hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Fitzhugh Lee 208 2 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 188 0 Browse Search
1862 AD 159 159 Browse Search
Edward Johnson 139 13 Browse Search
James Longstreet 135 1 Browse Search
J. A. Early 121 1 Browse Search
Richard Stoddard Ewell 121 3 Browse Search
Robert E. Rodes 121 3 Browse Search
1863 AD 109 109 Browse Search
Alabama (Alabama, United States) 106 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 134 total hits in 57 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
little girl bravely came into the enemy's tent with the maimed and dying and fed with a spoon her fallen defender. (God bless her!) All of their ambulances being engaged hauling their own wounded to the White House for shipment North, they fitted up a spring wagon drawn by four horses, by filling the body with pine tags, specially for me alone, and detailed one of my own men, slightly wounded, to wait on me. On my arrival at the wharf, while waiting, my three officers—Captain Stratton, Lieutenant Reid, and Lieutenant Anderson (under guard) found me in wagon. I made one of the Sanitary Commission, constantly passing dispensing every known delicacy to eat and to drink, to their wounded, give them a drink of French brandy, and the driver fill their haversacks from the barrell of provisions in the wagon. I never saw but one of them again. In Washington, hearing Earley's guns on the Suburbs. I was shipped hence to Lincoln Hospital, Washington, D. C. While lying on my cot afterward
Norman V. Randolph (search for this): chapter 1.15
ch at the battle of Waterloo. The loss of officers was full ninety per cent. of all engaged (mostly killed.) It was there the dashing Colonel Edward Willis, of the 12th Georgia (in temporary command of our brigade), was killed. His staff officer, the chivalrous young Lieutenant Randolph, Joseph Tucker Randolph, eldest son of the late veteran bookseller and publisher, Joseph W. Randolph and his wife Honora Mary Tucker, sister of Captain John Randolph Tucker, U. S. Navy, the late Major Norman V. Randolph, identified so conspicuously with the weal and progress of our city and section, was a younger son. of Richmond, also was killed; 'twas there the brave Col. J. B. Terrill, of the Thirteenth Virginia, ended his useful career, as did, also, Major Watkins, the brave soldier of the Fifty-second. 'Twas there Colonel J. C. Gibson, like an old war-horse, always scenting the battle in the breeze, came down from the hospital on one leg and got the other shattered to pieces. In fact, ever
ly nothing at all to eat for forty-five days but a little rotten cornmeal filled bugs, without salt or anyway to cook it. Our comrades were dying by squads daily, the dead house was filled all the time with corpses. Scores of cats would enter through holes and prey upon the dead. Some of us would put bags over the holes through which the cats entered, and some would go in with clubs, and soon we would have a full supply of cats. They were eaten ravenously by the starving officers, as Lieutenant Peary's men ate their comrades. At last we were ordered back to Fort Delaware. The remnant of the six hundred left that Yankee hell, where Southern braves cried for bread and fed on cats, gorged with the corpses of their dead comrades. We reached Fort Delaware a short time before the surrender. One morning I was aroused by a familiar rebel yell—looked out and saw the flags drooping at half mast and heard that Booth had killed Lincoln. Soon all privates and line officers were paroled, and
J. P. Walker (search for this): chapter 1.15
re Southern braves cried for bread and fed on cats, gorged with the corpses of their dead comrades. We reached Fort Delaware a short time before the surrender. One morning I was aroused by a familiar rebel yell—looked out and saw the flags drooping at half mast and heard that Booth had killed Lincoln. Soon all privates and line officers were paroled, and sixty field officers were held in prison until August. The old brigade, whose regiment furnished Early, William Smith, A. P. Hill, J. P. Walker and J. B. Terrell. In conclusion I will say that some years ago Captain James Bumgardner, of Staunton, who was an officer in the Fifty-second Virginia Regiment, next on the left of the Forty-ninth, told me that his regiment also had only three officers and eighteen men left. Thus and there at Bethesda Church well nigh perished one of the grandest corps of men the world has ever known—made up of the best young blood of Virginia, fighting for their Lares and Penates;—their exploits wou<
Eugene Flippin (search for this): chapter 1.15
Forty-ninth was the extreme right of our line. The enemy's line overlapped, outflanked, and encompassed us. It seemed we were shot at from everywhere. Finally the brave old Captain Stratton, from Nelson, said: Colonel, in five minutes you won't have a man left, let them surrender! Seeing the futility of continuing the unequal struggle of three officers and eighteen men against twenty thousand of the enemy, I said: Captain, that is so, let them surrender, but I'll be hanged if I will. Eugene Flippin, of Lowesville, (whose leg had just been torn off), laying close by, heard this and raised a so-called white flag, red with blood and black with powder, and the enemy ceased firing. The little remnant of the Forty-ninth Virginia Regiment stood up at an order arms, after which the writer started to run the gauntlet of death and cut his way out, if possible. I got about fifty yards and cleared the men when, as General Anderson, who commanded the Pennsylvania reserves we were fighting af
