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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.21
Great battle of the Crater. [from the Richmond, Va., Times, May 28, 1899.] The work of Mahone and Weisiger at the fight. By George S. Bernard. Reply to a Times editorial which paid a tribute to the late General Weisiger—a discussion of the battle. Editor of The Times: Sir—In its editorial of Sunday, February 26, 1899, The Times, whilst paying a handsome tribute to the late General David A. Weisiger, makes some statements calculated to do great injustice to the memory of ttatements of General Weisiger we must understand that the Georgia Brigade had made its unsuccessful charges before he left the breastworks, and that the fighting, except that done when the Alabama Brigade was sent in, was all over. [From the Richmond, Va., Times. June 4, 1899] Editor of the Times: Sir—In last Sunday's Times in the first part of my article on the Battle of the Crater, the statement of Colonel Rogers was disarranged through fault of the type, and it should have read as fol<
Sergeant Thomas E. Richardson (search for this): chapter 1.21
our immediate rear and close enough to give any command that might have been necessary; and so was Lieutenant John E. Laughton, Jr., of Company D, 12th Virginia, who comhanded a company of the battalion of sharp-shooters on the extreme right of the line, when in a statement made in 1876 he said: Having seen General Mahone superintending the formation of the line my impression was that the order from Captain Girardey to forward came direct from General Mahone; and so too was Orderly Sergeant Thomas E. Richardson, of Company K, 12th Virginia, when in a statement made in 1876 he said: When the enemy came out of their works I was in twenty feet of General Mahone. He and Major Girardey were talking. When the move on the part of the enemy commenced, Major Girardey left General Mahone and ran to the front, giving the command, Forward men. Other statements. Were all of these men at fault in their recollections as to the presence of General Mahone in the line of battle when it wa
J. Edward Whitehorne (search for this): chapter 1.21
ood between him and the left of the brigade, Tell Weisiger to forward. At that time, it is more than probable that Girardey, exercising the authority which Mahone intended him (Girardey) to exercise when he sent to Weisiger by Hinton the message, Tell Colonel Weisiger to wait for an order from me or Captain Girardey, had authorized Weisiger to move forward as suggested by Weisiger, and that the right of the brigade line of battle had actually begun its forward movement. Orderly-Sergeant J. Edward Whitehorne, of Company F, 12th Virginia Regiment, whose company was on the extreme left of this line of battle, in a statement made in 1892, said: We lay in the position above described (on the slope of the hill) for a few minutes, when a tremendous cheer from the right greeted our ears. Looking up the line I saw that the right of the column had begun to charge. Instantly we sprang to our feet and moved forward at a double-quick. The charge of the Virginia Brigade having been ma
Thomas P. Pollard (search for this): chapter 1.21
ginia Brigade was formed by Captain Girardey under the direction of General Mahone along the line as decided by General Mahone and was kept at its post with bayonets fixed and ready to charge, he said, at this moment I could not have been more than two feet from General Mahone, who was standing a short distance from and a little distance in advance of the line of our formation, and who was then awaiting the movements of the Georgia Brigade, emerging from the covered way; and so was Captain Thomas P. Pollard, of Company B, of the 12th Virginia, when in his statement made in 1880, referring to the time at which the brigade fixed bayonets and lay down to await orders, he said: At that time, if my memory serves me right, I saw General Mahone in our immediate rear and close enough to give any command that might have been necessary; and so was Lieutenant John E. Laughton, Jr., of Company D, 12th Virginia, who comhanded a company of the battalion of sharp-shooters on the extreme right of th
of the crater; talk with the men of Ransom's North Carolina Brigade, which occupied the lines next to Elliott's Brigade on the north of the crater; talk with Major David N. Walker, of your city, who commanded a battery on the south of the crater; talk with Captain W. Gordon McCabe, who as Adjutant of Pegram's Battalion of Light Artillery, posted immediately west of the crater, witnessed the charge of the Virginia Brigade; talk with Dr. Joseph W. Eggleston, of your city, who, as a member of Lamkin's Mortar Battery, fired many a shell into the Federal lines during the engagement; talk with many others of the surviving participants in the battle, and they will satisfy you that, so far from the success of the Confederate arms at the crater being the work of the Virginia Brigade alone, strictly speaking, it was not the sole work of the three brigades commanded by General Mahone, but the result of fighting wherein other infantry took part and the artillery was a potential factor. But to
