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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
cavalry raids for which heretofore only the Confederates had distinguished themselves; Van Dorn, Forrest and Morgan had set the example which was to be followed by Colonel Grierson, in a bold movement from LaGrange, Tennessee, through the State of Mississippi to Baton Rouge, La. The forces placed under Colonel Grierson consisted of a brigade 1,700 strong, composed of the Sixth and Seventh Illinois and second Iowa Cavalry. Colonel Grierson, after leaving LaGrange, Tenn., proceeded due south, beth John B. Gage lieutenant-colonel. Afterwards these two regiments were attached to Mabry's Brigade and formed part of Forrest's Cavalry Corps. Colonel Powers' and Colonel Griffith's Regiments were assigned to duty in east Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi. Colonel Gage was killed and Colonel Stockdale seriously wounded, as was Captain James M. Ferguson, adjutant, at Harrisburg, Miss.; where many of the best and bravest of the old commands gave up their lives. The memory of their proud
Hazlehurst (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
d then it was boots and saddles, and the command was away again at a swinging trot. On reaching Summit, Miss., scouts reported that Grierson had headed for Natchez. The command then headed in a northwestwardly direction, and crossed the Homochitto river at Davis' Plantation on the Woodville and Natchez road. As this river was up, and the facilities for crossing very poor, the command was delayed several hours, thus giving Grierson time to double on his course, return to the railroad at Hazlehurst, and thence down to Bogue Chitto and then to Baton Rouge. On the 23d of May, 1863, General Banks crossed the Mississippi River opposite Bayou Sara, with an army of 25,000 men, and the next day Port Hudson was besieged on the North, while General C. C. Augur's Division of 5,000, augmented by Grierson's cavalry brigade of 1,600 men from Baton Rouge, invested it on the south. On the evening of May 23rd Stockdale's Battalion proceeded down the plank road towards Baton Rouge to reconnoite
Davis Plantation (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
plaint was heard. As the command struck the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad it was expected that the enemy would be encountered at any moment. The column was only halted long enough to give the men and horses a few hours rest; and then it was boots and saddles, and the command was away again at a swinging trot. On reaching Summit, Miss., scouts reported that Grierson had headed for Natchez. The command then headed in a northwestwardly direction, and crossed the Homochitto river at Davis' Plantation on the Woodville and Natchez road. As this river was up, and the facilities for crossing very poor, the command was delayed several hours, thus giving Grierson time to double on his course, return to the railroad at Hazlehurst, and thence down to Bogue Chitto and then to Baton Rouge. On the 23d of May, 1863, General Banks crossed the Mississippi River opposite Bayou Sara, with an army of 25,000 men, and the next day Port Hudson was besieged on the North, while General C. C. Augur'
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
out. On reaching the plankroad, all companies reformed, and a retrograde movement ensued. This was considered a brilliant affair, and one attended with great danger, as it was a night attack, clearly within the enemy's lines and against superior numbers, with the prospect of having Grierson's cavalry come in the rear, and thus cut off our only means of retreat. A million dollars worth of supplies intended for Banks' army were destroyed. The writer witnessed at Johnsonville, on the Tennessee river, in November, 1864, such another sight, when General Forrest destroyed Sherman's military supplies, together with several gunboats and many transports—a conflagration once seen never to be forgotten or effaced from the human mind. So strenuous had been these daring raids and attacks by the Confederate cavalry on the enemy, that General Banks at last concluded to take active measures to destroy or drive from his flank and rear the forces under Colonel Powers; and, to that end, placed al
Tupelo (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
lion was merged with that of Colonel Wilbourne, and from that time was known as the Fourth Mississippi Cavalry, Stockdale becoming lieutenant-colonel. Gage's Battalion, with Garland's and some detached companies, were merged into a regiment and designated as the Fourteenth Confederate Regiment, Colonel Dumonteil commanding, with John B. Gage lieutenant-colonel. Afterwards these two regiments were attached to Mabry's Brigade and formed part of Forrest's Cavalry Corps. Colonel Powers' and Colonel Griffith's Regiments were assigned to duty in east Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi. Colonel Gage was killed and Colonel Stockdale seriously wounded, as was Captain James M. Ferguson, adjutant, at Harrisburg, Miss.; where many of the best and bravest of the old commands gave up their lives. The memory of their proud deeds cannot die, They may go down to dust in bloody shrouds, And sleep in nameless grave, but, for all time, Foundlings of Fame are our beloved lost. W. H. Pascoe.
