hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
David Hunter 245 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 186 0 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 174 0 Browse Search
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) 172 6 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 158 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 142 0 Browse Search
James 135 1 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 132 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 128 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 116 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 180 total hits in 96 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
Ewell, and Holmes. General Joseph E. Johnston, who was in charge of the Army of the Shenandoah, reinforced Beauregrrd on the 21st, after a forced march from the Valley of Virginia, his brigadiers being T. J. Jackson, Barnard E. Bee, and E. K. Smith. The twelve companies of cavalry were commanded by Colonel J. E. B. Stuart. In examining my file of papers, the Louisville Daily Courier, I find the following letters in the evening edition of August 5, 1861. The first is copied from the Atlanta (Ga.) Confederacy. It reads as follows: The battle was a decided success, and was fought with distinguished gallantry by all our troops who participated in it. It is but just to say, however, that the Fourth Alabama Regiment, Colonel Jones, the Seventh Georgia, Colonel Gartrell, and the Eighth Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel Gardner, both under Acting-Brigadier Bartow; the Fourth South Carolina, Colonel Sloane; Hampton's Legion, Colonel Hampton; the Sixth North Carolina, Colonel Fisher, and the
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
n, boys; to the rescue! and the men shouted at the top of their voices. When General Johnson saw Smith he exclaimed: The Blucher of the day has come. They soon arrived in front of the enemy, and with a shout that might be heard from one end of the battle-field to the other they launched at the adversary like a thunderbolt. They delivered but two fires, when the enemy began to give way, and in a few minutes they began to give way and were in full retreat. The brigade is composed of one Tennessee and one Mississippi regiment and a battalion from Maryland. As they rushed into the fight I could but recall with an appreciation, I never felt before the words of Holy writ, as terrible as an enemy with banners. The artillery companies did good service also. Those engaged were the New Orleans Washington Artillery, Latham's Battery from Lynchburg, Imboden's from Staunton, Kemper's from Alexandria, Thomas's from Richmond, Pendleton's from Lexington, Rogers's from Leesburg, and the Wise
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
: The Pennsylvania troops were expected to have joined the forces going into battle this week. I trust there will be no delay to prevent them sharing the honors of the expected battle General Scott to McClellan, July 21, A. M: Johnston has amused Patterson and reinforced Beauregard. McDowell this morning forcing the passage of Bull Run. In two hours he will turn the Manassas Junction and storm it to-day with superior force. General Scott to the commanding officer at Baltimore, July 21: Put your troops on the alert. Bad news from McDowell's army; not credited by me. Captain Alexander to Washington: General McDowell's army in full retreat. The day is lost. Save Washington and the remnants of this army. The routed troops will not reform. General Scott to McDowell: Under the circumstances it seems best to return to the line of the Potomac. President Davis to General Cooper, Manassas, July 21: Night has closed upon a hard foug
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
cipated in it. It is but just to say, however, that the Fourth Alabama Regiment, Colonel Jones, the Seventh Georgia, Colonel Gartrell, and the Eighth Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel Gardner, both under Acting-Brigadier Bartow; the Fourth South Carolina, Colonel Sloane; Hampton's Legion, Colonel Hampton; the Sixth North Carolina, Colonel Fisher, and the Eleventh and Seventh Virginia did the hardest fighting, suffered most, and bore the brunt of the battle. Colonel Kershaw's and Colonel Cash (South Carolina) regiments came into action late, but did most effective service in the pursuit, which continued nearly to Centreville. General E. K. Smith's brigade reached Manassas during the battle and rushed to the field, a distance of seven miles, through the broiling sun at a double quick. As they neared the field from a doulle-quick they got fairly to running, their eyes flashing, the officers crying out: On, boys; to the rescue! and the men shouted at the top of their voices. When General Jo
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
The First Manassas. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, August 10, 1902.] A man who was there tells about the great skedaddle. discipline of our troops. The lack of it was most Conspicuous—a writer who visited Beauregard's Camp when a boy recalls the great battle. Was there ever a more humiliating scene enacted in this country of ours than that as shown by the demoralized and fleeing United States troops at the first battle of Manassas? It has been some consolation to us old Confederates who have suffered so long and patiently since the close of the Civil war to know that the army of General McDowell, on the 21st day of July, 1861, composed of several thousand old regulars and 25,000 volunteers, were badly whipped by the Southern troops, who numbered not over 21,000, and of that number only about 16,000 were actually engaged. They had every advantage of us in means, ammunition, provisions, transportation, etc. Our regiments were made up of all grades and conditions of
Charlottesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
ove quietly arouud the tree he would keep out of my sight by moving around to the other side. Suddenly I heard the crack of a rifle, and the squirrel fell to the ground, shot through the head. To my surprise, I found that a young man (our overseer's son) had shot him from up the mountainside, some 150 yards from where I was standing. These men were independent and courageous, and often paid but little attention to the discipline imposed by their officers. While Colonel Strange, of Charlottesville, Va., was drilling his regiment in that town a short time before being ordered to the front, he said: Mr. Jones, stand square, sir! Mr. Jones immediately replied: Colonel Strange, I are squar, sir! Mr. Jones was a splendid specimen of the mountaineer, and of such material as many of the best Confederate soldiers were made. Yes, we whipped them badly at Manassas, sometimes called the battle of Bull Run by the skedaddlers, for it was the battle of Manassas that gave to
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
Virginia did the hardest fighting, suffered most, and bore the brunt of the battle. Colonel Kershaw's and Colonel Cash (South Carolina) regiments came into action late, but did most effective service in the pursuit, which continued nearly to Centreville. General E. K. Smith's brigade reached Manassas during the battle and rushed to the field, a distance of seven miles, through the broiling sun at a double quick. As they neared the field from a doulle-quick they got fairly to running, their Continental Congress during the first revolution, and therefrom our officers chose to send the aforesaid Mr. Harris to prison. I have just heard that five more of Ellsworth's Zouaves—Old Abe's pet lambs—were captured to-day in the woods near Centreville, one of whom was Colonel Farnham, the successor of Ellsworth. He had been wounded and the other remained behind to take care of him. While on a visit yesterday to the Seventh Regiment I had the satisfaction of examining their flag. It has
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
ires, when the enemy began to give way, and in a few minutes they began to give way and were in full retreat. The brigade is composed of one Tennessee and one Mississippi regiment and a battalion from Maryland. As they rushed into the fight I could but recall with an appreciation, I never felt before the words of Holy writ, as terrible as an enemy with banners. The artillery companies did good service also. Those engaged were the New Orleans Washington Artillery, Latham's Battery from Lynchburg, Imboden's from Staunton, Kemper's from Alexandria, Thomas's from Richmond, Pendleton's from Lexington, Rogers's from Leesburg, and the Wise Artillery, Captain Arburtus. The Washington Artillery and Latham's Battery and Kemper's were in position to do most, but all his companies manoeuvred well and delivered their fires with great effect. I do not believe that I have informed you in any of my letters that Colonel Cameron, of one of the Pennsylvania regiments, had been killed, and that
Canadian (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
ou, of the same regiment, who had his leg shot off. There is still another fact I cannot forbear to record. After the terrible fire to which the Eighteenth Georgia had been exposed and which they received with the immobility of a marble statue, General Beauregard passed the little remnant of the regiment that was still left and which was ready to strike yet another blow, and raising his cap with undisguised admiration and sympathy, he said: Eighteenth Georgia, I salute you. The Canadian press on the battle of Manassas. The Quebec Chronicle has the following: The New York press will be doubtless sadly downcast now. For ourselves, we have not exulted over the much vaunted victories, and see no great reason to rejoice in a northern defeat. All our desire is that the war should cease, and that we should be spared the spectacle of seeing brothers in race and language in mortal combat. Neither the North nor the South can subjugate the other. Let them agree to what we
Quebec (Canada) (search for this): chapter 1.30
ff. There is still another fact I cannot forbear to record. After the terrible fire to which the Eighteenth Georgia had been exposed and which they received with the immobility of a marble statue, General Beauregard passed the little remnant of the regiment that was still left and which was ready to strike yet another blow, and raising his cap with undisguised admiration and sympathy, he said: Eighteenth Georgia, I salute you. The Canadian press on the battle of Manassas. The Quebec Chronicle has the following: The New York press will be doubtless sadly downcast now. For ourselves, we have not exulted over the much vaunted victories, and see no great reason to rejoice in a northern defeat. All our desire is that the war should cease, and that we should be spared the spectacle of seeing brothers in race and language in mortal combat. Neither the North nor the South can subjugate the other. Let them agree to what we call a reparation de bieus, and be at peace. T
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...