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January 1st (search for this): chapter 1.37
ide by side; for a very brief space, though. Next week he went up till he became head, while I remained tutisimus in medio for four blessed years. I was very sorry to lose Mac. from my side, especially during recitations, for he used to tell me things, and was a great help; besides he was such a little bred and born gentleman, only fifteen years and seven months, while I-God save the mark—was twenty. Old Jack as a student. Old Jack, as we called him, hung about the bottom, at the first January examination all below him were cut off, he was foot and probably would have been cut off also, but his teachers observed in him such a determined intention to succeed that they felt sure he would certainly improve—and he did. Our rooms were small, each with two single bedsteads (iron), a bare, cold floor, and an anthracite grate. Old Jack, a few minutes before taps, would pile his grate with coal, so as to have a bright, glowing fire when taps sounded and all other lights were out.
June, 1842 AD (search for this): chapter 1.37
to the world the deep tenderness of that wonderful character, a tenderness never before suspected by any human being to exist. In the life and letters of Stonewall Jackson, published by her, are revelations of affectionate gentleness unknown to any but to her. The world owes her untold gratitude for this work, so beautifully accomplished that it will be a classic as long as the English language shall be known. Jackson at West Point. I entered the Military Academy at West Point in June, 1842. A week afterwards a cadet sergeant passed, escorting a newly-arrived cadet to his quarters. The personal appearance of the stranger was so remarkable as to attract the attention of several of us, who were standing near and chatting together. Burkett Fry, A. P. Hill, and George Pickett, all Virginians, and destined to be distinguished generals, made our group. The new cadet was clad in gray homespun, a waggoner's hat, and large, heavy brogans; weather-stained saddlebags were over his
atch him with anxiety when his turn came to cut at the head or leap the bars. He had a rough hand with the bridle, an ungainly seat, and when he would cut at a head upon the ground, he seemed in imminent danger of falling headlong from his horse. One biographer tells us as proof of his skill that no horse ever threw him. This proof would not satisfy a fox-hunter or a cow-boy, or any other real horseman. He could no more have become a horseman than he could have danced the german. About 1850 Jackson was a lieutenant of artillery stationed at Governor's Island, when he was invited to accept the chair of Mathematics in the Virginia Military Institute. In those days the government would grant an officer leave of absence for one year to enable him to try such an office before resigning his commission. So he came up to West Point to see McClellan and myself and other comrades before retiring from the army. He was more cordial and affectionate than was usual with him, for he was
January 23rd, 1898 AD (search for this): chapter 1.37
General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson. [from the Richmond, Va., times, January 23, 1898.] Incidents in the remarkable career of the great soldier. by General Dabney H. Maury. He made a poor impression when he first arrived at West Point—a second in a Duel—he obeyed orders at great cost. Men will never cease to wonder at the character and history of General Thomas Jonathan Jackson. No other man in history can be likened to him. He has oftener been compared with Oliver Cromwell than with any other great soldier. But Cromwell was a great statesman, who ruled his people with far-reaching wisdom. We have no evidence that Jackson can be likened to Cromwell in this, but would be inclined to pronounce Jackson a warrior, pure and simple, devoid of any great strategic capacity, as he seemed to be of good fellowship, humorous inclinations or any degree of tenderness. Four years of incarceration together at West Point and subsequent service together in the armies of the United
Bernard Bee (search for this): chapter 1.37
Professor of Mathematics by remain as you are. Next year he went off to the great war between the States, and won fame at once. Rumors of a great victory came. His wife and friends were anxious for the news. It came by a courier, who spurred in hot haste to his home, in Lexington. These were the words: My subscription to the negro Sunday-school is due—it is fifty cents—which I send by the courier. Nothing more. At the First Manassas his fame was made, when that noble soldier, Bernard Bee, cried out to his wavering men, See where Jackson, with his Virginians, stands like a stone wall! Let us form behind them. After the repulse at Malvern Hill, General Lee and other generals were discussing the situation, and what we were to do in the morning. Jackson was lying upon the ground, apparently slumbering, his cap lying over his face. He was aroused and asked his opinion of what was to be done in the morning. Removing the cap from his face, he said: They won't be there in
Archie Botts (search for this): chapter 1.37
