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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.32
ers who make it. Events in Virginia, which broke every hope of our success by war, imposed on its general the duty of sparing the blood of the gallant army, and saving our country from further devastation and our people from ruin. (Signed) J. E. Johnston. P. S.—Unattached officers of army and navy, within the country of the Chattahooche, may also accept the terms of the convention. Special field order, no. 15. headquarters military division of Mississippi, in the field, Raleigh, N. C. April 27, 1865., The general commanding commands a further suspension of hostilities, and a final agreement with General Johnston, which terminates the war as to the army under his command and the country east of the Chattahooche. Copies of the terms of the convention will be furnished Major-Generals Schofield, Gilmore and Wilson, who are especially charged with the executiou of its details in North Carolina, the Department of the South, and at Macon and Western Georgia. Captain Jas
Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.32
g newspaper extra, published by the Greensville (S. C.) Southern Enterprise, on May 5, 1865, announcing the cessation of armed hostilities east of the Chattahoochee, is in possession of a citizen of Charlotte. The extra covers only one side of a small sheet about 6x14 inches. The head is only one column wide. The story is as follows: The Southern Enterprise. Extra. Greenville, S. C., Friday, May 5, 1865. highly important. Cessation of Armed Hostilities East of the Chattahoochee River. Johnston and Sherman's orders. We have been furnished with a copy of the following important and interesting orders, which we give to the public in this shape. We hope soon to resume the regular issues of our paper. All are aware of the cause of the present suspension. The raiders, however, have done our establishment no very great or serious injury, and if no further molestation occur, we can give them our usual weekly greeting. Greensboroa, April 29, 1865. Commanding O
Chester, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.32
hnston and Sherman's orders. We have been furnished with a copy of the following important and interesting orders, which we give to the public in this shape. We hope soon to resume the regular issues of our paper. All are aware of the cause of the present suspension. The raiders, however, have done our establishment no very great or serious injury, and if no further molestation occur, we can give them our usual weekly greeting. Greensboroa, April 29, 1865. Commanding Officer of Chester, S. C. General Johnston desires you to make public the following orders: General orders no. 18.— headquarters army of Tennessee, near Greensboroa, N. C. April 27, 1865., By the terms of the military convention, made on the 26th, by Major-General W. T. Sherman, United States Army, the officers and men of this army bind themselves not to take up arms against the United States, until properly relieved from their obligations, and shall receive guarantees from the United States against m
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.32
rder, no. 15. headquarters military division of Mississippi, in the field, Raleigh, N. C. April 27, 1865., The general commanding commands a further suspension of hostilities, and a final agreement with General Johnston, which terminates the war as to the army under his command and the country east of the Chattahooche. Copies of the terms of the convention will be furnished Major-Generals Schofield, Gilmore and Wilson, who are especially charged with the executiou of its details in North Carolina, the Department of the South, and at Macon and Western Georgia. Captain Jasper Myer, United States army, is hereby designated to receive the arms at Greensboro, N. C., and any commanding officer of the East may receive arms of any detachments, and see that they are properly stored and accounted for. General Schofield will procure at once necessary blanks and supply the other army commanders, that uniformity may prevail, and great care must be taken that the terms and stipulations on our
Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.32
A memory of May 5, 1865. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, August 19, 1901.] Orders published in a paper announcing cessation of hostilities. contributed by D. H. Littlejohn. A very interesting newspaper extra, published by the Greensville (S. C.) Southern Enterprise, on May 5, 1865, announcing the cessation of armed hostilities east of the Chattahoochee, is in possession of a citizen of Charlotte. The extra covers only one side of a small sheet about 6x14 inches. The head is only one column wide. The story is as follows: The Southern Enterprise. Extra. Greenville, S. C., Friday, May 5, 1865. highly important. Cessation of Armed Hostilities East of the Chattahoochee River. Johnston and Sherman's orders. We have been furnished with a copy of the following important and interesting orders, which we give to the public in this shape. We hope soon to resume the regular issues of our paper. All are aware of the cause of the present suspension. The r
Greenville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.32
