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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.42
red, and we accepted it. To arms, to arms, was echoed throughout the land. The bugle-call was heard from every hilltop, and throughout every valley. Fathers, husbands, sons, brothers, and sweethearts, gave the farewell kiss, and pressed forward to repel the foe, that as we honestly believe, was invading our territory. From every State came the sons of the South. From the plains of Texas, from the States washed by the Gulf, from across the Father of Waters, from Tennessee, Kentucky, and Maryland, from the Carolinas and Florida, from every State of the Southland they came. They came from the farm, from the store, from the office, and workshop; from every trade and profession, till Virginia bristled with bayonets, from the driftwood of the Ohio to the sands of the seashore. There were those who were not of our race, but were adopted from other climes, who stood with us. I would not forget them. Some months ago, while in this city, I visited the Jewish Cemetery, and saw the plat
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.42
make war upon any one. They only asked to be let alone. They asked for no property, and demanded nothing except the recognition of their rights to govern their own affairs. These States formed another union of States, known as the Confederate States of America. Our northern brethren did not interpret the Constitution as we did. They denied our right to sever connection with the Union. They declared that we were rebels in a state of rebellion, and they resorted to arms to enforce the laws of the United States, and to compel obedience to its authority. We believed we were right, and, believing this, we had the manhood to dare maintain it. The gage of battle was tendered, and we accepted it. To arms, to arms, was echoed throughout the land. The bugle-call was heard from every hilltop, and throughout every valley. Fathers, husbands, sons, brothers, and sweethearts, gave the farewell kiss, and pressed forward to repel the foe, that as we honestly believe, was invading our territ
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.42
General Lee's Birthday. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, Jan. 20, 1898 ] The anniversary very generally observed in Richmond. Light of the Camp fire of R. E. Lee Camp, no. 1, C. V. Many Veterans gather in its genial Glow—Captain R. S. Parks delivers a splendid Oration—Howitzers salute the monument. The anniversary Association, of Washington, D. C., was read and received with applause: Washington, D. C., January 19, 1898. R. E. Lee Camp, No. 1, Confederate Veterans, Richmond, Va.: The Confederate Veterans' Association of Washington assembled to honor the name of our great leader, General R. E. Lee, send loving greetings to their comrr with them a vow to keep green his memory. Robert I. Fleming, President. Adjutant J. Taylor Stratton was instructed to telegraph the following reply: Richmond, Va., January 19, 1898. Colonel Robert I. Fleming, President Confederate Veterans' Association, Washington, D. C.: R. E. Lee Camp, Confederate Veterans, reciproc
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.42
gage of battle was tendered, and we accepted it. To arms, to arms, was echoed throughout the land. The bugle-call was heard from every hilltop, and throughout every valley. Fathers, husbands, sons, brothers, and sweethearts, gave the farewell kiss, and pressed forward to repel the foe, that as we honestly believe, was invading our territory. From every State came the sons of the South. From the plains of Texas, from the States washed by the Gulf, from across the Father of Waters, from Tennessee, Kentucky, and Maryland, from the Carolinas and Florida, from every State of the Southland they came. They came from the farm, from the store, from the office, and workshop; from every trade and profession, till Virginia bristled with bayonets, from the driftwood of the Ohio to the sands of the seashore. There were those who were not of our race, but were adopted from other climes, who stood with us. I would not forget them. Some months ago, while in this city, I visited the Jewish Ce
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.42
he had endeavored to follow that of his Divine Master. Greetings from Washington. The following telegram from the Confederate Veterans' Association, of Washington, D. C., was read and received with applause: Washington, D. C., January 19, 1898. R. E. Lee Camp, No. 1, Confederate Veterans, Richmond, Va.: The ConfederatWashington, D. C., January 19, 1898. R. E. Lee Camp, No. 1, Confederate Veterans, Richmond, Va.: The Confederate Veterans' Association of Washington assembled to honor the name of our great leader, General R. E. Lee, send loving greetings to their comrades of Richmond, and remember with them a vow to keep green his memory. Robert I. Fleming, President. Adjutant J. Taylor Stratton was instructed to telegraph the following reply: Richmond, Va., January 19, 1898. Colonel Robert I. Fleming, President Confederate Veterans' Association, Washington, D. C.: R. E. Lee Camp, Confederate Veterans, reciprocates your kindly greeting, and pledges eternal fidelity to the memory of our illustrious chieftain. A. C. Peay, Lieutenant-Commander, Commanding. Captain Park
