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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Florence, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
ck was constantly in command of his regiment; he was at Tullyfinny and other engagements on the coast, until the advance of General Sherman's right wing from Port Royal Ferry, through South Carolina, when General Hardee assigned the 3d regiment to duty on General's Sherman's right flank, which placed Colonel Colcock's command between Charleston and the enemy during the movement of the troops from that city to North Carolina. The 3d cavalry was in a number of small engagements, notably near Florence, and were uniformly successful, and finally reached Goldsboro, N. C., the day that President Davis met General Joseph E. Johnston in conference. Colonel Colcock heard there of General Lee's surrender. As is well known, this was soon followed by the capitulation of General Johnston's army and the end of the war. At Union Court House, where the regiment had been ordered, President Davis passing through, sent for Colonel Colcock, informed him that the war was virtually over, that it was usel
Barnwell Court House (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
he was a great granddaughter of Judge William Smith, on the Supreme Bench of New York, in Colonial days. He was the favorite grandson of Judge Colcock, for whom he was named, and with whom he lived from youth to manhood. Colonel Colcock was a handsome man, of engaging manners, vivacious and charming in conversation, he made friends everywhere. His ruddy complection and hazel brown eyes were inherited from his mother, who was a beautiful woman. He was born ten miles south of Barnwell Court House, at Bolling Springs, on April 30, 1820. He first married Miss Caroline Heyward, granddaughter of Thomas Heyward, signer of the Declaration of Independence, and had two children, Caroline and John, both deceased, the latter having fought as a soldier through the late war. In 1851 he married Miss Lucy Frances Horton, of Huntsville, Ala., whose father was a lawyer from Virginia and whose mother was Miss Otey, also from Virginia. By this marriage he had three children, Charles Jone
Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
where. His ruddy complection and hazel brown eyes were inherited from his mother, who was a beautiful woman. He was born ten miles south of Barnwell Court House, at Bolling Springs, on April 30, 1820. He first married Miss Caroline Heyward, granddaughter of Thomas Heyward, signer of the Declaration of Independence, and had two children, Caroline and John, both deceased, the latter having fought as a soldier through the late war. In 1851 he married Miss Lucy Frances Horton, of Huntsville, Ala., whose father was a lawyer from Virginia and whose mother was Miss Otey, also from Virginia. By this marriage he had three children, Charles Jones, now head master of the Porter Military Academy, Frances Horton, assistant professor of mathematics at the South Carolina College, and Errol Hay, who died at the age of 21. In December, 1864, he married Miss, Agnes Bostick, of Beaufort District, daughter of Mr. Benjamin Bostick, who now survives him. It is a romantic circumstance that thi
Goldsboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
y and other engagements on the coast, until the advance of General Sherman's right wing from Port Royal Ferry, through South Carolina, when General Hardee assigned the 3d regiment to duty on General's Sherman's right flank, which placed Colonel Colcock's command between Charleston and the enemy during the movement of the troops from that city to North Carolina. The 3d cavalry was in a number of small engagements, notably near Florence, and were uniformly successful, and finally reached Goldsboro, N. C., the day that President Davis met General Joseph E. Johnston in conference. Colonel Colcock heard there of General Lee's surrender. As is well known, this was soon followed by the capitulation of General Johnston's army and the end of the war. At Union Court House, where the regiment had been ordered, President Davis passing through, sent for Colonel Colcock, informed him that the war was virtually over, that it was useless to attempt to cross the Mississippi and join General Kirby Sm
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
cancelled, as the crops were all lost. After his second marriage, Colonel Colcock entered commercial life in Charleston as a member of the cotton firm of Fackler, Colcock & Co., which did a large business, receiving cotton from North Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee and South Carolina, Charleston then being the chief market for several cotton growing States. This firm was a branch of the great factorage house of Bradley, Wilson & Co., of New Orleans. By a curious coincidence the completion anle of Honey Hill properly belongs to this memoir, and should be related here. Colonel Colcock was in command of the 3d military district, in which the battle was fought. Of course when Major-General Gustavus W. Smith, with the small force of Georgia infantry, arrived on the field the question of command was definitely settled, but they graduate gentlemen as well as soldiers at West Point. General Smith, as a soldier, knew that Colonel Colcock was very familiar with the locality, that he mus
