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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Abbeville, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
Orr's South Carolina Rifles. [from the Abbeville, S. C., Medium, July 20, 1899 ] Brief Sketch of the famous regiment from the pen of one who fought in its ranks. By J. W. Mattison, of Company G. Orr's Regiment of Rifles went into camp of instruction at Sandy Springs camp ground, ten miles above Anderson C. H., July 19th, 1861, with the following field officers: James L. Orr, colonel; J. Foster Marshall, lieutenant-colonel; Daniel Ledbetter, major; Ben. Sloan, adjutant; T. B. Lee, sergeant-major; Company A, J. W. Livingston, captain; Company B, James M. Perrin, captain; Company C, J. J. Norton, captain; Company D, F. E. Harrison, captain; Company E, Miles M. Norton, captain; Company F, Robert A. Hawthorn, captain; Company G; G. McD. Miller, captain; Company H, George M. Fairlee, captain; Company K, G. W. Cox, captain; Company L, J. B. Moore, captain. The regiment was composed of the ten companies of one hundred men each—Companies B and G from Abbeville county; Companies A,
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
nd in the afternoon on the Fredericksburg road, reaching Guiney's Station after night. Tents were pitched in short order and a good night's rest obtained. The next morning (April 24th), when reville sounded we formed line in about three inches of snow. After remaining stationed a few days we were moved nearer Fredericksburg, to a point near Massaponax church, picketing the roads towards Fredericksburg. We remained in this camp until the last week in May, when General Johnson evacuated Yorktown and Peninsula and withdrew his forces to around Richmond. The commands near Fredericksburg were ordered to Richmond. When we reached Ashland we met some of our cavalry who had that day engaged the enemy on our extreme left wing. Branch's brigade and the cavalry had driven the enemy back before we reached the field. The next day we reached the Chickahominy above Richmond and camped in a low marshy piece of Woodland. The night of the 29th was a night of continued downpour of rain, our
Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
at once. Our surplus baggage was packed and sent home at once. On Sunday, April 20th, we left the Island rejocing that we were going to the seat of war. The regiment was called by other troops The pound cake regiment, because of our easy position. Our trip to Richmond was slow and tedious. We left Charleston on the evening of April 20th. When we reached Florence we were delayed the balance of the night. Monday night we reached Wilmington and remained there all night. Tusday we made Weldon. Wednesday morning we took breakfast at Petersburg, Va., and reached Richmond about 12 o'clock noon. We left Richmond in the afternoon on the Fredericksburg road, reaching Guiney's Station after night. Tents were pitched in short order and a good night's rest obtained. The next morning (April 24th), when reville sounded we formed line in about three inches of snow. After remaining stationed a few days we were moved nearer Fredericksburg, to a point near Massaponax church, picketing the r
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
e at once. On Sunday, April 20th, we left the Island rejocing that we were going to the seat of war. The regiment was called by other troops The pound cake regiment, because of our easy position. Our trip to Richmond was slow and tedious. We left Charleston on the evening of April 20th. When we reached Florence we were delayed the balance of the night. Monday night we reached Wilmington and remained there all night. Tusday we made Weldon. Wednesday morning we took breakfast at Petersburg, Va., and reached Richmond about 12 o'clock noon. We left Richmond in the afternoon on the Fredericksburg road, reaching Guiney's Station after night. Tents were pitched in short order and a good night's rest obtained. The next morning (April 24th), when reville sounded we formed line in about three inches of snow. After remaining stationed a few days we were moved nearer Fredericksburg, to a point near Massaponax church, picketing the roads towards Fredericksburg. We remained in this
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
t on picket line near our old camp. After crossing the creek we entered the deserted camp of the enemy, where we found immense piles of flower and bacon burning. We pushed on from this place to Walnut Grove church, something over one mile from the Mill. There we halted and rested for an hour or two. It was at this place that we first saw Stonewall Jackson. He passed us as we rested by the roadside, and his troops and Hill's Light division were now united. After a delay of some time, Jackson's command moved out along a road bearing to the left, while Hill's Light division followed the road leading direct to Gaines's Mill, some three miles distant. Between Walnut Grove church and Gaines's Mill in an open field the pontoon bridges of the enemy were abandoned and fired. Their retreat was so rapid that they did not attempt to save army supplies but applied the torch to everything that they could burn, and hurried on to their next line of defence. About 12 o'clock we reached Ga
