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Wythe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.50
ers were also nominated. On the second ballot Hugh Nelson was elected. There were three more ballotings, and Brockenbrough, advancing from 53 to 85, was elected by a joint vote of 97. The others voted for were Daniel Sheffey, who came next to Brockenbrough, James Semple, James Allen, Wm. W. Hening, and Alex. Stuart, all worthy competitors. Judge Brockenbrough was assigned to a western circuit (the Thirteenth), which, in 1811, embraced the counties of Tazewell, Russell, Lee, Washington, Wythe, Grayson, and Montgomery. He was afterwards, in 1812, brough to the more important one, embracing the city of Richmond and counties of Henrico, Essex, etc. Besides discharging faithfully and efficiently all his judicial functions, he undertook the publication of a volume entitled Virginia Cases: A collection of Cases decided by the General Court of Virginia, chiefly relating to the penal laws of the Commonwealth, commencing in the year 1798 and ending in 1814. Copied from the Records of sa
Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.50
n in the discharge of his arduous duties as circuit judge. When he was transferred to the Supreme Court of Appeals, in 1834, he was president of the general court and presiding over the Fourth district and the Seventh circuit, composed of Chesterfield, Powhatan, Goochland, Hanover and Henrico counties. There were then in the State ten districts and twenty circuits. He had for some years presided, when the arrangement was different, over the Fourth circuit, composed of Goochland, Henrico, Hanover, King and Queen, Essex, Caroline and Spotsylvania. When he had to give up Essex, it came under the jurisdiction, for one year, of Judge Brown, and then of Judge Semple. It had been in Judge Brown's district when he held his courts in Fredericksburg and Williamsburg. In 1832, the circuit courts were increased to twenty, and Judge Brown was placed over the Fourth circuit, embracing Essex. When Judge John Williams Green, of the Court of Appeals, died, his place had to be filled. The ele
Essex County (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.50
Judge William Brockenbrough. An Address delivered by Prof. Benjamin Blake Minor, Ll. D., on the occasion of the Presentation of a portrait of Judge Brockenbrough to the circuit Court of Essex county, July 17, 1899. There would be a great deficiency in any gallery of portraits appropriate for the circuit court room of Essex county, if it did not embrace one of such a man as Judge William Brockenbrough. The promoters of the collection have felt the truth of this, and have tried to obtaEssex county, if it did not embrace one of such a man as Judge William Brockenbrough. The promoters of the collection have felt the truth of this, and have tried to obtain a portrait of so distinguished a son of old Essex. But, for various reasons, their efforts were fruitless. A: length a few of those who cordially approved of getting together such galleries and of placing a likeness of Judge Brockenbrough where it so justly belonged, determined that this too long deferred honor should be paid him, even in a modified form. They have the pleasure of presenting to the circuit court of Essex an enlarged photograph of him, taken from an oil portrait belonging t
Capitol (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.50
acted illness, Judge Wm. Brockenbrough, of the Court of Appeals, in the 61st year of his age. The funeral took place on December 1, from the residence of his brother, Dr. John Brockenbrough, and the remains were taken for interment to White Plains, in King William county. The day of his decease, the judge of the circuit court of Richmond and Henrico entered upon the records of that court a strong and feeling tribute to his memory, and adjourned. The next day there was a meeting, in the capitol, of the surviving judges of the Court of Appeals, the judge of the circuit court of Richmond and Henrico, the officers of both courts, and members of the bar. On motion of Judge Henry St. George Tucker, Judge Francis T. Brooke was called to the chair, and Sidney S. Baxter, Attorney-General, appointed secretary. Mr. Leigh moved a preamble and resolutions of respect and condolence, which were unanimously adopted. Mr. Leigh's estimate of his character, ability and services was a very high on
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.50
cuit judge. When he was transferred to the Supreme Court of Appeals, in 1834, he was president of the general court and presiding over the Fourth district and the Seventh circuit, composed of Chesterfield, Powhatan, Goochland, Hanover and Henrico counties. There were then in the State ten districts and twenty circuits. He had for some years presided, when the arrangement was different, over the Fourth circuit, composed of Goochland, Henrico, Hanover, King and Queen, Essex, Caroline and Spotsylvania. When he had to give up Essex, it came under the jurisdiction, for one year, of Judge Brown, and then of Judge Semple. It had been in Judge Brown's district when he held his courts in Fredericksburg and Williamsburg. In 1832, the circuit courts were increased to twenty, and Judge Brown was placed over the Fourth circuit, embracing Essex. When Judge John Williams Green, of the Court of Appeals, died, his place had to be filled. The election for his successor took place February 20,
