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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.42
Rest at Mt. Jackson. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, April 29, 1901.] Confederate dead in beautiful Shenandoah Cemetery. They appeal for assistance. Daughters of the Confederacy would erect a Monument over these fallen Heroes—Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama troops sleep there. To the Editor of the Dispatch. The Shenandoah river, in the Valley of Virginia—the garden spot of Virginia—was called by the Indians Minneha-ha, or, laughing waters. Situated on the bank of this beautiful stream is the town of Mount Jackson. This little town had its numerous experiences during the war between the States, from 1861-‘65. It had its joys and sorrows. Around it clusters many sad recollections and the memory of many daring and chivalrous deeds which will never be forgotten by those who survive. The people in the neighborhood were in the Confederacy heart and soul. The Confederate army established a large hospital here for the Southern s
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.42
od were in the Confederacy heart and soul. The Confederate army established a large hospital here for the Southern soldiers. Many, many, were ministered to by the ladies of Mount Jackson and vicinity, and oft have they heard the sighs heaved by dying soldiers for loved ones at home. Those were trying times. Hundreds sleep there. Within a mile of this town is Our Soldiers' Cemetery, where lie the remains of 500 or 600 Confederate heroes, who sleep their last sleep. Most of the Confederate States are represented by the dead sleeping there—brave men who died in a cause they knew to be right; soldiers who gave up their lives defending their country from an invading foe. They all had homes and friends somewhere, and their names should not be forgotten. The very cause for which they died is an appeal to us, their survivors, to keep green the turf upon their graves and guard their last resting place from desecration. Their brave deeds and heroic self-sacrifice will be fresh in
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.42
Rest at Mt. Jackson. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, April 29, 1901.] Confederate dead in beautiful Shenandoah Cemetery. They appeal for assistance. Daughters of the Confederacy would erect a Monument over these fallen Heroes—Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama troops sleep there. To the Editor of the Dispatch. The Shenandoah river, in the Valley of Virginia—the garden spot of Virginia—was called by the Indians Minneha-ha, or, laughing waters. Situated on the bank of this beautiful stream is the town of Mount Jackson. This little town had its numerous experiences during the war between the States, from 1861-‘65. It had its joys and sorrows. Around it clusters many sad recollections and the memory of many daring and chivalrous deeds which will never be forgotten by those who survive. The people in the neighborhood were in the Confederacy heart and soul. The Confederate army established a large hospital here for the Southern
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.42
Rest at Mt. Jackson. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, April 29, 1901.] Confederate dead in beautiful Shenandoah Cemetery. They appeal for assistance. Daughters of the Confederacy would erect a Monument over these fallen Heroes—Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama troops sleep there. To the Editor of the Dispatch. The Shenandoah river, in the Valley of Virginia—the garden spot of Virginia—was called by the Indians Minneha-ha, or, laughing waters. Situated on the bank of this beautiful stream is the town of Mount Jackson. This little town had its numerous experiences during the war between the States, from 1861-‘65. It had its joys and sorrows. Around it clusters many sad recollections and the memory of many daring and chivalrous deeds which will never be forgotten by those who survive. The people in the neighborhood were in the Confederacy heart and soul. The Confederate army established a large hospital here for the Southern
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.42
Rest at Mt. Jackson. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, April 29, 1901.] Confederate dead in beautiful Shenandoah Cemetery. They appeal for assistance. Daughters of the Confederacy would erect a Monument over these fallen Heroes—Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama troops sleep there. To the Editor of the Dispatch. The Shenandoah river, in the Valley of Virginia—the garden spot of Virginia—was called by the Indians Minneha-ha, or, laughing waters. Situated on the bank of this beautiful stream is the town of Mount Jackson. This little town had its numerous experiences during the war between the States, from 1861-‘65. It had its joys and sorrows. Around it clusters many sad recollections and the memory of many daring and chivalrous deeds which will never be forgotten by those who survive. The people in the neighborhood were in the Confederacy heart and soul. The Confederate army established a large hospital here for the Southern
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.42
Bramlett, company G, 3d regiment. George Ford, company F, 23d regiment. Benjamin Freeman, 13th regiment. H. D. Hodell, company C. George W. Ford, company F, 23d regiment. F. J. Hancock, company H, 20th regiment. A. B. Bigger, company A, 1st regiment. J. T. Cront, company K, 20th regiment. Mathew Jones, company D, 2nd regiment. J. W. Frank, company E, 3rd regiment. Samuel Grodrey, company E, 15th regiment. J. G. Haltewanger, company C, 20th regiment. Miscellaneous. E. W. Snider, Texas. Josiah N. Martin, Louisiana. William Vicker, Baltimore, Md. J. Smith, Maryland. P. M. Koonce, Tennessee. Thomas P. Grey, Rockbridge artillery. Moses Jenkins, company B, 8th artillery. Godfrey Estlow, company K, 6th artillery. D. O. Rawhn, 8th Louisiana artillery. John L. Moise, company H, 17th artillery. L. M. Atkins, company H, 5th artillery. William C. Braddock, company I, 8th artillery. C. Boatner, Phillips' Legion. There are 112 graves unknown.
