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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
Troops. Mitchel Post, G. A. R. Florida Division United Confederate Veterans. Float drawn by four gray horses, upon which were Young Ladies representing the Confederate States and the States and Indian Territory having troops in the Confederate Army, as follows: Confederate States—Miss Belle Dewson. South Carolina—Miss Mai N. Colcock. Mississippi—Miss Julia Stockton. Florida—Miss Elizabeth Legere Fleming. Alabama—Miss Kitty L. Roby. Georgia—Miss Minnie Sollee. Louisiana—Miss Marie M. Prioleau. Texas—Miss Annie Champlain. Virginia—Miss Anna Virginia Taliaferro. Arkansas—Miss Julia Cook. North Carolina—Miss Mamie Rogers. Tennessee—Miss Aline Buckman. Missouri—Miss Ruby DuPont. Kentucky—Miss Isabelle Livingston. Maryland—Miss Mary T. Fleming. Indian Territory—Miss Lena Dancy. Each young lady was attired in white, with a broad red sash, on which, in white letters, was the name of the State represented.
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
n any land, and such as that would hardly be deemed possible in any but America. To the sounds of martial strains they marched, the blue uniform of a reunited nation leading its grizzled veterans of the gray of former years. The Starry Cross and the Star Spangled Banner mingled in the same procession, and no one murmured. Splendid tributes of praise to Confederate heroes fell from eloquent lips to shouts welcomed by approval, which rose from the throats of the North and the South alike. Illinois and Virginia, Iowa and North Carolina, Wisconsin and New Jersey, through their soldiers, joined with Florida in honor to those who fought and bled and died for the Lost Cause, the cause which in the words of one speaker, went down in defeat, but not in dishonor. Enthusiasm not effected. The sun dawned yesterday on another day of heat and discomfort, but it effected not the enthusiasm of those who had looked forward for months to the occasion, which was to see the erection and dedic
Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
as that would hardly be deemed possible in any but America. To the sounds of martial strains they marched, the blue uniform of a reunited nation leading its grizzled veterans of the gray of former years. The Starry Cross and the Star Spangled Banner mingled in the same procession, and no one murmured. Splendid tributes of praise to Confederate heroes fell from eloquent lips to shouts welcomed by approval, which rose from the throats of the North and the South alike. Illinois and Virginia, Iowa and North Carolina, Wisconsin and New Jersey, through their soldiers, joined with Florida in honor to those who fought and bled and died for the Lost Cause, the cause which in the words of one speaker, went down in defeat, but not in dishonor. Enthusiasm not effected. The sun dawned yesterday on another day of heat and discomfort, but it effected not the enthusiasm of those who had looked forward for months to the occasion, which was to see the erection and dedication of the Hemming
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
rginia Volunteers. 4th Illinois Volunteers. Wilson Battery, Florida State Troops. Mitchel Post, G. A. R. Florida Division United Confederate Veterans. Float drawn by four gray horses, upon which were Young Ladies representing the Confederate States and the States and Indian Territory having troops in the Confederate Army, as follows: Confederate States—Miss Belle Dewson. South Carolina—Miss Mai N. Colcock. Mississippi—Miss Julia Stockton. Florida—Miss Elizabeth Legere FlemConfederate States—Miss Belle Dewson. South Carolina—Miss Mai N. Colcock. Mississippi—Miss Julia Stockton. Florida—Miss Elizabeth Legere Fleming. Alabama—Miss Kitty L. Roby. Georgia—Miss Minnie Sollee. Louisiana—Miss Marie M. Prioleau. Texas—Miss Annie Champlain. Virginia—Miss Anna Virginia Taliaferro. Arkansas—Miss Julia Cook. North Carolina—Miss Mamie Rogers. Tennessee—Miss Aline Buckman. Missouri—Miss Ruby DuPont. Kentucky—Miss Isabelle Livingston. Maryland—Miss Mary T. Fleming. Indian Territory—Miss Lena Dancy. Each young lady was attired in white, with a br
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
n Territory having troops in the Confederate Army, as follows: Confederate States—Miss Belle Dewson. South Carolina—Miss Mai N. Colcock. Mississippi—Miss Julia Stockton. Florida—Miss Elizabeth Legere Fleming. Alabama—Miss Kitty L. Roby. Georgia—Miss Minnie Sollee. Louisiana—Miss Marie M. Prioleau. Texas—Miss Annie Champlain. Virginia—Miss Anna Virginia Taliaferro. Arkansas—Miss Julia Cook. North Carolina—Miss Mamie Rogers. Tennessee—Miss Aline Buckman. Missouri—Miss Ruby DuPont. Kentucky—Miss Isabelle Livingston. Maryland—Miss Mary T. Fleming. Indian Territory—Miss Lena Dancy. Each young lady was attired in white, with a broad red sash, on which, in white letters, was the name of the State represented. The float was the most effective feature of the procession. Sons of Confederate Veterans. Carriages with Governor W. D. Bloxham and Staff. Col. R. H. M. Davidson, Orator of the Day. Miss Sarah Eliza
