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Catonsville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
he President, and their armory on West Pratt street was looted. There was a great rush for arms, and a number of muskets belonging to the State were seized. The works of the Messrs. Winans were engaged in making pikes, in casting balls for muskets and cannon and the steam gun which Mr. Winans had invented. A centrifugal steam gun invented by Mr. Dickinson was purchased by the city to be used in the public defense. A party of young men took some field pieces from a military school at Catonsville and brought them to town, but the principal of the school, a clergyman and a strong Union man, had spiked them. The militia were called out, and 15,000 citizens were enrolled and put under the command of Colonel Isaac R. Trimble. All day long companies of the State militia were arriving from the counties. The first to come was a company of riflemen from Frederick, under command of Captain Bradley T. Johnson. Between 300 and 400 colored men offered their services to the Mayor. Early
Camden Station (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
, and the volunteers went down Howard street to Camden Station. Not finding a train there, they continued on tt, along Pratt to Howard street, and thence to Camden Station. Along this route was the scene of the riot. ril. Six cars, drawn rapidly by horses, reached Camden Station, the first carload being received with jeers anes and hoots and yells of defiance. March to Camden Station. There were now at President Street Station resident street and began their famous march to Camden Station. As they marched up President street the commof the city, Mr. George M. Gill, rode rapidly to Camden Station in a carriage. It was thought that the disturb the soldiers, under police protection, reached Camden Station without further damage. In the battle four sol. The embarkation of the troops in the cars in Camden Station was attended by an angry demonstration, and onlrce under his command. When the troops reached Camden Station 130 were missing. Robert W. Davis killed.
Broadway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
Lowell on the morning of the 16th of April. Four companies were from that city, four were added from other cities, and when the regiment reached Boston, about midday, a company from that city was added, bringing up the strength of the regiment to about 700 men. They were drawn up before the Governor of Massachusetts, who addressed them, and then they left for the South, their whole journey until they had left Philadelphia behind being an ovation. On the 18th the regiment marched down Broadway, New York, from the railroad station to the upper part of the city to the Jersey City ferry. The march was like a holiday parade, and the troops were cheered by thousands of citizens who filled the sidewalks. In passing through New Jersey towns and through Philadelphia there was the same enthusiasm. At or near Philadelphia an unarmed and ununiformed Pennsylvania regiment was added to the force, bringing the total number of the troops up to about 1,700 men. After leaving Philadelphia the cheer
Mount Clare (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
meet them. The regulars marched to Fort McHenry, and the volunteers went down Howard street to Camden Station. Not finding a train there, they continued on to Mount Clare, where a train was made up to carry them to Washington. Several thousand people, all laboring under intense excitement, met the troops at Bolton Station and followed them to Mount Clare. All the way there was a riotous demonstration. Marshal Kane was there with 120 policemen, and while he succeeded in preventing any serious breaches of the peace, he could not stop the mouths of the people, who hissed, jerred and ridiculed the volunteers. The march through the city was rapid, and the tted on either flank by files of policemen. The mob sang Dixie, cheered for Jeff. Davis and the Confederacy, and while the troops were getting into the cars at Mount Clare, there was pandemonium, and two bricks were hurled at them. But the train pulled out at 4 o'clock without any really serious trouble. Opposing sentiment.