William Smith, A. P. Hill, J. P. Walker and J. B. Terrell. In conclusion I will say that some years ago Captain James Bumgardner, of Staunton, who was an officer in the Fifty-second Virginia Regiment, next on the left of the Forty-ninth, told me that his regiment also had only three officers and eighteen men left. Thus and there at Bethesda Church well nigh perished one of the grandest corps of men the world has ever known—made up of the best young blood of Virginia, fighting for their Lares and Penates;—their exploits would brighten the fairest names upon the roll of Battle Abbey, and vie with the knightliest of any age. A brigade that had been led to victory by General Early on a hundred battle-fields; that had swept everything before it like a tornado; a brigade under whose flag you had fought and bled; a brigade that had furnished to the Confederacy four or five generals: Early, William Smith, A. P. Hill, J. A. Walker and J. B. Terrill (whose commission was on his way to him
Westminster Abbey (search for this): chapter 1.15
t some years ago Captain James Bumgardner, of Staunton, who was an officer in the Fifty-second Virginia Regiment, next on the left of the Forty-ninth, told me that his regiment also had only three officers and eighteen men left. Thus and there at Bethesda Church well nigh perished one of the grandest corps of men the world has ever known—made up of the best young blood of Virginia, fighting for their Lares and Penates;—their exploits would brighten the fairest names upon the roll of Battle Abbey, and vie with the knightliest of any age. A brigade that had been led to victory by General Early on a hundred battle-fields; that had swept everything before it like a tornado; a brigade under whose flag you had fought and bled; a brigade that had furnished to the Confederacy four or five generals: Early, William Smith, A. P. Hill, J. A. Walker and J. B. Terrill (whose commission was on his way to him when he fell), thus to be slaughtered. The absent wounded returned; the ranks were recrui
n a deep water furrow, which saved me from being riddled. I had already been shot in the throat. Later they threw out a line of skirmishers: these advanced to where I lay—a sandy haired fellow leveled his gun at me and ordered me up. I told him I was wounded and perhaps bleeding to death. He gazed at me an instant and soliloquized: What a likely fellow! What a pity! What a pity! and moved on a few yards, when a shot from the woods fatally wounded him. He came staggering back, crying, Johnny Reb, please kill me—fell a few yards off crying out with pain—got up and staggered a few yards further—fell and was hushed in death. The skirmish line then retired into the trenches until after dark, when they covered the ground and commenced removing the wounded. Generous conduct of the enemy. The enemy treated me with great consideration and kindness, I was the ranking living officer of the brigade they had to deal with. General Anderson (I think that was the officer's name) who com
J. C. Gibson (search for this): chapter 1.15
the late veteran bookseller and publisher, Joseph W. Randolph and his wife Honora Mary Tucker, sister of Captain John Randolph Tucker, U. S. Navy, the late Major Norman V. Randolph, identified so conspicuously with the weal and progress of our city and section, was a younger son. of Richmond, also was killed; 'twas there the brave Col. J. B. Terrill, of the Thirteenth Virginia, ended his useful career, as did, also, Major Watkins, the brave soldier of the Fifty-second. 'Twas there Colonel J. C. Gibson, like an old war-horse, always scenting the battle in the breeze, came down from the hospital on one leg and got the other shattered to pieces. In fact, every field officer and nearly every company officer in the brigade, present in action, was either killed or wounded. General Lee's lines were formed at right angles to the——road leading down James River near second Cold Harbor. The enemy on our front shifted their position and threw up earthworks lower down on the road, and paral
C. B. Christian (search for this): chapter 1.15
es-dispatch, August 13th, 1905. Graphic description of it by Lieutenant Colonel C. B. Christian. The color bearer killed. One among the bloodiest Contesttates Army, was a West Pointer, and had been killed at Perryville, Ky. Colonel Christian's account of this combat gives us a picturesque glimpse of the charge of First Manassas, and sustained its reputation to the close of its career. Colonel Christian was a V. M. I. man and one of those sturdy fighting men who always had hi steadily fighting at the time of this action that reports are scant, and Colonel Christian is doing his State and his comrades worthy service in thus giving his mems told me, three thousand shots were fired at me, all at once. Lieutenant-Colonel C. B. Christian wounded and captured. One of the first struck me between my ea, but this historic old Fourth Virginia Brigade died then and there at Bethesda Church. Your friend and comrade, C. B. Christian. Walker's Ford, Amherst Co., Va.
1 2 3 4 5 6