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Youngtown (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
ys, let us get to our horses and be off. Once in the saddle, we drew rein for Hardesty's Store, near Annapolis, where we camped in the woods for a few days, while the Lieutenant and Charlie Vest scouted the Governor's house. Finding His Excellency more closely guarded than had been reported, they returned to camp with a sad heart to tell us of the unfruitful termination of our raid, and that we would return to Virginia on the morrow. That evening, Brune, Bowie and I were dispatched to Young's Store for Richard Belt, who desired to enlist in our command. This increased our party to ten. At the head of the little band, Lieutenant Bowie took up the line of march for Virginia, going around Washington, D. C., via Sandy Spring, Montgomery county, Md., quite a little hamlet of about fifty inhabitants. One store, owned by Mr. Alban Gilpin, supplied the good people of that vicinity with the necessities of life. Mr. Gilpin, from long experience in mercantile life, had become skilled in
Charles county (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
on, our little heroine pronounced the shibboleth so clearly that she was permitted to pass under the suspended ear of corn with us. Oars were now dipped and we were soon well out in the stream. The night was clear and cold, necessitating our keeping a close watch on the enemy's gunboats, which were much in evidence and on the alert; being watchful ourselves, however, we were enabled to make the run without being detected by the lynxeyed Yankees, effecting a landing at the Big Walnut, Charles county, Md., eight miles below Port Tobacco. After concealing his boat in the bushes, Long guided us to the house of a Southern sympathizer, who received us kindly and otherwise conduced to our comfort by giving us quarters for the night and a good hot breakfast in the morning. Here we parted with the heroine of our story, whom, I regret to say, I have not since heard from. Having said good-bye to the lady and gentleman of the house, we took up a position in a quiet spot in the woods overloo
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
n his bailliwick, and being questioned as to the character of the crew of our coveted boat, he replied favorably to a probable capitulation to a small force. At any rate the commander concluded to give her a trial. He selected John Randolph and myself to accompany him, and ordered the rest of the men to remain where they were until further orders. All aboard in Long's boat, with the latter and I at the oars, and the Lieutenant at the helm, we were about to weigh anchor, when a lady from Georgia professing to be in the secret service of the Confederate States, under orders from the War Department at Richmond to proceed to New York with important dispatches, made her appearance and requested to be allowed to cross the river under our escort. On being examined by Lieutenant Bowie for proof of her loyalty to the South and the truth of her statement concerning her mission, our little heroine pronounced the shibboleth so clearly that she was permitted to pass under the suspended ear of
Prince Georges (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
How Lieut. Walter Bowie of Mosby's command met his end. [from the Richmond, Va., Times, June 23, 1900. In the McClure Magazine for December, 1898, an account of the death of Lieutenant Walter Bowie, of Mosby's Command, appears over the signature of Roy Stannard Baker, in which he cleverly shows how Detective Trail secured the Lieutenant's shot-gun from his home in Prince George county, Maryland, and with it followed him and his two comrades while scouting in Maryland during the war between the States, and when a favorable opportunity presented itself he killed the Lieutenant by emptying both barrels of his gun, loaded with buck-shot, into his breast, and then overpowered his comrades with an empty gun! How strange to those who know differently. I read this story with interest, because of the novel sense shown in it, yet with no little astonishment, on account of the vast amount of ingenuity displayed in its make-up. To be frank, Mr. Baker so disfigured the circumstances
Rockville, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
you have them. I lost no time in adapting my No. 8 feet to his No. 7 1/2 boots. That it was a close fit goes without saying, and so long as I wore them, I was forcibly reminded of my Sandy Spring raid. Mr. Thomas has since told me that the boots I left him have served him many a good turn. Thanking Mr. Gilpin for his many kindnesses, we mounted our horses and took up a forced march for the Potomac; but alas, the night was too far spent for us to make the haven of rest and safety. Near Rockville, day broke upon us, compelling us to go to the woods for the day. Having picketed our horses and breakfasted, we were sitting around the camp, discussing the events of the past night, and the prospects of our being in old Virginia to-morrow, when our attention was called to the tramp of approaching horsemen and a voice saying, They have gone in here. We at first thought that the Federal cavalry were on our trail, but subsequent events proved that young Thomas had gotten the citizens of Sa
