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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Alleghany Mountains (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.41
father, Dr. Hugh Holmes McGuire, was a physician and surgeon of the older type, and it is not invidious to say that his fame exceeded that of any other member of his profession in all the regions west of the Blue Ridge mountains. Many came to him from afar to be healed. As a surgeon, his operations down to the close of his life fully sustained his well-earned reputation. His specialty, if any he had, was the eye, and multitudes came from Maryland, from Pennsylvania, and from beyond the Alleghanies to receive treatment at his hands. He was the frankest and the most unassuming of men; bluntness well-nigh to the verge of brusqueness marked his deliverances of speech, but no man had nicer perceptions of the proprieties of life, and none more free than he from intentionally wounding the sensibilities of others. His correctness and rapidity of diagnosis were marvellous. His originality in the selection of remedies, and in his methods of treatment, were matters of wonder and approval
Point Pleasant (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.41
ts of Virginia, the model for all such declarations for all States and for all time. There stands Marshall, the great expounder of the Constitution; universally conceded to have been one of the greatest jurists of any age. There stands Nelson, the financial support of the Revolutionary army; one of the truest patriots of his day, who insisted that his own house should be fired upon, because it shielded for the time the enemies of his country; and lastly, there stands Lewis, the hero of Point Pleasant, and the man who with his own hands fired one of the guns which drove the hated Dunmore and his minions from our soil. We can't stop even to name the great events which occurred between 1787 and 1861, in which Virginians figured, both as the civic and military leaders of the country, and can only say that during thirty-six out of the seventy-four years, then intervening, Virginia furnished the Chief Magistrate of the nation, whilst two others of those who filled that high office were
Fairfax (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.41
fe, and none more free than he from intentionally wounding the sensibilities of others. His correctness and rapidity of diagnosis were marvellous. His originality in the selection of remedies, and in his methods of treatment, were matters of wonder and approval by his profession. Although sixty years of age at the outbreak of the war, he instantly offered his services, was commissioned as surgeon, and placed in charge of the hospitals at Lexington. He had married Ann Eliza Moss, of Fairfax county, his first cousin, their mothers being daughters of Colonel Joseph Holmes, an officer in the Continental Line, and county lieutenant of Frederick county during the Revolutionary war. Of this marriage was born, on the 11th of October, 1835, Hunter Holmes McGuire, who was called after his great uncle, Major Andrew Hunter Holmes, an officer of the United States army, who had fallen at the battle of Mackinaw. Hunter received his academic education at the Winchester Academy, where he mi
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.41
Selfishness, in none of its Protean forms, can long escape detection, and the bluster of the bully and the braggart, and the vulgar feats of the swashbuckler and the bruiser are not mistaken for true courage. All men, in that relation, receive a just and lasting appraisement. Of these displays of professional skill from the binding of General Jackson's earliest wound at first Manassas to the last sad offices to his dying chief at Chancellorsville, and on down to the parting scenes at Appomattox, the achievements of this great master of his art must be recounted by more apt and fitter tongues than mine. It is now well known that the demands upon his skill as surgeon and physician did not exhaust or even employ the full measure of his large capacity. In other and more extended fields he displayed a genius for compact organization, a contemplation and grasp of broader needs of humanity, and a clear perception and an effective employment of the adequate means for their complete rel
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.41
impressive ceremonies. The following is the inscription: to Hunter Holmes McGuire, M. D., Ll. D., President of the American Medical and of the American Surgical associations; founder of the University College of Medicine; Medical Director, Jackson's Corps army of Northern Virginia; an eminent Civil and military Surgeon and beloved physician. an able teacher and vigorous writer; A Useful citizen and broad Humanitarian; gifted in mind and generous in heart, this monument is erected by his ustful friendship by one whom the whole world lauds. His brethren of both opposing armies unite in according to Hunter McGuire the entire credit of the inauguration of many reforms in the interest of economy and humanity. One, his comrade on Jackson's staff, who had opportunity for knowing whereof he spoke, has said of him: With his personal skill as an army surgeon and ability to advise and direct in the treatment and the operations of others, Dr. McGuire rapidly developed remarkable ad