Plunkett (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
n the river and anchored. The Kineo, receiving a shot through her rudder post, followed their example. So accurate was the fire from the Confederate batteries that the destruction of the whole fleet was imminent. The Mississippi grounded, the officers and crew abandoning her, escaping to the shore opposite Port Hudson. The vessel soon drifted down the river and finally exploded. At that time Colonel Frank Powers assumed command of all the cavalry in that department, which consisted of Aiken's Ninth Tennessee Battalion, 350 men; Stockdale's Mississippi Battalion, 250 men; Gage's Louisiana Battalion, 250 men, and the Eleventh and Seventeenth Arkansas Mounted Infantry (consolidated), commanded by Colonel Griffith, numbering about 500 men, and Garland's Battalion, a total of 1,350 men at that time promiscuously armed (except the mounted infantry) with shotguns, Belgian rifles, etc. This small force contested Banks' advance as best it could, succeeding, however, in preventing partie
Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
t. The entire Confederate force in the State bordering on the Mississippi was then being gathered together to meet the terrific blow which Grant was preparing to strike at Vicksburg. Thus the way was open for one of those bold cavalry raids for which heretofore only the Confederates had distinguished themselves; Van Dorn, Forrest and Morgan had set the example which was to be followed by Colonel Grierson, in a bold movement from LaGrange, Tennessee, through the State of Mississippi to Baton Rouge, La. The forces placed under Colonel Grierson consisted of a brigade 1,700 strong, composed of the Sixth and Seventh Illinois and second Iowa Cavalry. Colonel Grierson, after leaving LaGrange, Tenn., proceeded due south, between the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad (now the Illinois Central Railroad) and the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, until he reached Raleigh, Miss.; turning then southwest to Gallatin, Miss., and within seven miles of Natchez, and then back to the New Orleans and Jackson Rail
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
alion was merged with that of Colonel Wilbourne, and from that time was known as the Fourth Mississippi Cavalry, Stockdale becoming lieutenant-colonel. Gage's Battalion, with Garland's and some detached companies, were merged into a regiment and designated as the Fourteenth Confederate Regiment, Colonel Dumonteil commanding, with John B. Gage lieutenant-colonel. Afterwards these two regiments were attached to Mabry's Brigade and formed part of Forrest's Cavalry Corps. Colonel Powers' and Colonel Griffith's Regiments were assigned to duty in east Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi. Colonel Gage was killed and Colonel Stockdale seriously wounded, as was Captain James M. Ferguson, adjutant, at Harrisburg, Miss.; where many of the best and bravest of the old commands gave up their lives. The memory of their proud deeds cannot die, They may go down to dust in bloody shrouds, And sleep in nameless grave, but, for all time, Foundlings of Fame are our beloved lost. W. H. Pascoe.
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
ays and nights stood in the trenches suffering from hunger and thirst, with a semitropic sun beating down upon them, with sickness decimating their ranks, exposed both night and day to a terrific fire from the Federal fleet stationed in the Mississippi river above and below the fort, repelling assault after assault from the land forces of General Banks and Augur, fighting only as Confederate soldiers could fight, and holding out even after Vicksburg had surrendered to General Grant. If ever thudiced, it is to be hoped that General Frank Gardner, the brave defender of Port Hudson, and the gallent men under him will receive their word of praise for their devotion to the Confederate cause. Port Hudson is located on a bend in the Mississippi river, about 150 miles above New Orleans, and twenty-five miles from Baton Rouge, at the terminus of the Clinton and Port Hudson railroad. Shortly after the fall of New Orleans, the Confederate Government, realizing the importance of Port Huds
Summit (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
the purpose of intercepting and capturing the command of Grierson. No soldiers were never more eager to meet an enemy, and riding night and day, not a word of complaint was heard. As the command struck the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad it was expected that the enemy would be encountered at any moment. The column was only halted long enough to give the men and horses a few hours rest; and then it was boots and saddles, and the command was away again at a swinging trot. On reaching Summit, Miss., scouts reported that Grierson had headed for Natchez. The command then headed in a northwestwardly direction, and crossed the Homochitto river at Davis' Plantation on the Woodville and Natchez road. As this river was up, and the facilities for crossing very poor, the command was delayed several hours, thus giving Grierson time to double on his course, return to the railroad at Hazlehurst, and thence down to Bogue Chitto and then to Baton Rouge. On the 23d of May, 1863, General Ban
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