Shenandoah (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.42
Rest at Mt. Jackson. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, April 29, 1901.] Confederate dead in beautiful Shenandoah Cemetery. They appeal for assistance. Daughters of the Confederacy would erect a Monument over these fallen Heroes—Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama troops sleep there. To the Editor of the Dispatch. The Shenandoah river, in the Valley of Virginia—the garden spot of Virginia—was called by the Indians Minneha-ha, or, laughing waters. Situated on the bank of this beautiful stream is the town of Mount Jackson. This little town had its numerous experiences during the war between the States, from 1861-‘65. It had its joys and sorrows. Around it clusters many sad recollections and the memory of many daring and chivalrous deeds which will never be forgotten by those who survive. The people in the neighborhood were in the Confederacy heart and soul. The Confederate army established a large hospital here for the Southern s
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.42
Bramlett, company G, 3d regiment. George Ford, company F, 23d regiment. Benjamin Freeman, 13th regiment. H. D. Hodell, company C. George W. Ford, company F, 23d regiment. F. J. Hancock, company H, 20th regiment. A. B. Bigger, company A, 1st regiment. J. T. Cront, company K, 20th regiment. Mathew Jones, company D, 2nd regiment. J. W. Frank, company E, 3rd regiment. Samuel Grodrey, company E, 15th regiment. J. G. Haltewanger, company C, 20th regiment. Miscellaneous. E. W. Snider, Texas. Josiah N. Martin, Louisiana. William Vicker, Baltimore, Md. J. Smith, Maryland. P. M. Koonce, Tennessee. Thomas P. Grey, Rockbridge artillery. Moses Jenkins, company B, 8th artillery. Godfrey Estlow, company K, 6th artillery. D. O. Rawhn, 8th Louisiana artillery. John L. Moise, company H, 17th artillery. L. M. Atkins, company H, 5th artillery. William C. Braddock, company I, 8th artillery. C. Boatner, Phillips' Legion. There are 112 graves unknown.
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.42
Rest at Mt. Jackson. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, April 29, 1901.] Confederate dead in beautiful Shenandoah Cemetery. They appeal for assistance. Daughters of the Confederacy would erect a Monument over these fallen Heroes—Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama troops sleep there. To the Editor of the Dispatch. The Shenandoah river, in the Valley of Virginia—the garden spot of Virginia—was called by the Indians Minneha-ha, or, laughing waters. Situated on the bank of this beautiful stream is the town of Mount Jackson. This little town had its numerous experiences during the war between the States, from 1861-‘65. It had its joys and sorrows. Around it clusters many sad recollections and the memory of many daring and chivalrous deeds which will never be forgotten by those who survive. The people in the neighborhood were in the Confederacy heart and soul. The Confederate army established a large hospital here for the Southern
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.42
Bramlett, company G, 3d regiment. George Ford, company F, 23d regiment. Benjamin Freeman, 13th regiment. H. D. Hodell, company C. George W. Ford, company F, 23d regiment. F. J. Hancock, company H, 20th regiment. A. B. Bigger, company A, 1st regiment. J. T. Cront, company K, 20th regiment. Mathew Jones, company D, 2nd regiment. J. W. Frank, company E, 3rd regiment. Samuel Grodrey, company E, 15th regiment. J. G. Haltewanger, company C, 20th regiment. Miscellaneous. E. W. Snider, Texas. Josiah N. Martin, Louisiana. William Vicker, Baltimore, Md. J. Smith, Maryland. P. M. Koonce, Tennessee. Thomas P. Grey, Rockbridge artillery. Moses Jenkins, company B, 8th artillery. Godfrey Estlow, company K, 6th artillery. D. O. Rawhn, 8th Louisiana artillery. John L. Moise, company H, 17th artillery. L. M. Atkins, company H, 5th artillery. William C. Braddock, company I, 8th artillery. C. Boatner, Phillips' Legion. There are 112 graves unknown.
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