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.41
nds of young and inexperienced leaders? How did the youthful Alexander so win over the trained legions of Philip as to achieve by them the conquest of Greece, and lead them across wide fields of Asia until their victorious march was stayed on the banks of the far distant Hyphasis? How did the younger Pitt so lead captive the Commons of England, make impotent the resistless logic of Fox, the profound philosphy and the gorgeous rhetoric of Burke, and hold them unbroken, in his resistance to Napoleon's pride, until he himself was stricken to his death by the baleful rays of the Star of Austerlitz? In every human heart, however benighted by ignorance, debauched by sin, or depraved by crime, there remains a susceptibility to the ennobling influences of heroism. Thomas Carlyle has said: It will ever be so. We all love great men; love, venerate and bow down submissive before great men; nay, can we honestly bow down to anything else? Ah, does not every true man feel that he is himself ma
Marice (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.41
e how in dramatic incident and romantic adventures these traits of his family character had prevailed, but it is appropriate now to notice only his immediate ancestry. His grandfather, Captain Edward McGuire, held that rank and station in the Continental Line, and had fought with success for the establishment of that republican form of government, the integrity of which his more distinguished grandson, near one hundred years later, fought in vain to preserve. His father, Dr. Hugh Holmes McGred his services, was commissioned as surgeon, and placed in charge of the hospitals at Lexington. He had married Ann Eliza Moss, of Fairfax county, his first cousin, their mothers being daughters of Colonel Joseph Holmes, an officer in the Continental Line, and county lieutenant of Frederick county during the Revolutionary war. Of this marriage was born, on the 11th of October, 1835, Hunter Holmes McGuire, who was called after his great uncle, Major Andrew Hunter Holmes, an officer of th
Bellevue (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.41
al of this book. These gentlemen resolved that on their return to Virginia such a movement should be inaugurated, and pressed with their own energy and that of the men they could gather for the work, as would not stop nor stay until the truth should be taught in our public schools, and books and men opposed to it be removed. Such a movement was inaugurated and a committee appointed, consisting of Professors Dabney, of the University of Virginia; White, of Washington and Lee; Abbott, of Bellevue; J. P. McGuire, of Richmond, and Vawter, of the Miller School, to take the matter in hand. The Grand Camp of Confederate Veterans of Virginia appointed a committee for the same purpose, of which committee, Hunter Mc-Guire was the chairman. On October 1, 1899, he submitted the report of the committee, prepared by himself. In that report is expressed his deepest convictions of the evil to be encountered, of the sources of that evil, and of the remedies to be employed for its eradication.
Austerlitz (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.41
egions of Philip as to achieve by them the conquest of Greece, and lead them across wide fields of Asia until their victorious march was stayed on the banks of the far distant Hyphasis? How did the younger Pitt so lead captive the Commons of England, make impotent the resistless logic of Fox, the profound philosphy and the gorgeous rhetoric of Burke, and hold them unbroken, in his resistance to Napoleon's pride, until he himself was stricken to his death by the baleful rays of the Star of Austerlitz? In every human heart, however benighted by ignorance, debauched by sin, or depraved by crime, there remains a susceptibility to the ennobling influences of heroism. Thomas Carlyle has said: It will ever be so. We all love great men; love, venerate and bow down submissive before great men; nay, can we honestly bow down to anything else? Ah, does not every true man feel that he is himself made higher by doing reverence to what is really above him? No nobler or more blessed feeling dwel
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.41
the college was also the Clinical Professor of Surgery. He was one of the founders of the Medical Society of Virginia in 1870, and for several years was the chairman of its Executive Committee, and in 1880 became its President. Honorary degrees and preferments have in this age lost much of their original significance, but never were these more worthily bestowed than upon this most deserving person. In 1887, the degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon him by the University of North Carolina, and in 1888, by the Jefferson College, of Philadelphia. ,In 1869, he became President of the Richmond Academy of Medicine, and in 1875, President of the Association of Medical Officers of the Army and Navy of the Confederate States. In 1889, he was made President of the Southern Surgical and Gynecological Association. In 1876, he was Vice-President of the International Medical Congress. In 1893, the Vice-President, and 1896, the President of the American Medical Association.
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