Goochland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.50
of his arduous duties as circuit judge. When he was transferred to the Supreme Court of Appeals, in 1834, he was president of the general court and presiding over the Fourth district and the Seventh circuit, composed of Chesterfield, Powhatan, Goochland, Hanover and Henrico counties. There were then in the State ten districts and twenty circuits. He had for some years presided, when the arrangement was different, over the Fourth circuit, composed of Goochland, Henrico, Hanover, King and QueeGoochland, Henrico, Hanover, King and Queen, Essex, Caroline and Spotsylvania. When he had to give up Essex, it came under the jurisdiction, for one year, of Judge Brown, and then of Judge Semple. It had been in Judge Brown's district when he held his courts in Fredericksburg and Williamsburg. In 1832, the circuit courts were increased to twenty, and Judge Brown was placed over the Fourth circuit, embracing Essex. When Judge John Williams Green, of the Court of Appeals, died, his place had to be filled. The election for his succ
Henrico (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.50
ards, in 1812, brough to the more important one, embracing the city of Richmond and counties of Henrico, Essex, etc. Besides discharging faithfully and efficiently all his judicial functions, he undeistrict and the Seventh circuit, composed of Chesterfield, Powhatan, Goochland, Hanover and Henrico counties. There were then in the State ten districts and twenty circuits. He had for some years presided, when the arrangement was different, over the Fourth circuit, composed of Goochland, Henrico, Hanover, King and Queen, Essex, Caroline and Spotsylvania. When he had to give up Essex, it came in King William county. The day of his decease, the judge of the circuit court of Richmond and Henrico entered upon the records of that court a strong and feeling tribute to his memory, and adjourneof the surviving judges of the Court of Appeals, the judge of the circuit court of Richmond and Henrico, the officers of both courts, and members of the bar. On motion of Judge Henry St. George Tucke
King William County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.50
n a judge of the Court of Appeals from 1834 until his death, in 1838. The Richmond Enquirer of December 1, 1838, made the following announcement: Died in the city of Richmond, yesterday morning, 10th inst., after a painful and protracted illness, Judge Wm. Brockenbrough, of the Court of Appeals, in the 61st year of his age. The funeral took place on December 1, from the residence of his brother, Dr. John Brockenbrough, and the remains were taken for interment to White Plains, in King William county. The day of his decease, the judge of the circuit court of Richmond and Henrico entered upon the records of that court a strong and feeling tribute to his memory, and adjourned. The next day there was a meeting, in the capitol, of the surviving judges of the Court of Appeals, the judge of the circuit court of Richmond and Henrico, the officers of both courts, and members of the bar. On motion of Judge Henry St. George Tucker, Judge Francis T. Brooke was called to the chair, and Sidn
Hanover County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.50
gh Holmes, Phil. C. Pendleton, Spencer Roane, John M. C. Taylor, J. G. Jackson, Thos. Wilson, Phil. Slaughter, Wm. H. Cabell, Nathl. H. Claiborne, Wm. A. G. Dade, Wm. Jones. From 1826 to 1834, Judge Brockenbrough kept on in the discharge of his arduous duties as circuit judge. When he was transferred to the Supreme Court of Appeals, in 1834, he was president of the general court and presiding over the Fourth district and the Seventh circuit, composed of Chesterfield, Powhatan, Goochland, Hanover and Henrico counties. There were then in the State ten districts and twenty circuits. He had for some years presided, when the arrangement was different, over the Fourth circuit, composed of Goochland, Henrico, Hanover, King and Queen, Essex, Caroline and Spotsylvania. When he had to give up Essex, it came under the jurisdiction, for one year, of Judge Brown, and then of Judge Semple. It had been in Judge Brown's district when he held his courts in Fredericksburg and Williamsburg. In 1
Chesterfield (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.50
s Madison, Armistead T. Mason, Hugh Holmes, Phil. C. Pendleton, Spencer Roane, John M. C. Taylor, J. G. Jackson, Thos. Wilson, Phil. Slaughter, Wm. H. Cabell, Nathl. H. Claiborne, Wm. A. G. Dade, Wm. Jones. From 1826 to 1834, Judge Brockenbrough kept on in the discharge of his arduous duties as circuit judge. When he was transferred to the Supreme Court of Appeals, in 1834, he was president of the general court and presiding over the Fourth district and the Seventh circuit, composed of Chesterfield, Powhatan, Goochland, Hanover and Henrico counties. There were then in the State ten districts and twenty circuits. He had for some years presided, when the arrangement was different, over the Fourth circuit, composed of Goochland, Henrico, Hanover, King and Queen, Essex, Caroline and Spotsylvania. When he had to give up Essex, it came under the jurisdiction, for one year, of Judge Brown, and then of Judge Semple. It had been in Judge Brown's district when he held his courts in Freder
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