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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
ers, my next younger brother and I getting off so as to catch the train indicated, father and my youngest, and then noncombatant, brother following later. The United States Deputy Marshal, in fact, came to the house to arrest us not long after we had left. We reached Washington and got safely across the river to Alexandria; butl of Virginia, was an intimate friend of my father, who had now arrived in Richmond, and suggested to him that Mr. Beers and I, being citizens, not only of the United States, but of the State of Connecticut, where I had recently cast my first vote, were in rather an exceptional position, as bearing upon a possible charge of treasonin case we should enlist in the military service. The suggestion was deemed of sufficient importance to refer to Mr. Benjamin, then Attorney-General of the Confederate States, and Mr. Tucker and I interviewed him about it. These two great lawyers expressed the view that the principles which protected citizens of the Southern Stat
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
, October 29, 1899. Grave in Hollywood recalls a story of devotion to duty. Came South to fight with us. James H. Beers, of Connecticut, who fell at Chancellorsville—Ran the gauntlet when he left Home—Services for the Confederacy. Within the last few days there has been placed over a low mound in my family lot in Hollywood, a simple granite marker bearing this inscription: James H. Beers, of Connectcut, who fell at Chancellorsville fighting for Virginia and the South, May 3, 1863. The erection of this modest stone not only marks the discharge of an obligation, richly merited and long deferred, but it also epitomizes a li Davidson's company, to which he belonged—who told me that my Yankee was the finest gunner in the battery and fought like a Turk. Between Malvern Hill and Chancellorsville I saw Beers perhaps two or three times—I think once in Richmond, shortly after his wife and children and my mother and sisters arrived from the North. I
New Haven (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
years agone, passed upon the chief actor in this strange story and probably also upon most of his relatives living when he died—yet there may be others now living to whom the record of his life and death must needs be somewhat painful; therefore, we will tell the story simply and quietly, as far as possible, without the exaggeration of passion or prejudice. When I first knew Mr. Beers he was an intelligent young mechanic—originally, I think, from Bridgeport, but at the time living in New Haven, Conn., where I was a college student, we both being members of a Bible class connected with a church of which my father, Rev. Joseph C. Stiles, was then pastor, and Mr. Gerard Hallock, of the New York Journal of Commerce, the most prominent member. Shortly after my first acquaintance with Beers, Mr. Hallock became interested in him, being attracted by his regular attendance upon the services of the church and Bible class and his modest yet self-respectful and intelligent bearing, and he s
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
t the principles which protected citizens of the Southern States were, to say the least, of doubtful application to us, and that it would probably go rather hard with us if we should be captured. Notwithstanding, I enlisted, and Beers would doubtless have done so with equal promptness, had he not been an expert mechanic—men so qualified being then very scarce in Richmond and very much needed. He was requested to assist in the work of transferring some old flint-locks belonging to the State of Virginia into percussion muskets, and all of us insisting that he could thus render far more valuable service than by enlisting in the ranks, he rather reluctantly yielded and went to work. How long he was thus employed I do not know. Things were moving on rapidly. The hostile lines were facing each other at Manassas, and then the great battle shocked and shook the entire continent. Junior Company F hung fire too long; so, the morning after the battle, my brother and I, without saying by
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
ine gunner and fighter. I saw but little of Beers after this. Just when he joined the Army I cannot say, but I know that it must have been some time before the battles around Richmond in the early summer of 1862; for, on the battlefield of Malvern Hill, I met some of the men of the Letcher Artillery—Greenlee Davidson's company, to which he belonged—who told me that my Yankee was the finest gunner in the battery and fought like a Turk. Between Malvern Hill and Chancellorsville I saw Beers Malvern Hill and Chancellorsville I saw Beers perhaps two or three times—I think once in Richmond, shortly after his wife and children and my mother and sisters arrived from the North. I have seldom seen a better looking soldier. He was about five feet eleven inches in height, had fine shoulders, chest and limbs, a handsome, manly figure, carried his head high, had clustering brown hair, a steel grey eye and a splendid sweeping mustache. Every now and then I heard, from some man or officer of his battery, or of Pegram's Battalion, some<