Okatee River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
s a romantic circumstance that this wedding had to be postponed for three days because it had been first appointed for the very same day on which the battle of Honey Hill was fought. The following children were born of this union: Catherine, now Mrs. Robert Guerard; Helen McIver, now Mrs. C. C. Gregorie; Woodward, William and Agnes. Of the last three William alone survives. Colonel Colcock married at the early age of nineteen, and at first lived on his plantation, Bonnie Doon, on the Okatie river, near Grahamville, spending his summers at this latter place, this community noted as was Bluffton, his later home, for culture, refinement and hospitality. Later he purchased a plantation where the Colleton river empties into the Broad, and next to Foot Point, his hospitable house with broad piazzas, commanded several fine views of the Broad river and the beautiful Port Royal region. It was here that he was a planter of sea island cotton. Colonel Colcock had a good school educati
Hampton county (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
ted and Incorruptable citizen. Seven years ago, on the 22nd of October, 1891, one of the best of citizens and a gallant soldier in the gloomiest times, (my words are weighed and measured) entered into rest at Elmwood, his plantation in Hampton county; his remains were buried at Stoney Creek Church. When this sad news went forth who, that knew and appreciated him living, will forget the pang inflicted? In South Carolina it was quickly realized that a courtly gentleman, a gallant soldely furnishing capital to meet these new conditions, sea island planting was largely deferred. He moved his family to Savannah, Ga., and engaged in the life-insurance business, for which he was well qualified. He finally made his home in Hampton county, and planted short staple cotton with some measure of success in difficult times. This too imperfect tribute of respect is finished. Would it were worthier. I could do no less in memory of one gone before, who filled my eye in early life
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
ce the proceeds in England pending the issue; this he indignantly refused to do and forbade any further remark on the subject, saying: Rather than exhibit such a want of faith in Southern success, and so weaken the faith of others, I will cheerfully submit to the loss of all the property I possess should the North eventually triumph. When the war had ended and the planters on the coast had no resources with which to commence their planting operations, Colonel Colcock proposed that the United States goverment issue to the planters on credit the large supplies which had been prepared for the Union soldiers on the coast. This was done, and it enabled many to start planting who would otherwise have had no resources. Eventually the debts were cancelled, as the crops were all lost. After his second marriage, Colonel Colcock entered commercial life in Charleston as a member of the cotton firm of Fackler, Colcock & Co., which did a large business, receiving cotton from North Alabama
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
nd and was full of plans and projects of both private and public character. In those days there was only one daily steamboat connection between Charleston and Savannah, and great inconvenience was felt in the intervening tide-water section, for want of more direct transportation facilities. At an entertainment given to a numbelection was made known, with its attendant excitement. The sentiment of resistance was largely developed at these festivities, where the eloquence of Bartow, of Savannah, and (Alfred) Huger, of Charleston, electrified the great assemblages. After the death of his second wife from pneumonia a new phase of Colonel Colcock's lifemoney, which prevented factors from freely furnishing capital to meet these new conditions, sea island planting was largely deferred. He moved his family to Savannah, Ga., and engaged in the life-insurance business, for which he was well qualified. He finally made his home in Hampton county, and planted short staple cotton wit
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
spicuous figure, a man of ability, piety, courage and public spirit. His wife, Mary Woodward Hutson, was one of a noted family of attractive women; their sons were Thomas H., a planter; John, a merchant of Charleston; Richard W., a graduate of West Point, and superintendent of the Citadel Academy, 1844-52; William F., member of Congress for two terms, 1849-53, and collector of the Port of Charleston, 1853-61. The subject of this brief memoir was the eldest son of Thomas H. Colcock and Mary , in which the battle was fought. Of course when Major-General Gustavus W. Smith, with the small force of Georgia infantry, arrived on the field the question of command was definitely settled, but they graduate gentlemen as well as soldiers at West Point. General Smith, as a soldier, knew that Colonel Colcock was very familiar with the locality, that he must depend on him for information of the field; he, therefore, with rare courtesy, requested him to remain in command of the battle line, and
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