Jacksonville (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
Confederate dead of Florida. The ceremonies attending unveiling of the monument to, at Jacksonville, Florida, June 16, 1898. [extract from account of unveiling by Florida Times Union and Citizen.] Presented by Charles C. Hemming, of Gainesville, Texas, formerly of Jacksonville, Florida, and member of 3d Florida infantry, C. S. A. Should the captious critics of American institutions or the observer of Republican principles require evidence of their stability, more than the story that one hundred and twenty years have given, they would have found convincing proof in the scene which Jacksonville witnessed yesterday. A thousand young men, the flower of the Seventh corps of the United States Army, escorted Confederate Veteranearly hour the streets were filled with the throngs of those who had come from other parts of the State to mingle with Jacksonville's citizens in the ceremonies. The line of march made known through the press was lined with crowds who were anxious t
Gainesville (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
Confederate dead of Florida. The ceremonies attending unveiling of the monument to, at Jacksonville, Florida, June 16, 1898. [extract from account of unveiling by Florida Times Union and Citizen.] Presented by Charles C. Hemming, of Gainesville, Texas, formerly of Jacksonville, Florida, and member of 3d Florida infantry, C. S. A. Should the captious critics of American institutions or the observer of Republican principles require evidence of their stability, more than the story that one hundred and twenty years have given, they would have found convincing proof in the scene which Jacksonville witnessed yesterday. A thousand young men, the flower of the Seventh corps of the United States Army, escorted Confederate Veterans of thirty-five years ago through the streets of the city to the dedication of a monument erected by the generosity of one of Florida's sons, to the memory of Florida heroes who fell in the war which estranged for four years those who had been before
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
ed possible in any but America. To the sounds of martial strains they marched, the blue uniform of a reunited nation leading its grizzled veterans of the gray of former years. The Starry Cross and the Star Spangled Banner mingled in the same procession, and no one murmured. Splendid tributes of praise to Confederate heroes fell from eloquent lips to shouts welcomed by approval, which rose from the throats of the North and the South alike. Illinois and Virginia, Iowa and North Carolina, Wisconsin and New Jersey, through their soldiers, joined with Florida in honor to those who fought and bled and died for the Lost Cause, the cause which in the words of one speaker, went down in defeat, but not in dishonor. Enthusiasm not effected. The sun dawned yesterday on another day of heat and discomfort, but it effected not the enthusiasm of those who had looked forward for months to the occasion, which was to see the erection and dedication of the Hemming Monument. At an early hour
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
. Wilson Battery, Florida State Troops. Mitchel Post, G. A. R. Florida Division United Confederate Veterans. Float drawn by four gray horses, upon which were Young Ladies representing the Confederate States and the States and Indian Territory having troops in the Confederate Army, as follows: Confederate States—Miss Belle Dewson. South Carolina—Miss Mai N. Colcock. Mississippi—Miss Julia Stockton. Florida—Miss Elizabeth Legere Fleming. Alabama—Miss Kitty L. Roby. Georgia—Miss Minnie Sollee. Louisiana—Miss Marie M. Prioleau. Texas—Miss Annie Champlain. Virginia—Miss Anna Virginia Taliaferro. Arkansas—Miss Julia Cook. North Carolina—Miss Mamie Rogers. Tennessee—Miss Aline Buckman. Missouri—Miss Ruby DuPont. Kentucky—Miss Isabelle Livingston. Maryland—Miss Mary T. Fleming. Indian Territory—Miss Lena Dancy. Each young lady was attired in white, with a broad red sash, on which, in white letters, was the
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
States and the States and Indian Territory having troops in the Confederate Army, as follows: Confederate States—Miss Belle Dewson. South Carolina—Miss Mai N. Colcock. Mississippi—Miss Julia Stockton. Florida—Miss Elizabeth Legere Fleming. Alabama—Miss Kitty L. Roby. Georgia—Miss Minnie Sollee. Louisiana—Miss Marie M. Prioleau. Texas—Miss Annie Champlain. Virginia—Miss Anna Virginia Taliaferro. Arkansas—Miss Julia Cook. North Carolina—Miss Mamie Rogers. Tennessee—Miss Aline Buckman. Missouri—Miss Ruby DuPont. Kentucky—Miss Isabelle Livingston. Maryland—Miss Mary T. Fleming. Indian Territory—Miss Lena Dancy. Each young lady was attired in white, with a broad red sash, on which, in white letters, was the name of the State represented. The float was the most effective feature of the procession. Sons of Confederate Veterans. Carriages with Governor W. D. Bloxham and Staff. Col. R. H. M. Davidson, Orato
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