W. A. S. Taylor (search for this): chapter 1.21
clear beyond controversy that, so far from it being true, as charged, that General Mahone remained in the covered way from the time General Weisiger moved forward with his brigade to the time when, after having been wounded, he met and talked with him (Mahone) on his way from the field, it is, on the contrary, true, that within a few minutes after General Weisiger and his men reached the breastworks General Mahone was there with them and among them. Captain Taylor's statement. Captain W. A. S. Taylor, the adjutant of 61st Virginia Regiment, in his statement, said: Arriving at the works, the command delivered its fire and finished the work assigned it with the bayonet. In a very few minutes thereafter General Mahone was at that portion of the works occupied by the 61st Virginia, and I heard him remark, That the work is not over, and that we must retake the balance of the line. Mr. T. H. Hines, of Company B, 16th Virginia Regiment, in his statement, said: Seeing a co
Henry A. Wise (search for this): chapter 1.21
wounded, by his own account, over 3,000, and captured 1,101 prisouers, embracing eighty-seven officers, seventeen stands of colors, two guerdons, and 1,916 stands of small arms, deeds which, to use the language of the order, entitle their banner to the inscription, The Crater, Petersburg, July 30, 1864. To whom credit is due. Talk with the men of Elliott's Brigade, which, under the gallant Colonel F. W. McMaster, did no small amount of fighting on this famous day; talk with the men of Wise's Brigade, which held the Confederate lines next on the south of the crater; talk with the men of Ransom's North Carolina Brigade, which occupied the lines next to Elliott's Brigade on the north of the crater; talk with Major David N. Walker, of your city, who commanded a battery on the south of the crater; talk with Captain W. Gordon McCabe, who as Adjutant of Pegram's Battalion of Light Artillery, posted immediately west of the crater, witnessed the charge of the Virginia Brigade; talk wit
Robert Edward Lee (search for this): chapter 1.21
it is manifest that both General A. P. Hill, to whose corps the division commanded by General Mahone belonged, and General R. E. Lee were laboring under a mistake, when, on the day of the battle, in their official reports, they referred to the retand staff, and 855 enlisted men. Upward of 500 of the enemy's dead are lying unburied in the trenches. His loss slight. R. E. Lee. Memorable service. If it was General Weisiger, and not General Mahone, whose service on the 30th of July, 1864ommunication to General Lee, published at page 1156, of serial 88 of the War Records. Richmond, August 2, 1864. (General R. E. Lee, Petersburg. Va.: Have ordered the promotion of General Mahone to date from the day of his memorable service, 30ds there is but one inference to be drawn, and that is, that, whatever the actual facts were, General A. P. Hill, General Robert E. Lee, and President Davis, who may properly be assumed to have voiced the current sentiment of the army and people of
Drury A. Hinton (search for this): chapter 1.21
the statements of General Weisiger and Judge Drury A. Hinton, his aide-de-camp, who was with Generarks I was wounded, and left the field with Captain Hinton, my aid. In coming out I found Mahone at tthe statements of General Weisiger and Judge Drury A. Hinton, his aide-de-camp, who was with Genera is herewith concluded from last Sunday: Judge Hinton's view. Let us now see what Judge HintonJudge Hinton said in an account of the battle given by him in 1892. The statement of this staff officer of Gene started on its charge; (2d) that Weisiger and Hinton on their return from the breastworks met Mahonbor that he stood when, upon being informed by Hinton that Weisiger was ready to charge, he said: Terigade made its charge. The statement of Judge Hinton is as follows: At the end of the cove had been already, seen by Girardey, Weisiger, Hinton and numbers of men in the brigade—he cried outardey) to exercise when he sent to Weisiger by Hinton the message, Tell Colonel Weisiger to wait for
Bushrod Johnson (search for this): chapter 1.21
s not, but was held by several hundred of the enemy for at least four hours longer, that is to say, until 1 o'clock P. M., when the final assault of the day, that made by the Alabama Brigade of Mahone's Division, supported by troops from General Bushrod Johnson's Division, resulted in its capture, and in the capture of the several hundred men then occupying it. This assault was made under the direction of General Mahone, after at least one unsuccessful assault by the Georgia Brigade, the assaul whether he can be detached. Jefferson Davis. If the work of the Virginia Brigade under General Weisiger was a complete triumph, and General Mahone's work was as nothing, as one would suppose from a perusual of The Times' editorial, General Bushrod Johnson, whose lines had been broken, was under a false impression as to the true state of things, when in his official report made August 20, 1864, and published at page 787, of serial 80 of the War Record, he said: To the able commander
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