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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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R. T. Bennett (search for this): chapter 1.36
The private soldier of the C. S. Army, and as Exemplified by the Representation from North Carolina. An address by Hon. R. T. Bennett, late Colonel 14th North Carolina Infantry, C. S. A. before the Ladies' Memorial Association at Raleigh, N. C., May 10, 1897. Madam President, Ladies of the Memorial Association, My Countrymen . Every people has its heroes—of these heroes some are enshrined as champions of human liberty. There are many elevations between the level of the plain and the height of Parnassus. From the outbreak of the war between the Government and the Confederate States until Palm Sunday, in 1865, when the unpowerful regiments of the Army of Northern Virginia lowered their banners and dispersed to find ruined homes and a country girded with sackcloth and sprinkled with ashes, the United States employed 1,700 regiments of infantry, 270 regiments of cavalry and 900 batteries of artillery, an estimated total in excess of 2,600,000 men. Against this for
n arms to whom disaster might prove more irreparable. The private soldiers were conscious of all this while it was passing. Never did the rank and file of an army hold a heavier share in the anxieties, the fearful looking for of their commanders. There are occasions in the experience of regiments, brigades and armies, when they rise superior to themselves, when the enemy, astounded by their audacity, stand at attention and applaud the on-coming host. In that epic campaign, Gideon, Sampson, Barak and David were outdone. Once in the supreme crisis of a great battle, when the earth trembled like a heated oven, and the battalion hesitated, a private soldier of well earned renown, appealed to them to go forward and strike home for their cause. Persisting in his appeal, he said: They that love God go forward. Every human virtue was repeated during that struggle. The glimpse mercifully given us of the Chevalier Bayard constituting the rear guard of his army, done to death
Oliver Cromwell (search for this): chapter 1.36
er, culminating in the most careful scrutiny into individual character and genealogy. The youth, manhood and age, who, in 1861, in a steady column of march, presented themselves representatives of every house, household and altar in our State, were born in these surroundings, amidst these traditions. They were brought up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. They had a well grounded faith in our precious Creator and in His Word. Their good limbs were grown in North Carolina. Cromwell, writing after one of the reverses which befell the arms of the Parliament early in the struggle with the King, said: We need men of religion to fight with men of honor. Receiving at the hands of the proper officials their company and regimental assignments, these men selected by their free votes their captains, lieutenants and ensigns; these were their neighbors and equals at home. Capable men, worthy of the trust and confidence of the companies, and these company officers in turn chos
The private soldier of the C. S. Army, and as Exemplified by the Representation from North Carolina. An address by Hon. R. T. Bennett, late Colonel 14th North Carolina Infantry, C. S. A. before the Ladies' Memorial Association at Raleigh, N. C., May 10, 1897. Madam President, Ladies of the Memorial Association, My Countrymen . Every people has its heroes—of these heroes some are enshrined as champions of human liberty. There are many elevations between the level of the plain and the height of Parnassus. From the outbreak of the war between the Government and the Confederate States until Palm Sunday, in 1865, when the unpowerful regiments of the Army of Northern Virginia lowered their banners and dispersed to find ruined homes and a country girded with sackcloth and sprinkled with ashes, the United States employed 1,700 regiments of infantry, 270 regiments of cavalry and 900 batteries of artillery, an estimated total in excess of 2,600,000 men. Against this fo
ses which drive our race to explore now its origin, then the advances of our people from one stage of development to another, culminating in the most careful scrutiny into individual character and genealogy. The youth, manhood and age, who, in 1861, in a steady column of march, presented themselves representatives of every house, household and altar in our State, were born in these surroundings, amidst these traditions. They were brought up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. Theyecurity, personal liberty and private property. To the full and equal participation of the people of our State in all the rights and privileges which constitutions and statutes assure to the citizen is due in a measure the unanimous decision in 1861 to make common cause with the South, and the heroic determination with which that decision was upheld. When the true and faithful account of the war is written, there will be accorded to the private soldier of North Carolina a full share of ev
May, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1.36
nt of the war is written, there will be accorded to the private soldier of North Carolina a full share of every enduring virtue, great quality, persistent courage which has distinguished soldiers since history emerged from fable. The limitations imposed upon us by the proprieties of this occasion will not be overstepped if we say these soldiers rose to their highest and most honorable estate perhaps in the campaign which began in the tangled forest near the Rapidan in the early days of May, 1864. The sweet breath of the wind came up from the deserted chambers of the South. The soldiers by their experience and sound sense penetrated through all disguise, all strategy—they knew the supreme moment had come—that supreme moment with all its agony and strain, and blood was drawn out full three months. Never was the peril of an army more constant, never marched nor fought nor slept nor hungered nor prayed men in arms to whom disaster might prove more irreparable. The private soldiers
ett, late Colonel 14th North Carolina Infantry, C. S. A. before the Ladies' Memorial Association at Raleigh, N. C., May 10, 1897. Madam President, Ladies of the Memorial Association, My Countrymen . Every people has its heroes—of these heroes some are enshrined as champions of human liberty. There are many elevations between the level of the plain and the height of Parnassus. From the outbreak of the war between the Government and the Confederate States until Palm Sunday, in 1865, when the unpowerful regiments of the Army of Northern Virginia lowered their banners and dispersed to find ruined homes and a country girded with sackcloth and sprinkled with ashes, the United States employed 1,700 regiments of infantry, 270 regiments of cavalry and 900 batteries of artillery, an estimated total in excess of 2,600,000 men. Against this force the Confederacy opposed a total of all arms of the service computed at 600,000 men. Of these, North Carolina organized and furnishe
May 10th, 1897 AD (search for this): chapter 1.36
The private soldier of the C. S. Army, and as Exemplified by the Representation from North Carolina. An address by Hon. R. T. Bennett, late Colonel 14th North Carolina Infantry, C. S. A. before the Ladies' Memorial Association at Raleigh, N. C., May 10, 1897. Madam President, Ladies of the Memorial Association, My Countrymen . Every people has its heroes—of these heroes some are enshrined as champions of human liberty. There are many elevations between the level of the plain and the height of Parnassus. From the outbreak of the war between the Government and the Confederate States until Palm Sunday, in 1865, when the unpowerful regiments of the Army of Northern Virginia lowered their banners and dispersed to find ruined homes and a country girded with sackcloth and sprinkled with ashes, the United States employed 1,700 regiments of infantry, 270 regiments of cavalry and 900 batteries of artillery, an estimated total in excess of 2,600,000 men. Against this for
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