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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Thomas Jonathan Jackson (search for this): chapter 1.37
General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson. [from the Richmond, Va., times, January 23, 1898.] Incidents in the remarkable career of the great soldier. by General Dabney H. Maury. He made a poor impression when he first arrived at West Point—a sea Duel—he obeyed orders at great cost. Men will never cease to wonder at the character and history of General Thomas Jonathan Jackson. No other man in history can be likened to him. He has oftener been compared with Oliver Cromwell than witht soldier. But Cromwell was a great statesman, who ruled his people with far-reaching wisdom. We have no evidence that Jackson can be likened to Cromwell in this, but would be inclined to pronounce Jackson a warrior, pure and simple, devoid of anyJackson a warrior, pure and simple, devoid of any great strategic capacity, as he seemed to be of good fellowship, humorous inclinations or any degree of tenderness. Four years of incarceration together at West Point and subsequent service together in the armies of the United States and Confede
Bernard Bee (search for this): chapter 1.37
Professor of Mathematics by remain as you are. Next year he went off to the great war between the States, and won fame at once. Rumors of a great victory came. His wife and friends were anxious for the news. It came by a courier, who spurred in hot haste to his home, in Lexington. These were the words: My subscription to the negro Sunday-school is due—it is fifty cents—which I send by the courier. Nothing more. At the First Manassas his fame was made, when that noble soldier, Bernard Bee, cried out to his wavering men, See where Jackson, with his Virginians, stands like a stone wall! Let us form behind them. After the repulse at Malvern Hill, General Lee and other generals were discussing the situation, and what we were to do in the morning. Jackson was lying upon the ground, apparently slumbering, his cap lying over his face. He was aroused and asked his opinion of what was to be done in the morning. Removing the cap from his face, he said: They won't be there in
Jesse Brown (search for this): chapter 1.37
ounds of boisterous revelry were roaring within. For some time he demanded entrance in vain, and when at last admitted found High Jinks were enacting there. Poor Archie, in his fine new uniform, lay slumbering upon a bed, while Dominie and Old Jack, with only one garment, were singing with stunning effect Benny Hahn's Oh, and executing a barefooted back-step in time to the music. Each composed his own poetry, in tones which resounded through the house and over the Avenue, till old Mr. Jesse Brown sent his compliments, with a request that they would stop that noise. This was Old Jack's first and last frolic, to which in years long after his fame had filled the world he dimly alluded, when he said he was too fond of liquor to trust himself to drink it. As for poor Dominie, his long pent craving was never slaked any more until his enfeebled frame was laid to rest in a soldier's grave, away off in the shadow of the Rockies. Second in a duel. From the moment that Jackson en
William N. Wilson (search for this): chapter 1.37
e lesson for the day, and very soon he began to rise in his class, and we all were glad of his success; for cold and undemonstrative as he was, he was absolutely honest and kindly, intensely attending to his own business, and as it was, he came to be near the head of our class, the largest that had ever graduated there. We had altogether 164 members—counting those turned back into it; we graduated sixty after four weary, profitless years (to me). Then Cadmus Wilcox, Archie Botts, Dominie Wilson and Old Jack, as we now called Jackson of Virginia, traveled on together to their Virginia homes, and arriving in Washington, took a room in Brown's Hotel. All four were in one room, and it was blazing hot, for they were right under the roof. Cadmus, on reaching the capital of the nation, was invited to spend the evening with the Secretary of War, and did not return to his room until about 1 o'clock A. M. He paused; the door was locked, and the sounds of boisterous revelry were roaring wit
Barton Haxall Wise (search for this): chapter 1.37
ls at ten paces, said Fry, and as he said, the second of the Captain came forward and demanded another shot. We agree, said Jackson, and we will fight with pistols at ten paces. The Captain declined the terms, the men were never reconciled. The Captain died many years after, regretting that he had not killed Lee. Jackson was a strict constructionist of all orders and of all points of duty. Obeyed the order. When John Brown made his attempt to arouse insurrection in Virginia, Governor Wise called out the troops, of the State, and ordered the Corps of Cadets to be held ready for immediate service. General Smith, superintendent of the corps, promptly obeyed the orders. Major Jackson reported at the guard-room ready for the field. General Smith, after giving attention to some matters requiring it, said: Major Jackson, you will remain as you are till further orders. At that moment Major Jackson was seated upon a campstool in the guard-room with his sabre across his knees.