John E. Laughton (search for this): chapter 1.42
sion was infectious and irresistible, and even old men, whose locks were hoary, and whose forms were bent with age, danced and sang, and seemed to grow young again. Old Southern melodies struck pleasantly on the ear, and the familiar songs were sung over and over again. Refreshments were served in great abundance, and the hour for parting came all too soon. The formal programme. It was nearly a quarter-past 8 o'clock when FirstLieutenant-Com-mander A. C. Peay, in the absence of Commander Laughton, called the assemblage to order, and in a few words recalled the sacred cause which they had come together to celebrate. The doxology was sung by all, standing, after which Hon. J. Taylor Ellyson was called upon and offered a short, but fervent, prayer for a benediction upon those who had come together to commemorate the memory of their chieftain, and asked that they might follow his example, as he had endeavored to follow that of his Divine Master. Greetings from Washington. Th
Alexander Archer (search for this): chapter 1.42
away, Sped with smiles that changed to tears? Lee yet leads the lines of gray- Stonewall still rides down this way; They are Fame's through all the years. Given vote of thanks. Captain Parks was frequently applauded during his speech, and at its close he received quite an ovation. Captain Stratton moved that the thanks of the camp should be extended to the distinguished speaker for his eloquent and patriotic oration, and the motion was seconded, though before it could be put Captain Alex. Archer moved to amend it so as to include the thanks of the entire audience. The amendment was accepted, and the motion adopted by a rising vote. The Tony Miller Combination played several selections, and Mr. Eugene Davis, Sr., by special request, sang several dialect songs, which were liberally applauded. Judge Farrar speaks. Judge F. R. Farrar was called upon by Commander Peay, and responded very happily. He prefaced his remarks with a graceful compliment to Captain Parks, and
great abundance, and the hour for parting came all too soon. The formal programme. It was nearly a quarter-past 8 o'clock when FirstLieutenant-Com-mander A. C. Peay, in the absence of Commander Laughton, called the assemblage to order, and in a few words recalled the sacred cause which they had come together to celebrate. ton, D. C.: R. E. Lee Camp, Confederate Veterans, reciprocates your kindly greeting, and pledges eternal fidelity to the memory of our illustrious chieftain. A. C. Peay, Lieutenant-Commander, Commanding. Captain Parks' fine address. Captain Parks was then introduced as the orator of the evening, and was cordially receivee Davis, Sr., by special request, sang several dialect songs, which were liberally applauded. Judge Farrar speaks. Judge F. R. Farrar was called upon by Commander Peay, and responded very happily. He prefaced his remarks with a graceful compliment to Captain Parks, and said he had no desire to mar the perfect autonomy, as h
J. Taylor Stratton (search for this): chapter 1.42
ssociation of Washington assembled to honor the name of our great leader, General R. E. Lee, send loving greetings to their comrades of Richmond, and remember with them a vow to keep green his memory. Robert I. Fleming, President. Adjutant J. Taylor Stratton was instructed to telegraph the following reply: Richmond, Va., January 19, 1898. Colonel Robert I. Fleming, President Confederate Veterans' Association, Washington, D. C.: R. E. Lee Camp, Confederate Veterans, reciprocates your yet leads the lines of gray- Stonewall still rides down this way; They are Fame's through all the years. Given vote of thanks. Captain Parks was frequently applauded during his speech, and at its close he received quite an ovation. Captain Stratton moved that the thanks of the camp should be extended to the distinguished speaker for his eloquent and patriotic oration, and the motion was seconded, though before it could be put Captain Alex. Archer moved to amend it so as to include the
R. S. Parks (search for this): chapter 1.42
. E. Lee Camp, no. 1, C. V. Many Veterans gather in its genial Glow—Captain R. S. Parks delivers a splendid Oration—Howitzers salute the monument. The annivedead chieftain. The feature of the evening was the address delivered by Captain R. S. Parks. It was received with unbounded enthusiasm, and was said by many of thor illustrious chieftain. A. C. Peay, Lieutenant-Commander, Commanding. Captain Parks' fine address. Captain Parks was then introduced as the orator of the evCaptain Parks was then introduced as the orator of the evening, and was cordially received. After an appropriate introduction, he said: Borne on the rapid, tireless wings of time, nearly thirty-three years have passed his way; They are Fame's through all the years. Given vote of thanks. Captain Parks was frequently applauded during his speech, and at its close he received quponded very happily. He prefaced his remarks with a graceful compliment to Captain Parks, and said he had no desire to mar the perfect autonomy, as he wittily terme
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