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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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San Antonio (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.31
For two years he was at Carmago, on the Mexican side of the Rio Grande. Having attained his promotion as surgeon at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., he was ordered to duty with the troops which went as advance guard across the plains before the great emigration of 1849, and was en route to, and on duty at, Fort Laramie, Ore., now Wyoming Territory, until August, 1851. In January, 1852, he was again ordered to Texas, under Division Commander General Persifer F. Smith; remaining a few months in San Antonio; thence to duty at Brownsville 'till November, 1854; then to Fort Columbus, Governor's Island, New York harbor, until July, 1855, and thence to the United States Military Academy at West Point, where he remained 'till April, 1860; subsequent to which, 'till his resignation, he was the medical purveyor at New Orleans, La. Though a great lover of his country and his State, he was not a politician, and was greatly distressed in mind as to where his duty called, at the same time and in lik
Fort Coffee (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.31
Fort Brown, or Brownsville. General Stewart Van Vliet, United States army, married the only other daughter (and child) of Major Brown. Dr. Moore was educated in Charleston, S. C.; graduated in medicine in 1834; became assistant surgeon in the United States army, March 14, 1835; surgeon (rank of major), April 30, 1849, and resigned February 25, 1861. From the date of his appointment as assistant surgeon he was on active duty at Fort Leavenworth, Fort Des Moines, Fort Gibson, Mo., Fort Coffee, Kan., and numerous forts in Florida, until in 1843 he was stationed at camp Barrancas, Pensacola harbor, where he became acquainted with his future wife, her father being in command of a detail of the Seventh Regiment of United States Infantry, occupying the harbor defences—Forts Pickens and McRae. In the August after his marriage he accompanied his command to Aransas and Corpus Christi, on the Texas boundary, the Neuces river, preparatory to the movement to the Rio Grande, and commencemen
Des Moines River (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.31
ce been known, in honor of him, as Fort Brown, or Brownsville. General Stewart Van Vliet, United States army, married the only other daughter (and child) of Major Brown. Dr. Moore was educated in Charleston, S. C.; graduated in medicine in 1834; became assistant surgeon in the United States army, March 14, 1835; surgeon (rank of major), April 30, 1849, and resigned February 25, 1861. From the date of his appointment as assistant surgeon he was on active duty at Fort Leavenworth, Fort Des Moines, Fort Gibson, Mo., Fort Coffee, Kan., and numerous forts in Florida, until in 1843 he was stationed at camp Barrancas, Pensacola harbor, where he became acquainted with his future wife, her father being in command of a detail of the Seventh Regiment of United States Infantry, occupying the harbor defences—Forts Pickens and McRae. In the August after his marriage he accompanied his command to Aransas and Corpus Christi, on the Texas boundary, the Neuces river, preparatory to the movement t
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.31
of the Confederate States. A biographical sketch. Record of his services in the U. S. And Confederate States armies. [By Samuel E. Lewis, M. D., Washington, D. C., late Assistant Surgeon, Confederate States Army; First Vice-President of the Association of Medical Officers of the Army and Navy of the Confederate States.] After the Memphis reunion, General Marcus J. Wright, of the War Records Office, Washington, D. C., was requested to furnish a biographical sketch of the late Surgeon-General of the Confederate States, Samuel Preston Moore, M. D., and he initiated correspondence to that end; but being very much occupied with other literary workeans, La.; the Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. II, page 125; Vol. XVII, page 12; Vol. XX, page 109; the Medical and Surgical Journal of the Con- federate States; the Rise and fall of the Confederate States Government, Vol. I, page 310; the Richmond Dispatch, June 1, 1889; the Surgeon-General's office, Washington, D. C.
