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Pikesville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
tensively reproduced in other newspapers. They are unique and nothing to compare with them has ever appeared. Doubtless they will be published in a volume. Major Goldsborough was the author of The Maryland Line in the Confederate Army, published in 1869. About 1896 he partially rewrote this volume, but being unable to quite complete it, it was with other help finished and published. While thus engaged, he was entertained as a guest at the Maryland Line Confederate Soldiers' Home, Pikesville, Md., the superintendent being Sergeant Wm. H. Pope, of his company, A, First Maryland Regiment. Still being desirous to do full justice to the Maryland Confederates, he was at his death engaged in gathering materials for a third volume, which it is probable will ultimately appear. With this end in view he spent much of last summer with his brother, Charles E. Goldsborough at Hunterstown, Pa., near Gettysburg and the battlefield. No one but Major Goldsborough has ever attempted to chronic
Baltimore City (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
a., in 1845. His son, William Worthington, was born at Graceham, Frederick county, Md., October 6, 1831; was educated at Hanover, Pa., and learned the trade of a printer, afterward becoming foreman of the Pittsburg Dispatch, but he went to Baltimore about 1850 and found employment on newspapers until May, 1861. As a compositor and proof-reader he atttained great proficiency. In politics he was always an old school Democrat. In 1857 he joined Captain D. E. Woodburn's company in the Baltimore City Guard Battalion, one of the best known military commands in the United States, and after four years drilling and instruction he was well fitted for the duties of a soldier and an officer in field service. His company, with others, having been sent to Harper's Ferry, Va., to aid in subduing John Brown's murderous raid, in October, 1859, they closed upon the United States Marines who battered down the door of Brown's Fort and rushed in, Goldsborough and another of his company were the fir
Broad Street (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 1.28
ffered agony, the shock from which it is believed shattered his system beyond repair. About five years ago his thigh bone was shattered from being struck down by a bicycle, after which he never walked without crutches. While in the hospital in Philadelphia he met and married his wife, who faithfully nursed him to the end. He hated to die, and fought death with his tremendous will-power. Once he said to his wife: Should the end come, don't bury me among the—Yankees here; send my body to Broad-street station, and ship it to Winfield Peters, Baltimore. His command was obeyed. Major Goldsborough's remains reached Baltimore Friday, December 27th, and the funeral took place Saturday afternoon. The cortege formed at the main entrance to Loudoun Park Cemetery and moved to the Confederate plot. In front was a drum-and-fife corps, followed by a volunteer battalion from the Fifth regiment infantry, M. N. G., under Captain N. Lee Goldsborough. Then came the honorary pall-bearers and Rev.
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 1.28
d intermediate is the monument to the lamented Captain Wm. H. Murray and his men, and surrounding all these are five hundred men and officers of the invincible armies of the glorious Confederacy. Ah! realm of tombs! but let her bear, This blazon to the last of times: No nation rose so white and fair, Or fell so pure of crimes. From early manhood the career of Major Goldsborough was replete with the stress and storm of arms. As a lad he ran away from home to enlist for the war against Mexico, but was overtaken in Baltimore and taken back home. During the war between the States his life was full of adventures, perils, battles, wounds and prison hardships. By nature he was, he admitted, a man who loved fighting, and was always in the thick of battle. Among the many brave, daring and skillful line officers of the Maryland line in the Confederate army, Major Goldsborough stood in the forefront, surpassed by none, if indeed he was wholly equalled. Descended from a distinguished
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
isoners of war, who were placed within range of the Confederate batteries at Charleston, S. C., during the fierce Federal assault on that city; suffering many hardships and privations, having often killed and eaten cats and other animals! What could have been more cowardly and despicable than such treatment to such heroes! Colonel Herbert's exchange was effected, but Major Goldsborough remained a prisoner until the war was over. Soon after the war Major Goldsborough established the Winchester, Va., Times, which he afterward sold and went to Philadelphia to reside. Major Goldsborough was with the Philadelphia Record from 1870 to 1890. In 1890 he migrated to the far Northwest, settling at Tacoma in Washington State. Here he came in contact with what was regarded as the roughest gang of printers on the Pacific Coast. Prior to his arrival no one had dared to run counter to them; but as foreman of the Tacoma Daily Globe he cleared out the gang, unionized the office and made it o
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
ty of the Confederate States Army and Navy in Maryland, to the writer and to Sergeant Richard T. Knoty of the Confederate States Army and Navy in Maryland under Captain George W. Booth, the James R. Hf them lies Colonel Harry Gilmor, the dashing Maryland partisan, while fifty yards away lies brave Gave, daring and skillful line officers of the Maryland line in the Confederate army, Major Goldsborod. Descended from a distinguished lineage in Maryland, he inherited all the best faculties that typify the true Maryland soldier, added to a fine, cultivated intellect, a charming, magnetic personalid officers, with much active service, the new Maryland battalion soon became a magnificent fighting nts and engagements, in which Marylanders and Maryland troops were conspicuous. Those war articles,engaged, he was entertained as a guest at the Maryland Line Confederate Soldiers' Home, Pikesville, nected with the Maryland Confederates. The Maryland Line, C. S. A., was created by Act of the Con[2 more...]