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
It was obedience even unto death. From the Richmond, Va., Times, October 29, 1899. Grave in Hollywood recalls a story of devotion to duty. Came South to fight with us. James H. Beers, of Connecticut, who fell at Chancellorsville—Ran the gauntlet when he left Home—Services for the Confederacy. Within the last few days there has been placed over a low mound in my family lot in Hollywood, a simple granite marker bearing this inscription: James H. Beers, of Connectcut, nt. Mr. Ran. Tucker, then, I believe, Attorney-General of Virginia, was an intimate friend of my father, who had now arrived in Richmond, and suggested to him that Mr. Beers and I, being citizens, not only of the United States, but of the State of Connecticut, where I had recently cast my first vote, were in rather an exceptional position, as bearing upon a possible charge of treason, in case we should enlist in the military service. The suggestion was deemed of sufficient importance to refer
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
It was obedience even unto death. From the Richmond, Va., Times, October 29, 1899. Grave in Hollywood recalls a story of devotion to duty. Came South to fight with us. James H. Beers, of Connecticut, who fell at Chancellorsville—Ran the gauntlet when he left Home—Services for the Confederacy. Within the last few days there has been placed over a low mound in my family lot in Hollywood, a simple granite marker bearing this inscription: James H. Beers, of Connectcut, ndeed low and humble, yet, where will you dig in earth's surface to find a handful of richer dust? I rejoice that he lies where he does, hard by my dear ones, and where my own body will soon rest; so that, when the resurrection trump shall call us all forth, after running over the roll of my beloved and finding them all present and accounted for, I can turn my eyes to the right and greet the hero whose sacred dust I have guarded all these years. Robt. Stiles. Richmond, Va., October 4,. 18
Hollywood (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
It was obedience even unto death. From the Richmond, Va., Times, October 29, 1899. Grave in Hollywood recalls a story of devotion to duty. Came South to fight with us. James H. Beers, of Connecticut, who fell at Chancellorsville—Ran the gauntlet when he left Home—Services for the Confederacy. Within the last few days there has been placed over a low mound in my family lot in Hollywood, a simple granite marker bearing this inscription: James H. Beers, of Connectcut, who fell at Chancellorsville fighting for Virginia and the South, May 3, 1863. The erection of this modest stone not only marks the discharge of an obligati everything connected with the matter, except the sad scene at the grave, seems to have faded out of my recollection. I know he was buried in our family lot in Hollywood, and, as no one of us was buried there for long years after this, we must have bought the lot for the purpose. Yes; I remember, too, that we laid him to rest wi
East Franklin street, with the balance of the last rebel reinforcement from the North. I wish I had at hand the means of determining the exact dates of these occurrences, but can only say we arrived in Richmond some time before the battle of Bethel, my brother and I volunteering in what was called Junior Company F, which was at that time recruiting and drilling in a basement room under the Spotswood Hotel, the drill master of our squad being the lamented John H., familiarly known as Jock Ellerson. An adventure. A day or two after his arrival another unfortunate and most unpleasant accident befel poor Beers. He had gone out alone after dinner and did not return. He was not a man to be taken at a disadvantage by an emergency, but the city was full of excitement and his position was a delicate one, and as time passed and the runners we had sent out in every direction failed to bring any news of him, we became anxious and apprehensive. At last, sometime after dark, we heard tha
Paul Michaux (search for this): chapter 1.2
d went to work. How long he was thus employed I do not know. Things were moving on rapidly. The hostile lines were facing each other at Manassas, and then the great battle shocked and shook the entire continent. Junior Company F hung fire too long; so, the morning after the battle, my brother and I, without saying by your leave to any one, boarded the train bound for Manassas Junction, in company with Billy Wait (son of Dr. J. G. Wait, the distinguished dentist of that day) and old Paul Michaux, of the First Company of Richmond Howitzers—they undertaking to conceal us on the train until it started and to secure our enrollment in the company when we arrived—both of which undertakings they most skilfully and faithfully performed. Fine gunner and fighter. I saw but little of Beers after this. Just when he joined the Army I cannot say, but I know that it must have been some time before the battles around Richmond in the early summer of 1862; for, on the battlefield of Malvern
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