Fort Laramie (Wyoming, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.31
arriage he accompanied his command to Aransas and Corpus Christi, on the Texas boundary, the Neuces river, preparatory to the movement to the Rio Grande, and commencement of the Mexican war. For two years he was at Carmago, on the Mexican side of the Rio Grande. Having attained his promotion as surgeon at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., he was ordered to duty with the troops which went as advance guard across the plains before the great emigration of 1849, and was en route to, and on duty at, Fort Laramie, Ore., now Wyoming Territory, until August, 1851. In January, 1852, he was again ordered to Texas, under Division Commander General Persifer F. Smith; remaining a few months in San Antonio; thence to duty at Brownsville 'till November, 1854; then to Fort Columbus, Governor's Island, New York harbor, until July, 1855, and thence to the United States Military Academy at West Point, where he remained 'till April, 1860; subsequent to which, 'till his resignation, he was the medical purveyor
Fort Gibson (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.31
in honor of him, as Fort Brown, or Brownsville. General Stewart Van Vliet, United States army, married the only other daughter (and child) of Major Brown. Dr. Moore was educated in Charleston, S. C.; graduated in medicine in 1834; became assistant surgeon in the United States army, March 14, 1835; surgeon (rank of major), April 30, 1849, and resigned February 25, 1861. From the date of his appointment as assistant surgeon he was on active duty at Fort Leavenworth, Fort Des Moines, Fort Gibson, Mo., Fort Coffee, Kan., and numerous forts in Florida, until in 1843 he was stationed at camp Barrancas, Pensacola harbor, where he became acquainted with his future wife, her father being in command of a detail of the Seventh Regiment of United States Infantry, occupying the harbor defences—Forts Pickens and McRae. In the August after his marriage he accompanied his command to Aransas and Corpus Christi, on the Texas boundary, the Neuces river, preparatory to the movement to the Rio Grand
Nueces (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.31
duty at Fort Leavenworth, Fort Des Moines, Fort Gibson, Mo., Fort Coffee, Kan., and numerous forts in Florida, until in 1843 he was stationed at camp Barrancas, Pensacola harbor, where he became acquainted with his future wife, her father being in command of a detail of the Seventh Regiment of United States Infantry, occupying the harbor defences—Forts Pickens and McRae. In the August after his marriage he accompanied his command to Aransas and Corpus Christi, on the Texas boundary, the Neuces river, preparatory to the movement to the Rio Grande, and commencement of the Mexican war. For two years he was at Carmago, on the Mexican side of the Rio Grande. Having attained his promotion as surgeon at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., he was ordered to duty with the troops which went as advance guard across the plains before the great emigration of 1849, and was en route to, and on duty at, Fort Laramie, Ore., now Wyoming Territory, until August, 1851. In January, 1852, he was again ordered to
Fort McRae (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.31
major), April 30, 1849, and resigned February 25, 1861. From the date of his appointment as assistant surgeon he was on active duty at Fort Leavenworth, Fort Des Moines, Fort Gibson, Mo., Fort Coffee, Kan., and numerous forts in Florida, until in 1843 he was stationed at camp Barrancas, Pensacola harbor, where he became acquainted with his future wife, her father being in command of a detail of the Seventh Regiment of United States Infantry, occupying the harbor defences—Forts Pickens and McRae. In the August after his marriage he accompanied his command to Aransas and Corpus Christi, on the Texas boundary, the Neuces river, preparatory to the movement to the Rio Grande, and commencement of the Mexican war. For two years he was at Carmago, on the Mexican side of the Rio Grande. Having attained his promotion as surgeon at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., he was ordered to duty with the troops which went as advance guard across the plains before the great emigration of 1849, and was en r
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.31
ly engaged in the practice of his profession, but giving the benefit of his extensive knowledge and experience to educational and other institutions, having the welfare of the community in view. He was a member of the R. E. Lee Camp of Confederate Veterans, of Richmond; of the Executive Board of the Virginia Agricultural Society, and of the Richmond School Board; was chosen president of the Association of Medical and Surgical Officers of the Army and Navy of the Confederate States, at Atlanta, Ga., May 25, 1874, and was elected one of the vice-presidents of the Section of Military and Naval Surgery in the ninth International Congress, 1887. He died at his residence, No. 202 West Grace street, Richmond, Va., May 31, 1889, and was buried in Hollywood cemetery. In person he was above medium stature well formed, erect, and of soldierly bearing; regular, handsome features, not austere, but subdued by thought and studious habits. With acquaintances he was genial, having a pleasant
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.31
place of safety in the district of the city afterwards burned, so that it is very difficult to obtain even a meagre account of his life prior to that time. Birth and education. Samuel Preston Moore, physician and surgeon, was born in Charleston, S. C.,——, 813; the son of Stephen West and Eleanor Screven (Gilbert) Moore, and grandson of Samuel Preston and Susanna (Pearson) Moore, and was the lineal descendant of Dr. Mordecai Moore, who accompanied, as his physician, Lord Baltimore when hexas side of the Rio Grande, which has since been known, in honor of him, as Fort Brown, or Brownsville. General Stewart Van Vliet, United States army, married the only other daughter (and child) of Major Brown. Dr. Moore was educated in Charleston, S. C.; graduated in medicine in 1834; became assistant surgeon in the United States army, March 14, 1835; surgeon (rank of major), April 30, 1849, and resigned February 25, 1861. From the date of his appointment as assistant surgeon he was on ac
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