blished in a paper announcing cessation of hostilities. contributed by D. H. Littlejohn. A very interesting newspaper extra, published by the Greensville (S. C.) Southern Enterprise, on May 5, 1865, announcing the cessation of armed hostilities east of the Chattahoochee, is in possession of a citizen of Charlotte. The extra covers only one side of a small sheet about 6x14 inches. The head is only one column wide. The story is as follows: The Southern Enterprise. Extra. Greenville, S. C., Friday, May 5, 1865. highly important. Cessation of Armed Hostilities East of the Chattahoochee River. Johnston and Sherman's orders. We have been furnished with a copy of the following important and interesting orders, which we give to the public in this shape. We hope soon to resume the regular issues of our paper. All are aware of the cause of the present suspension. The raiders, however, have done our establishment no very great or serious injury, and if no furthe
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.32
ention, made on the 26th, by Major-General W. T. Sherman, United States Army, the officers and men of this army bind themselves not to take up arms against the United States, until properly relieved from their obligations, and shall receive guarantees from the United States against molestation by the United States authorities, so lUnited States against molestation by the United States authorities, so long as they observe that obligation and the law is enforced where they reside. For these objects muster rolls will be made immediately, and after the distribution of the necessary papers the troops will march under their officers to their respective States, and then be disbanded, all retaining personal property. The objects oUnited States authorities, so long as they observe that obligation and the law is enforced where they reside. For these objects muster rolls will be made immediately, and after the distribution of the necessary papers the troops will march under their officers to their respective States, and then be disbanded, all retaining personal property. The objects of this convention is pacification to the extent of the authority of the commanders who make it. Events in Virginia, which broke every hope of our success by war, imposed on its general the duty of sparing the blood of the gallant army, and saving our country from further devastation and our people from ruin. (Signed) J. E. J
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.32
A memory of May 5, 1865. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, August 19, 1901.] Orders published in a paper announcing cessation of hostilities. contributed by D. H. Littlejohn. A very interesting newspaper extra, published by the Greensville (S. C.) Southern Enterprise, on May 5, 1865, announcing the cessation of armed hostilities east of the Chattahoochee, is in possession of a citizen of Charlotte. The extra covers only one side of a small sheet about 6x14 inches. The head is only one column wide. The story is as follows: The Southern Enterprise. Extra. Greenville, S. C., Friday, May 5, 1865. highly important. Cessation of Armed Hostilities East of the Chattahoochee River. Johnston and Sherman's orders. We have been furnished with a copy of the following important and interesting orders, which we give to the public in this shape. We hope soon to resume the regular issues of our paper. All are aware of the cause of the present suspension. The r
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.32
n the field, Raleigh, N. C. April 27, 1865., The general commanding commands a further suspension of hostilities, and a final agreement with General Johnston, which terminates the war as to the army under his command and the country east of the Chattahooche. Copies of the terms of the convention will be furnished Major-Generals Schofield, Gilmore and Wilson, who are especially charged with the executiou of its details in North Carolina, the Department of the South, and at Macon and Western Georgia. Captain Jasper Myer, United States army, is hereby designated to receive the arms at Greensboro, N. C., and any commanding officer of the East may receive arms of any detachments, and see that they are properly stored and accounted for. General Schofield will procure at once necessary blanks and supply the other army commanders, that uniformity may prevail, and great care must be taken that the terms and stipulations on our part be fulfilled with the most scrupulous fidelity, whilst th
Greensboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.32
hostilities, and a final agreement with General Johnston, which terminates the war as to the army under his command and the country east of the Chattahooche. Copies of the terms of the convention will be furnished Major-Generals Schofield, Gilmore and Wilson, who are especially charged with the executiou of its details in North Carolina, the Department of the South, and at Macon and Western Georgia. Captain Jasper Myer, United States army, is hereby designated to receive the arms at Greensboro, N. C., and any commanding officer of the East may receive arms of any detachments, and see that they are properly stored and accounted for. General Schofield will procure at once necessary blanks and supply the other army commanders, that uniformity may prevail, and great care must be taken that the terms and stipulations on our part be fulfilled with the most scrupulous fidelity, whilst those imposed on the hitherto enemies be received in a spirit becoming a brave and generous army. Army
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