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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Emmitsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
ly and served as his orderly for ten days a month or more before he was killed. He was a perfect type of the gentleman and soldier, with lovable characteristics. His manner was charming, with almost the gentleness of a woman. As a soldier he was able, skillful and exacting; in battle a warrior and among the bravest and most daring, his dark eyes flashing and as black as coals. He wore a black beard and hair rather long. To recur to the battlefield: Having, in the charge, crossed the Emmitsburg road and being in the line of skirmishers, the index finger of my right hand was shot off near the hand by a bullet, yet it hung from the stump. I tied it up and marched on, firing 20 or more rounds, pulling the trigger with my second finger. As Captain Campbell, myself and the two Yankee soldiers moved to the rear, a heavy fire was kept up from the Federal lines. Near Willoughby's run we were accosted by a wounded Confederate lieutenant, also going to the rear. In an instant a cann
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
, about August 15th, which occasioned some surprise and rejoicing, as I had been reported dead. Marylanders with Garnett. At Gettysburg our company was just 100 strong—a fine body of men and officers. We had a number of recruits from Maryland who, though untrained, were as brave and excellent soldiers as the veterans. We volunteered as skirmishers to our regiment in Pickett's charge. This was done in the presence of General Robert E. Lee, who seemed to personally look after this ha our 100 men on the skirmish line but 8 went through the charge unscathed; more than 90 were killed or wounded. Our good and brave Capt. Camphell was killed at Five Forks, Va., April 1st, 1865. The adjutant of our regiment, Hugh McCullough, of Maryland, was always conspicuously brave and capable. My company G of the 18th Virginia Infantry, was raised in Nottoway county, Va., and started out 100 strong, but only 28 surrendered at Appomattox, and of these only 3 men among the original 100. D
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
owing the retreat of General Lee's army, two physicians named Weaver—father and son—residents of Gettysburg, gave diligent personal attention and saw that the graves were marked, or otherwise indicated, looking to the ultimate removal of the remains. After the war many of the dead were taken away by relatives. In 1872 and 1873 the younger Dr. Weaver (the father having died) began sending the remains to points in the South, such as Richmond, Va., Raleigh, N. C., Charleston, S. C., and Savannah, Ga., under agreements with Confederate memorial associations in those cities, and the work was completed during the years stated. Dr. Weaver having met Col. Peters in Baltimore and disclosed his operations, the bodies of Marylanders were sent here and reinterred in Loudon Park Cemetery. Col. Peters says Dr. Weaver's efforts were a labor of love, for which he was never fully reimbursed or compensated. About 3,000 was the number of Confederate dead cared for by the two doctors, chiefly by th
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
n. Richard B. Garnett, who fell at Gettysburg, (from the Baltimore sun, of November 4, and December 3, 1905.) Returned to his niece, Mrs. John B. Purcell, Richmond, Va., By Col. Winfield Peters, Quarter Master General, U. C. V., with account of how General Garnett met his death. A valuable relic of the war between the Stater 22, 1903. Mr. James E. Steuart, his nephew is now enabled to forward the sword to its rightful possessor by descent, who is the wife of Col. John B. Purcell, Richmond, Va. General Garnett was the only remaining brother of Mrs. Purcell's mother, who was deeply attached to him, and, through Col. Purcell, has assured Mr. Steuart, thead were taken away by relatives. In 1872 and 1873 the younger Dr. Weaver (the father having died) began sending the remains to points in the South, such as Richmond, Va., Raleigh, N. C., Charleston, S. C., and Savannah, Ga., under agreements with Confederate memorial associations in those cities, and the work was completed duri
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
the unknown Confederate dead. The recovery of General Garnett's sword is due to the late Gen. George H. Steuart, of Baltimore, likewise a West Point graduate, who also led his brigade in a desperate charge at Gettysburg a few hours before Picketch other, from opposite directions, would have overlapped. Years ago General Steuart found, in a second-hand shop in Baltimore, this sword of General Garnett and purchased it. General Steuart died November 22, 1903. Mr. James E. Steuart, his nepassociations in those cities, and the work was completed during the years stated. Dr. Weaver having met Col. Peters in Baltimore and disclosed his operations, the bodies of Marylanders were sent here and reinterred in Loudon Park Cemetery. Col. Petand surrendered at Appomattox April 9th, 1865. Mr. Clay, who by occupation is a collector and clerk, has resided in Baltimore since 1868 and lives with his family at 666 West Fayette street. Mr. and Mrs. Clay were married in Petersburg, Va., in