William C. Shields (search for this): chapter 1.37
her? asked the officer. Oh, she said, No man's lips shall ever again drink from that pitcher. Blessed the child. Again, while marching on to some new victory, he halted by a farm-house, whence a young mother came out into the road, with her young child in her arms, and said: General, won't you bless my child? He took the little infant in his arms, and reverently raising it, with uncovered head, prayed for God's blessing upon it. In the battle of Kernstown he was worsted by General Shields (one of the noblest of the Federal commanders). Because of the Confederates' ammunition being all exhausted, General Dick Garnett withdrew his troops. Jackson arrested Garnett, one of the truest and highest gentlemen in our army, and held him in arrest until Garnett, by personal influence, procured a trial by court-martial. Jackson was the principal witness for the prosecution. The court acquitted Garnett, after hearing Jackson's testimony, and only permitted the defence to be spread
ia homes, and arriving in Washington, took a room in Brown's Hotel. All four were in one room, and it was blazing hot, for they were right under the roof. Cadmus, on reaching the capital of the nation, was invited to spend the evening with the Secretary of War, and did not return to his room until about 1 o'clock A. M. He paused; the door was locked, and the sounds of boisterous revelry were roaring within. For some time he demanded entrance in vain, and when at last admitted found High Jinks were enacting there. Poor Archie, in his fine new uniform, lay slumbering upon a bed, while Dominie and Old Jack, with only one garment, were singing with stunning effect Benny Hahn's Oh, and executing a barefooted back-step in time to the music. Each composed his own poetry, in tones which resounded through the house and over the Avenue, till old Mr. Jesse Brown sent his compliments, with a request that they would stop that noise. This was Old Jack's first and last frolic, to which in y
now? They will demand another shot. We will grant it with pistols at ten paces, said Fry, and as he said, the second of the Captain came forward and demanded another shot. We agree, said Jackson, and we will fight with pistols at ten paces. The Captain declined the terms, the men were never reconciled. The Captain died many years after, regretting that he had not killed Lee. Jackson was a strict constructionist of all orders and of all points of duty. Obeyed the order. When John Brown made his attempt to arouse insurrection in Virginia, Governor Wise called out the troops, of the State, and ordered the Corps of Cadets to be held ready for immediate service. General Smith, superintendent of the corps, promptly obeyed the orders. Major Jackson reported at the guard-room ready for the field. General Smith, after giving attention to some matters requiring it, said: Major Jackson, you will remain as you are till further orders. At that moment Major Jackson was seated upo
Robert D. Johnston (search for this): chapter 1.37
Peculiar malady. He informed us, however, of a peculiar malady which troubled him, and complained that one arm and one leg were heavier than the other, and would occasionally raise his arm straight up, as he said, to let the blood run back into his body, and so relieve the excessive weight. I have heard that he often did this, when marching, and having become very religious, his men supposed he was praying. I never saw him any more, except at Manassas after the battle, when General Johnston and other officers were congratulating him upon his fine conduct in the battle. These peculiarities have often been regarded and cited as evidences of the great genius he possessed. I have always heard it said that he was an advocate for raising the black flag, and showing no mercy to the enemy who were invading our country and destroying our homes. And it has often been said and written, that he urged General Lee to assault the enemy in the town of Fredericksburg by night, after t
G. B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 1.37
e was ended, and we were emancipated from the military prison of West Point, for we all liked and respected him. After our encampment of two months was over we went into barracks and were arranged in sections alphabetically, and thus it was McClellan and I sat side by side; for a very brief space, though. Next week he went up till he became head, while I remained tutisimus in medio for four blessed years. I was very sorry to lose Mac. from my side, especially during recitations, for he usr of Mathematics in the Virginia Military Institute. In those days the government would grant an officer leave of absence for one year to enable him to try such an office before resigning his commission. So he came up to West Point to see McClellan and myself and other comrades before retiring from the army. He was more cordial and affectionate than was usual with him, for he was never demonstrative in his manners, and he was in good spirits, because of his promotion and the compliment p
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