the period immediately preceding the war of the Colonies against Great Britain, North Carolina behaved with much reserve. She positively refused for a time to adopt the Articles of Confederation, and Botta, who has written the most instructive history of the war of Independence, says: She was often excepted from the orders in council which the government of Great Britain denounced against the other colonies. In this particular North Carolina in sentiment shared the attitude of New York more nearly than any other colony. Unaffectedly modest, the State has lost beyond reparation in divers ways. She has but recently awakened under the importunities of her patriotic women to her combined duty and advantage of monuments to her uncounted dead. The French are perhaps the most civilized people in Europe. In
Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
The private soldier of the C. S. Army, and as Exemplified by the Representation from North Carolina. An address by Hon. R. T. Bennett, late Colonel 14th North Carolina Infantry, C. S. A. before the Ladies' Memorial Association at Raleigh, N. C., May 10, 1897. Madam President, Ladies of the Memorial Association, My Countrymen . Every people has its heroes—of these heroes some are enshrined as champions of human liberty. There are many elevations between the level of the plain and the height of Parnassus. From the outbreak of the war between the Government and the Confederate States until Palm Sunday, in 1865, when the unpowerful regiments of the Army of Northern Virginia lowered their banners and dispersed to find ruined homes and a country girded with sackcloth and sprinkled with ashes, the United States employed 1,700 regiments of infantry, 270 regiments of cavalry and 900 batteries of artillery, an estimated total in excess of 2,600,000 men. Against this for
s their chiefest vocation. It sustained a most unusually large proportion to all other engagements of the population. They were a pure bred people. Local influences gave a variety and coloring here and there. North Carolina, from earliest days of its tutelage, had been conservative. In the period immediately preceding the war of the Colonies against Great Britain, North Carolina behaved with much reserve. She positively refused for a time to adopt the Articles of Confederation, and Botta, who has written the most instructive history of the war of Independence, says: She was often excepted from the orders in council which the government of Great Britain denounced against the other colonies. In this particular North Carolina in sentiment shared the attitude of New York more nearly than any other colony. Unaffectedly modest, the State has lost beyond reparation in divers ways. She has but recently awakened under the importunities of her patriotic women to her combined duty
rendered them among the toughest soldiers who ever did battle in any cause. The men proved obedient to discipline and orders. Company and regimental government was more due to the personal influence and example of the officers and non-commissioned officers, to the reciprocal esteem of private soldiers and their immediate superiors in rank for each other than to The Article of War and to the army regulations. The greater the fool the better the soldier has been ascribed to the Duke of Wellington. It is a perverse saying contradicted by the experience of our war. I heard a venerable man caution a youth, who was given to indiscretions, against the first wrong steps in life. The after weight of such false start. Never were soldiers more helped by fortune in their first hostile meeting with the enemy, than was the 1st regiment of North Carolina in its baptism of blood at Bethel. You have commemorated in deep letters cut away down into the stone body of the monument, which st
W. P. Alexander (search for this): chapter 1.36
ey were self-restrained—obedient to those in authority, not given to complaining, not exacting of those who were set over them. They fought well, meanwhile they were perfected in all the requirements of the service. They attained precision of movement, rapidity in covering ground, capacity to endure fatigue and an excellence in sustaining long marches which was the admiration of the army. The greatest accomplishment in soldiers next to courage, is a high power of locomotion. When Alexander the Great complained of his illustrious master for having exposed philosophy to the knowledge of the vulgar, he uttered a sentiment common to antiquity, and in complete unison with the spirit of his age. The murmuring multitude have during a hundred years invaded the domain of exclusive rights. Exclusion is doomed. The people have conquered. Education which in its complete analysis is the knowledge of the world's past, its storied past, the achievements and resources of its civilizat
ctuated by 2,265 conflicts, counting great and small of every sort, including 625 considerable fights, and 330 battles. Into these trials of strength, the soldiers of North Carolina clove their way with sword and bayonet, with gun and cannon, and came off with good report. The people of those Southern States which were completely identified with the Confederacy during the late war, possessed many characteristics in common—descended as they were from ancestors who sprang from the Anglo-Saxon nurseries, they inherited the same laws, the same literature, the same traditions of civil and political liberty and a like inborn sense of religion. Their pursuits bore a striking similitude the South over—agriculture was their chiefest vocation. It sustained a most unusually large proportion to all other engagements of the population. They were a pure bred people. Local influences gave a variety and coloring here and there. North Carolina, from earliest days of its tutelage, had bee
Charles Dickens (search for this): chapter 1.36
State, understood well what was involved in the issue. Upon this issue and upon the unseen foundation beneath it, the war was fought. We lost. Philosophers do not repine over the inevitable. They are content after acting well their parts, to submit to the will of God. When the Governor of Mississippi was arrested in the executive office, on a warrant issued by a United States Commissioner, who held his appointment at the hands of a Federal Judge—the Revolution was complete. Charles Dickens in one of those pathetic creations in the domain of romance, the delight of his contemporaries and the admiration of this age, represents the early Christians as escaping from their persecutors into the Catacombs of Rome. Their hiding place having been discovered, the cruel soldiery murder the fathers and mothers in the presence of their children, who in the transports of feeling, rush towards the murderers, crying aloud: We are Christians. Those of us who in our very hearts beli
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