led him to study the lesson for the day, and very soon he began to rise in his class, and we all were glad of his success; for cold and undemonstrative as he was, he was absolutely honest and kindly, intensely attending to his own business, and as it was, he came to be near the head of our class, the largest that had ever graduated there. We had altogether 164 members—counting those turned back into it; we graduated sixty after four weary, profitless years (to me). Then Cadmus Wilcox, Archie Botts, Dominie Wilson and Old Jack, as we now called Jackson of Virginia, traveled on together to their Virginia homes, and arriving in Washington, took a room in Brown's Hotel. All four were in one room, and it was blazing hot, for they were right under the roof. Cadmus, on reaching the capital of the nation, was invited to spend the evening with the Secretary of War, and did not return to his room until about 1 o'clock A. M. He paused; the door was locked, and the sounds of boisterous revel
Jesse Brown (search for this): chapter 1.37
ounds of boisterous revelry were roaring within. For some time he demanded entrance in vain, and when at last admitted found High Jinks were enacting there. Poor Archie, in his fine new uniform, lay slumbering upon a bed, while Dominie and Old Jack, with only one garment, were singing with stunning effect Benny Hahn's Oh, and executing a barefooted back-step in time to the music. Each composed his own poetry, in tones which resounded through the house and over the Avenue, till old Mr. Jesse Brown sent his compliments, with a request that they would stop that noise. This was Old Jack's first and last frolic, to which in years long after his fame had filled the world he dimly alluded, when he said he was too fond of liquor to trust himself to drink it. As for poor Dominie, his long pent craving was never slaked any more until his enfeebled frame was laid to rest in a soldier's grave, away off in the shadow of the Rockies. Second in a duel. From the moment that Jackson en
now? They will demand another shot. We will grant it with pistols at ten paces, said Fry, and as he said, the second of the Captain came forward and demanded another shot. We agree, said Jackson, and we will fight with pistols at ten paces. The Captain declined the terms, the men were never reconciled. The Captain died many years after, regretting that he had not killed Lee. Jackson was a strict constructionist of all orders and of all points of duty. Obeyed the order. When John Brown made his attempt to arouse insurrection in Virginia, Governor Wise called out the troops, of the State, and ordered the Corps of Cadets to be held ready for immediate service. General Smith, superintendent of the corps, promptly obeyed the orders. Major Jackson reported at the guard-room ready for the field. General Smith, after giving attention to some matters requiring it, said: Major Jackson, you will remain as you are till further orders. At that moment Major Jackson was seated upo
ear the head of our class, the largest that had ever graduated there. We had altogether 164 members—counting those turned back into it; we graduated sixty after four weary, profitless years (to me). Then Cadmus Wilcox, Archie Botts, Dominie Wilson and Old Jack, as we now called Jackson of Virginia, traveled on together to their Virginia homes, and arriving in Washington, took a room in Brown's Hotel. All four were in one room, and it was blazing hot, for they were right under the roof. Cadmus, on reaching the capital of the nation, was invited to spend the evening with the Secretary of War, and did not return to his room until about 1 o'clock A. M. He paused; the door was locked, and the sounds of boisterous revelry were roaring within. For some time he demanded entrance in vain, and when at last admitted found High Jinks were enacting there. Poor Archie, in his fine new uniform, lay slumbering upon a bed, while Dominie and Old Jack, with only one garment, were singing with
Oliver Cromwell (search for this): chapter 1.37
e to wonder at the character and history of General Thomas Jonathan Jackson. No other man in history can be likened to him. He has oftener been compared with Oliver Cromwell than with any other great soldier. But Cromwell was a great statesman, who ruled his people with far-reaching wisdom. We have no evidence that Jackson can bCromwell was a great statesman, who ruled his people with far-reaching wisdom. We have no evidence that Jackson can be likened to Cromwell in this, but would be inclined to pronounce Jackson a warrior, pure and simple, devoid of any great strategic capacity, as he seemed to be of good fellowship, humorous inclinations or any degree of tenderness. Four years of incarceration together at West Point and subsequent service together in the armies Cromwell in this, but would be inclined to pronounce Jackson a warrior, pure and simple, devoid of any great strategic capacity, as he seemed to be of good fellowship, humorous inclinations or any degree of tenderness. Four years of incarceration together at West Point and subsequent service together in the armies of the United States and Confederate States gave me as good opportunities of estimating the mind and the nature of Stonewall Jackson as any man has ever enjoyed. I believe Jackson was as fond of me as he ever was of any man of our times. It was for his wife to waken and nurture, and since his death to disclose to the world the d
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