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
ed on the field; following the retreat of General Lee's army, two physicians named Weaver—father and son—residents of Gettysburg, gave diligent personal attention and saw that the graves were marked, or otherwise indicated, looking to the ultimate removal of the remains. After the war many of the dead were taken away by relatives. In 1872 and 1873 the younger Dr. Weaver (the father having died) began sending the remains to points in the South, such as Richmond, Va., Raleigh, N. C., Charleston, S. C., and Savannah, Ga., under agreements with Confederate memorial associations in those cities, and the work was completed during the years stated. Dr. Weaver having met Col. Peters in Baltimore and disclosed his operations, the bodies of Marylanders were sent here and reinterred in Loudon Park Cemetery. Col. Peters says Dr. Weaver's efforts were a labor of love, for which he was never fully reimbursed or compensated. About 3,000 was the number of Confederate dead cared for by the two d
Nottoway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
the Federals and Confederates being first separated. One deep trench was about 20 feet long, 12 feet wide and 20 feet deep, and it was filled. I was enabled to keep up with our army, retreating to Virginia, and finally reached my home in Nottoway county, Va., about August 15th, which occasioned some surprise and rejoicing, as I had been reported dead. Marylanders with Garnett. At Gettysburg our company was just 100 strong—a fine body of men and officers. We had a number of recruits and brave Capt. Camphell was killed at Five Forks, Va., April 1st, 1865. The adjutant of our regiment, Hugh McCullough, of Maryland, was always conspicuously brave and capable. My company G of the 18th Virginia Infantry, was raised in Nottoway county, Va., and started out 100 strong, but only 28 surrendered at Appomattox, and of these only 3 men among the original 100. During the four years war 473 names appeared on the company roll, and these are inscribed on the Confederate monument erec
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
. The adjutant of our regiment, Hugh McCullough, of Maryland, was always conspicuously brave and capable. My company G of the 18th Virginia Infantry, was raised in Nottoway county, Va., and started out 100 strong, but only 28 surrendered at Appomattox, and of these only 3 men among the original 100. During the four years war 473 names appeared on the company roll, and these are inscribed on the Confederate monument erected at Nottoway Court-house. Of all these, beside myself, I believe that only two survive: Junius Hardaway, of Crewe, Va., and James Farley, of Blackstone, Va. Having been asked the question as to myself, will say: I enlisted in my company in March, 1862, at the age of 17, was in 26 battles and surrendered at Appomattox April 9th, 1865. Mr. Clay, who by occupation is a collector and clerk, has resided in Baltimore since 1868 and lives with his family at 666 West Fayette street. Mr. and Mrs. Clay were married in Petersburg, Va., in 1866. Of their 11 children 6
Blackstone (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
ously brave and capable. My company G of the 18th Virginia Infantry, was raised in Nottoway county, Va., and started out 100 strong, but only 28 surrendered at Appomattox, and of these only 3 men among the original 100. During the four years war 473 names appeared on the company roll, and these are inscribed on the Confederate monument erected at Nottoway Court-house. Of all these, beside myself, I believe that only two survive: Junius Hardaway, of Crewe, Va., and James Farley, of Blackstone, Va. Having been asked the question as to myself, will say: I enlisted in my company in March, 1862, at the age of 17, was in 26 battles and surrendered at Appomattox April 9th, 1865. Mr. Clay, who by occupation is a collector and clerk, has resided in Baltimore since 1868 and lives with his family at 666 West Fayette street. Mr. and Mrs. Clay were married in Petersburg, Va., in 1866. Of their 11 children 6 survive. Virginians should proudly erect statues to the three fearless and ga
Crewe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
gh, of Maryland, was always conspicuously brave and capable. My company G of the 18th Virginia Infantry, was raised in Nottoway county, Va., and started out 100 strong, but only 28 surrendered at Appomattox, and of these only 3 men among the original 100. During the four years war 473 names appeared on the company roll, and these are inscribed on the Confederate monument erected at Nottoway Court-house. Of all these, beside myself, I believe that only two survive: Junius Hardaway, of Crewe, Va., and James Farley, of Blackstone, Va. Having been asked the question as to myself, will say: I enlisted in my company in March, 1862, at the age of 17, was in 26 battles and surrendered at Appomattox April 9th, 1865. Mr. Clay, who by occupation is a collector and clerk, has resided in Baltimore since 1868 and lives with his family at 666 West Fayette street. Mr. and Mrs. Clay were married in Petersburg, Va., in 1866. Of their 11 children 6 survive. Virginians should proudly erect s
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