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
Prince George county, Maryland, and with it followed him and his two comrades while scouting in Maryland during the war between the States, and when a favorable opportunity presented itself he killed d for permission to capture His Excellency and hold him as a hostage for friends of his in southern Maryland, who had been lodged in the old Capitol prison at Washington, because of their southern prr of suspicion asked why this armed force on the sacred ground of the grand old Commonwealth of Maryland. After being assured by the commander that our visit to Maryland was of a friendly character, Maryland was of a friendly character, most cordial relations were established between us at once. But all pleasures must have an ending—a military necessity confronted us, and Bowie was not one to sacrifice duty upon the altar of pleasur gentlemen who called on us up the river. We had a jolly good time, telling war stories to our Maryland friends until the dead hour, when all good soldiers are supposed to have had taps and turned in
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
eing completed, we were ordered to meet at Upperville, Va., at a given time. Every man answered to his name at the time appointed. Lieutenant Bowie made a short address to his followers, acquainting them with the fact that on the expedition they were about to make dangers and trials awaited them. He was cheered to the echo by the men, who were armed cap-a-pie and as ready for the tilt as any knight of old. The line of march was now taken up for Mathias Point on the Potomac river, via Fredericksburg and King George Courthouse, Va., making the point of our destination the evening of the second day about dusk. Here we bivouacked on the premises of Mr. Marcus Tennant, a gentleman of culture and means, and as true to the South as the needle is to the pole. He was particularly kind to us, feeding and permitting us to sleep in his house. The next day was spent in lounging about the yard and along the shore of the river, watching the United States gun-boats passing to and fro doing scou
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
How Lieut. Walter Bowie of Mosby's command met his end. [from the Richmond, Va., Times, June 23, 1900. In the McClure Magazine for December, 1898, an account of the death of Lieutenant Walter Bowie, of Mosby's Command, appears over the signature of Roy Stannard Baker, in which he cleverly shows how Detective Trail secured the Lieutenant's shot-gun from his home in Prince George county, Maryland, and with it followed him and his two comrades while scouting in Maryland during the war ber, 1864. Lieutenant Walter Bowie, Company F, 43d Virginia Battalion (Mosby's Battalion), received intelligence that the White House at Annapolis, Md., was not guarded, and that with a small force the Governor could be captured and conveyed to Richmond, Va. This the Lieutenant reported to Colonel Mosby and asked for permission to capture His Excellency and hold him as a hostage for friends of his in southern Maryland, who had been lodged in the old Capitol prison at Washington, because of their
Mathias Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
ition. All preliminary arrangements being completed, we were ordered to meet at Upperville, Va., at a given time. Every man answered to his name at the time appointed. Lieutenant Bowie made a short address to his followers, acquainting them with the fact that on the expedition they were about to make dangers and trials awaited them. He was cheered to the echo by the men, who were armed cap-a-pie and as ready for the tilt as any knight of old. The line of march was now taken up for Mathias Point on the Potomac river, via Fredericksburg and King George Courthouse, Va., making the point of our destination the evening of the second day about dusk. Here we bivouacked on the premises of Mr. Marcus Tennant, a gentleman of culture and means, and as true to the South as the needle is to the pole. He was particularly kind to us, feeding and permitting us to sleep in his house. The next day was spent in lounging about the yard and along the shore of the river, watching the United State
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
ernor's house. Finding His Excellency more closely guarded than had been reported, they returned to camp with a sad heart to tell us of the unfruitful termination of our raid, and that we would return to Virginia on the morrow. That evening, Brune, Bowie and I were dispatched to Young's Store for Richard Belt, who desired to enlist in our command. This increased our party to ten. At the head of the little band, Lieutenant Bowie took up the line of march for Virginia, going around Washington, D. C., via Sandy Spring, Montgomery county, Md., quite a little hamlet of about fifty inhabitants. One store, owned by Mr. Alban Gilpin, supplied the good people of that vicinity with the necessities of life. Mr. Gilpin, from long experience in mercantile life, had become skilled in decorative art, as was shown by his tastefully-arranged windows. Furbelows, flounces and fine clothes were artistically displayed in them. The picture was more than the eye of Mosby's men could withstand. U
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