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
regiment to about 700 men. They were drawn up before the Governor of Massachusetts, who addressed them, and then they left for the South, their whole journey until they had left Philadelphia behind being an ovation. On the 18th the regiment marched down Broadway, New York, from the railroad station to the upper part of the city to the Jersey City ferry. The march was like a holiday parade, and the troops were cheered by thousands of citizens who filled the sidewalks. In passing through New Jersey towns and through Philadelphia there was the same enthusiasm. At or near Philadelphia an unarmed and ununiformed Pennsylvania regiment was added to the force, bringing the total number of the troops up to about 1,700 men. After leaving Philadelphia the cheering ceased and the atmosphere changed. It was no longer a holiday trip, for there was every evidence that the troops were approaching the enemy's country. Soon after leaving Philadelphia the commander of the regiment received an inti
Camden, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
had been carried out and the troops had marched through in a body the trouble might not have occurred. At that time the only railroad from Baltimore to Washington was the Baltimore and Ohio. Trains coming from the East for Washington were hauled by horses, one car at a time, from President Street Station up to Pratt, along Pratt to Howard street, and thence to Camden Station. Along this route was the scene of the riot. Instead of disembarking at President street and marching in a body to Camden, the regular course was attempted, and this gave the mob the opportunity to attack the troops in detail. The train bringing the soldiers consisted of thirty-five cars. It arrived at President Street Station about 11 o'clock on the morning of Friday, 19th of April. Six cars, drawn rapidly by horses, reached Camden Station, the first carload being received with jeers and hisses, but the last car was thrown from the track and delayed, the windows broken with paving stones, which had also stru
Cockeysville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
been cut off, but a messenger arrived in the morning, saying that a Northern army had reached Cockeysville. At five minutes before eleven the bell of the town clock sounded the call to arms. The cone and Ohio Railroad Company, as follows: Three thousand Northern troops are reported to be at Cockeysville. Intense excitement prevails. Churches have been dismissed and the people are arming in mawere to go to Perryville, and thence as Major-General Patterson should direct. The Camp at Cockeysville. The troops at Cockeysville, numbering 2,400, about half of them unarmed, did not receive Cockeysville, numbering 2,400, about half of them unarmed, did not receive their orders to return to Pennsylvania for several days. During the interval they were in sad plight, without food and proper camp equipment. There was some sickness, due to want of food, and Marshathe alarm about the invasion had been quieted by the Mayor many citizens of Baltimore went to Cockeysville to visit the camp. The following incident is from The Sun of April 22: In the afternoon Mr.
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
icts of modern times. But the coincidence of dates is the only similarity between the two events. The minute men of Massachusetts who attacked the British soldiers April 19, 1775, had long looked forward to the event, and were prepared and armed fam Brown, Mayor of Baltimore, who risked his life to protect the Massachusetts troops, telegraphed to the Governor of Massachusetts on April 20: Our people viewed the passage of armed troops of another State through the streets as an invasion of our city was added, bringing up the strength of the regiment to about 700 men. They were drawn up before the Governor of Massachusetts, who addressed them, and then they left for the South, their whole journey until they had left Philadelphia behind beoln and the North. The unarmed Pennsylvanians and the regimental band remained in the railroad station, but the four Massachusetts companies formed on President street and began their famous march to Camden Station. As they marched up President st
York, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
he President and exhibited to him Mr. Garrett's dispatch, which gave the President great surprise. The President summoned the Secretary of War and General Scott, and urged the recall of the troops, saving he had no idea they would be there. Lest there should be the slightest suspicion of bad faith on his part in summoning the Mayor to Washington and allowing the troops to march on the city during his absence, he desired that the troops should, if it were practicable, be sent back at once to York or Harrisburg. General Scott adopted the President's view, and an order was prepared by the Lieutenant-General to that effect and forwarded to Major Belger, who accompanied the Mayor and his colleagues back to Baltimore. The troops were ordered back to Harrisburg, thence to Philadelphia. From that city they were to go to Perryville, and thence as Major-General Patterson should direct. The Camp at Cockeysville. The troops at Cockeysville, numbering 2,400, about half of them unarmed, d
Perryville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.29
ared by the Lieutenant-General to that effect and forwarded to Major Belger, who accompanied the Mayor and his colleagues back to Baltimore. The troops were ordered back to Harrisburg, thence to Philadelphia. From that city they were to go to Perryville, and thence as Major-General Patterson should direct. The Camp at Cockeysville. The troops at Cockeysville, numbering 2,400, about half of them unarmed, did not receive their orders to return to Pennsylvania for several days. During the cked the city and killed all the inhabitants. Several of the soldiers asked Mr. Ritchie for his badge, but he declined to give it. The next troops to reach Maryland were the Eighth Massachusetts, under General B. F. Butler. They went from Perryville to Annapolis on the 21st and landed at the Naval Academy, although Governor Hicks advised the General against it, telegraphed to the same effect to the Secretary of War and addressed a letter to the President asking him to order elsewhere the t
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