Florence, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
ll was now Colonel of the regiment. Colonel Marshall received orders on April 19th, to report with his command at Richmond, Va., at once. Our surplus baggage was packed and sent home at once. On Sunday, April 20th, we left the Island rejocing that we were going to the seat of war. The regiment was called by other troops The pound cake regiment, because of our easy position. Our trip to Richmond was slow and tedious. We left Charleston on the evening of April 20th. When we reached Florence we were delayed the balance of the night. Monday night we reached Wilmington and remained there all night. Tusday we made Weldon. Wednesday morning we took breakfast at Petersburg, Va., and reached Richmond about 12 o'clock noon. We left Richmond in the afternoon on the Fredericksburg road, reaching Guiney's Station after night. Tents were pitched in short order and a good night's rest obtained. The next morning (April 24th), when reville sounded we formed line in about three inches of
Neshoba (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
of battle beyond a small stream on a hill. Their artillery opened on us at this point and threw some shells uncomfortably near, and gave us what is called bomb ague. Dr. Frank Clinkscales was killed by a cannon shot near the road running from New Cold Harbor to Old Cold Harbor, making two men of Company G killed by cannon shot before we had fired a gun. Our command soon reached the swampy ground, where we were allowed to rest, where we were protected from the artillery fire also. Crenshaw's battery was planted on the hill in our rear and replied to the guns of the enemy with good effect. The fire was kept up for some time with vigor. Our command remained in the ravine about one hour, I think. All the time we remained there the artillery fire was heavy on both sides. There was heavy firing also to our right near the Chickahominy and back towards Gaines's Mill. General Longstreet's command was hotly engaged on that part of the line. About three or four o'clock we were
Jehossee Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
and the balance the 6th. We remained at Summerville ten days, and from there we moved to Sullivan's Island and occupied the dwellings then standing on the island. Part of the regiment was quartered in the old Moultrie House. Daily drills were still the order of the day. About the last of November, Companies B and G were sent down the coast about twenty-five miles to picket on the Edisto river. Company B was stationed at Willtown Bluff and Company G at Pineberry, doing picket duty on Jehossee Island. During our stay at Pineberry, our pickets on the island were fired at on two occasions, but no one hurt. Some mounted low country negroes on Edisto Island attacked our picket commanded by Lieutenant Higgins and fired a few shots one morning. One of their number was killed. On another occasion a party of the enemy came up the river in yawl boats and fired on our pickets commanded by Lieutenant Latimer. After a few shots were exchanged the enemy retired and left us alone afterward
Sandy Springs (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
ina Rifles. [from the Abbeville, S. C., Medium, July 20, 1899 ] Brief Sketch of the famous regiment from the pen of one who fought in its ranks. By J. W. Mattison, of Company G. Orr's Regiment of Rifles went into camp of instruction at Sandy Springs camp ground, ten miles above Anderson C. H., July 19th, 1861, with the following field officers: James L. Orr, colonel; J. Foster Marshall, lieutenant-colonel; Daniel Ledbetter, major; Ben. Sloan, adjutant; T. B. Lee, sergeant-major; Company e of us were afraid it would all be over before we reached the front. The drills and camp duty we thought very hard. In a few weeks a majority of us thought we had at least learned all that Hardee knew about tactics. During our stay at Sandy Springs we learned very little of actual camp life. We were all quartered in tents used by tent holders at camp meetings. We had plenty to eat, such as it was, and it was roughly prepared in many cases. While we were drilled very hard, we had ma
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
on Sullivan's Island. During the winter Colonel Orr resigned his commission and entered Congress. Lieutenant-Colonel Marshall was now Colonel of the regiment. Colonel Marshall received orders on April 19th, to report with his command at Richmond, Va., at once. Our surplus baggage was packed and sent home at once. On Sunday, April 20th, we left the Island rejocing that we were going to the seat of war. The regiment was called by other troops The pound cake regiment, because of our easly cut up, and the surgeons were kept busy attending to their own wounded. They were kept busy amputating arms and legs of the wounded; other wounded could not be attended to properly. On the evening of the 29th I was moved to the hospital in Manchester and placed in the roundhouse of the Danville railroad. I remained there until the last week in August, when I was given a furlough for thirty days. I came home and remained there for two years before I was able to rejoin my command. I have
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