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command moved back to Courtland. Big Nance creek being very high, the drivers swam their horses across at the ford and the cannoneers passed the pieces over the railroad bridge by hand. We remained in the streets of Courtland during the night. It seems that Colonel Streight left the main command while we were engaged in the artillery duel the day before, and General Forrest had caught on to it, for we left Courtland early the next morning, and went up the mountain leaving a portion of General Roddy's command under Major Moreland in the valley. Here we first heard of the raiding party under Colonel Streight and got on his track. I remember General Forrest telling us that they, the Yankees, were taking the rings off the gals fingers, and that we would take them back when we caught them, after a rest of about an hour, the command moved forward at a lively gait as the trail was a warm one. We continued the pursuit in a southeasterly direction. We found that the Yankees had taken or
Emma Sansone (search for this): chapter 1.4
An Alabama Heroine. Miss Emma Sansone, who piloted General Forrest across Black Creek, in his famous pursuit and capture of Col. A. D. Streight. With an account of the surrender by Gen. D. H. Maury. The eloquent address of General Dabney H. Maury—The Wizard of the West—lingers a delight in the minds of those who fortunately heard it. His vivid portrayal of the characteristics and stirring recital of the remarkable achievements of Lieutenant-General Nathan Bedford Forrest, has re-incited deep interest in the phenomenal leader. Any illustration of his brilliant career, even unpretentious, may be deemed acceptable to the public. The narrative of a follower of the great soldier, which is presented, was sent the Editor by Mr. W. L. Fleming, a librarian of the A. & M. College, Auburn, Ala. In the early part of April, 1863, the commander of the Federal forces in Tennessee determined to send a strong raiding party around the Confederate forces under Gen. Bragg for the purp
Emma Sansom (search for this): chapter 1.4
not know which were Forrest's men nor which the Yankees, and cared less. But we had got over the mountains and were now in a more level country. I found the old cow ford a very rough one, and on riding over my horse bogged in the quicksand, so I had the horses unhitched and taken over, and by hitching to the prolonge rope and the men in the water at the wheels, I got over and up the very steep little hill on the east side. I learned that the young lady who piloted us to the ford was Miss Emma Sansom, and for her services on this occasion the General Assembly of Alabama at the session of 1864, by joint resolution, directed the Governor of the State to issue a patent to her of 160 acres of land, and also to have prepared, with a suitable inscription thereon, a gold medal, and present the same in the name of the State of Alabama to her. See Acts of 1864. After crossing Black creek we passed on near by the town of Gadsden, and a few miles east of that place we had a few rounds with
Frank Watkins (search for this): chapter 1.4
t the horse promised me by General Forrest, and having great confidence in Captain Ferrell's judgment of horse flesh, I asked him to take one of the men with him and pick out one for me. He did so, and sent me a beautiful dapple gray horse which the prisoners informed us had belonged to Colonel Hathaway, who was killed on him in the engagement near Gadsden. I was very proud of my horse for he was indeed a beautiful animal. In Rome I met several persons that I knew, among them was Captain Frank Watkins, now of Opelika, who contributed something to my scant wardrobe. And old Nell, Captain Ferrell's servant, did some washing for me while I slept. I went to the old store house in Rome where the saddles and bridles belonging to Streight's command had been deposited, to pick me a saddle and bridle, and I never have seen so many saddles and bridles in one pile before or since. The house was literally full of them. Here our battery was made horse artillery, cannoneers being mounted
ived some reinforcements of cavalry, and with Ferrell's Battery and a section of Freman's Battery. which it seems was the camp of the raiders. Ferrell's Battery and a part of the command was sent s, and I saw lying on the ground, asleep, Captain Ferrell, and a few feet farther lay General Forree rein, lay down with my back as close to Captain Ferrell as I could get. It seemed that I had hard aroused by the voice of General Forrest, Captain Ferrell, move your battery forward, and forward w hands and of which I did not get one, as Captain Ferrell suggested that I had been given a piece o on and help guard the prisoners, and for Captain Ferrell to come on leisurely with his heavier gun turkey; anyhow, we ate with a relish. Captain Ferrell camped in another part of the town with hl Forrest, and having great confidence in Captain Ferrell's judgment of horse flesh, I asked him tohing to my scant wardrobe. And old Nell, Captain Ferrell's servant, did some washing for me while [2 more...]