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
h, of the famous Maryland line, C. S. A. Military funeral in Baltimore—sketch of his eventful life and distinguished services—soldier, Jstmas afternoon last the startling information was telegraphed to Baltimore of the unexpected death in Philadelphia of Major William Worthingto his widow, Mrs. Louise Goldsborough, to forward the remains to Baltimore, to be buried with military honors in the Confederate burial plot my body to Broad-street station, and ship it to Winfield Peters, Baltimore. His command was obeyed. Major Goldsborough's remains reached Baltimore Friday, December 27th, and the funeral took place Saturday afternoon. The cortege formed at the main entrance to Loudoun Park Cemem home to enlist for the war against Mexico, but was overtaken in Baltimore and taken back home. During the war between the States his life erward becoming foreman of the Pittsburg Dispatch, but he went to Baltimore about 1850 and found employment on newspapers until May, 1861. A
Frederick (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
alert and ripe for perilous service, he commanded the admiration and confidence of all within reach of his voice or example. His superior officers were impressed with his exceptional worth, and he received less promotion than he deserved; but his fame will descend through generations following those who were his comrades in arms. The genealogy of the Goldsboroughs appears in Old Kent. The grandfather of Major Goldsborough was a native of Dorchester county, Maryland. He removed to Frederick county in 8000, where the father of Major Goldsborough, Leander W. Goldsborough, was born and spent part of his life, removing to Hanover, Pa., in 1845. His son, William Worthington, was born at Graceham, Frederick county, Md., October 6, 1831; was educated at Hanover, Pa., and learned the trade of a printer, afterward becoming foreman of the Pittsburg Dispatch, but he went to Baltimore about 1850 and found employment on newspapers until May, 1861. As a compositor and proof-reader he atttain
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
timore of the unexpected death in Philadelphia of Major William Worthington Goldsborough, to Captain George W. Booth, acting President of the Society of the Confederate States Army and Navy in Maryland, to the writer and to Sergeant Richard T. Knox, a famous soldier, who accompanied the Major when reconnoitering. A telegram was same, D. D., chaplain. The hearse and carriages came next, with the active pall-bearers beside the hearse, then followed delegations from the Society of the Confederate States Army and Navy in Maryland under Captain George W. Booth, the James R. Herbert Camp, U. C. V., survivors of the Baltimore City Guard battalion and the Union d school Democrat. In 1857 he joined Captain D. E. Woodburn's company in the Baltimore City Guard Battalion, one of the best known military commands in the United States, and after four years drilling and instruction he was well fitted for the duties of a soldier and an officer in field service. His company, with others, havin
Graceham (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
romotion than he deserved; but his fame will descend through generations following those who were his comrades in arms. The genealogy of the Goldsboroughs appears in Old Kent. The grandfather of Major Goldsborough was a native of Dorchester county, Maryland. He removed to Frederick county in 8000, where the father of Major Goldsborough, Leander W. Goldsborough, was born and spent part of his life, removing to Hanover, Pa., in 1845. His son, William Worthington, was born at Graceham, Frederick county, Md., October 6, 1831; was educated at Hanover, Pa., and learned the trade of a printer, afterward becoming foreman of the Pittsburg Dispatch, but he went to Baltimore about 1850 and found employment on newspapers until May, 1861. As a compositor and proof-reader he atttained great proficiency. In politics he was always an old school Democrat. In 1857 he joined Captain D. E. Woodburn's company in the Baltimore City Guard Battalion, one of the best known military commands in the
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