W. L. Fleming (search for this): chapter 1.4
ury—The Wizard of the West—lingers a delight in the minds of those who fortunately heard it. His vivid portrayal of the characteristics and stirring recital of the remarkable achievements of Lieutenant-General Nathan Bedford Forrest, has re-incited deep interest in the phenomenal leader. Any illustration of his brilliant career, even unpretentious, may be deemed acceptable to the public. The narrative of a follower of the great soldier, which is presented, was sent the Editor by Mr. W. L. Fleming, a librarian of the A. & M. College, Auburn, Ala. In the early part of April, 1863, the commander of the Federal forces in Tennessee determined to send a strong raiding party around the Confederate forces under Gen. Bragg for the purpose of destroying the railroads and cutting off supplies and reinforcements, and also to destroy the extensive Confederate works then at Rome, Ga. For this daring purpose Col. Abel D. Streight, of Indiana, was selected, and he was given command of 2,
Clay Ramsey (search for this): chapter 1.4
ant space in front of the mansion of a Mr. Spurlock. There we parked our guns, took out the horses, and—all lay down on the ground to rest. I don't think I had slept long when I was aroused by Mr. Spurlock—think that was his name—who insisted that we should go over to his residence and take dinner. We thanked him, and insisted that we had had something to eat, but he would not take such an excuse. The truth is we were too dirty and ragged to feel at home in such a nice place. Finally Clay Ramsey consented to go with me, and we went over. The old gentleman enquired our names and introduced us to his daughters, very beautiful young ladies, who entertained us by singing and playing on the piano until dinner was announced. Then we escorted the young ladies down to the dining-room, and such a dinner we had not seen before in years. We tried to do our duty towards that dinner, and particularly to the turkey; anyhow, we ate with a relish. Captain Ferrell camped in another part of <
d. Big Nance creek being very high, the drivers swam their horses across at the ford and the cannoneers passed the pieces over the railroad bridge by hand. We remained in the streets of Courtland during the night. It seems that Colonel Streight left the main command while we were engaged in the artillery duel the day before, and General Forrest had caught on to it, for we left Courtland early the next morning, and went up the mountain leaving a portion of General Roddy's command under Major Moreland in the valley. Here we first heard of the raiding party under Colonel Streight and got on his track. I remember General Forrest telling us that they, the Yankees, were taking the rings off the gals fingers, and that we would take them back when we caught them, after a rest of about an hour, the command moved forward at a lively gait as the trail was a warm one. We continued the pursuit in a southeasterly direction. We found that the Yankees had taken or destroyed everything in the wa
and about thirty or forty yards short. I never saw him again. The dust and the smoke seemed to envelop him. The aim had been perfect, and a shout went up from our lines at this shot on the wing. After the Yankees had been run off, the cavalrymen procured a batteau from the opposite side of the river and went over and got all their horses and equipments and provisions, among which was a nice lot of hams, of which Colonel Biffle sent me a liberal share. After leaving Savannah (where poor Coon Herndon of Ferrell's battery had been mortally wounded on a former occasion) we went down the river on a still hunt for gunboats. We did not find any boats, but we did come across a nice party of Yankees on the opposite side of the river engaged in eating, bathing and playing cards. We came up behind a high lot fence, and peeping one of my little howitzers around the corner of the fence I opened on them with shell which exploded in their midst, they were taken completely by surprise and sta
t. The combined commands of the Federals landed and crossed the Tennessee river below Tuscumbia, in the extreme northwestern part of the State of Alabama. They made their way up the valley, driving back the small cavalry force of the Confederates which was in their front; the Confederates then being scattered over the whole north line of Alabama. When Town creek was reached Forrest made a stand, having received some reinforcements of cavalry, and with Ferrell's Battery and a section of Freman's Battery. The command was posted on the east side of Town creek, between the ford and railroad bridge. Here an artillery duel was kept up with the Federal host on the west side, which lasted nearly a whole day. During the day it seemed that the Yankees were trying to cross the creek at the ford, the creek being considerably swollen from recent rains. Gen. Forrest ordered the writer to take one of the guns of Ferrell's Battery and go down and drive the enemy from the ford. I took a twelv
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