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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
s Valedictorian; for a time was a teacher, latterly as Professor of Mathematics at Madison College, Penn.; studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1854. Was elected to the House of Delegates from Isle of Wight county and served the session 1855-6; became a member of the law firm of Godwin & Crocker, Portsmouth, Va., in 1856, and continued in successful practice, until it was dissolved by the election of the partners respectively to be Judges of the Corporation Courts of the cities of Norfolk, and of Portsmouth, Va. Judge Crocker resigned in 1906. As Adjutant of the Ninth Virginia Infantry he was severely wounded at the battle of Malvern Hill; wounded and taken prisoner at Gettysburg, and sent first to David's Island, N. Y., and later to Johnson's Island. By his comrades of the trying days of the momentous struggle of the South, he is warmly beloved for admirably exemplified traits, nor is he less regarded universally in his honorable civil career. Hon. R. S. Thomas
Johnson's Island (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
r of the law firm of Godwin & Crocker, Portsmouth, Va., in 1856, and continued in successful practice, until it was dissolved by the election of the partners respectively to be Judges of the Corporation Courts of the cities of Norfolk, and of Portsmouth, Va. Judge Crocker resigned in 1906. As Adjutant of the Ninth Virginia Infantry he was severely wounded at the battle of Malvern Hill; wounded and taken prisoner at Gettysburg, and sent first to David's Island, N. Y., and later to Johnson's Island. By his comrades of the trying days of the momentous struggle of the South, he is warmly beloved for admirably exemplified traits, nor is he less regarded universally in his honorable civil career. Hon. R. S. Thomas is the second son of the mother of Judge Crocker, by her second marriage with James Thomas, and as Mister Dick, as he is familiarly called by those of his section who know well why they should love him, writes: His (Judge Crocker's) father died six months after he was
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
of their fame and glory. The personal reminisence of the war which I next most value and cherish is the feeling with which we made that memorable charge at Malvern Hill. It was our first battle, for the occurrences in which we shared at Seven Pines, did not amount to an engagement. It can never be indifferent to note the feever a hero to ourselves. Shall I say it? Yes, for it can be equally said of each of you who were there. I have ever seemed to myself to have been a hero at Malvern Hill—if to be a hero is to feel the loftiest enthusiasm of patriotism—to disdain danger—to stand in the raging storm of shot and shell with a glad sense of duty and Ninth Virginia, took in this memorable charge. Armistead's Brigade, to which our regiment belonged, were the first troops to reach the immediate vicinity of Malvern Hill, arriving there at 10 A. M. Tuesday, July 1st, 1862. On arrival our regiment was detached from the brigade to guard a strategic point and did not rejoin it un<
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
er, Hon. Richard S. Thomas, of Smithfield, I have had cause to rejoice in the friendship of for years. They come of worthy life-springs in an ancestry dating to the settlement of Ould Virginia. James Francis Crocker, the second son of James and Frances Hill (Woodley) Crocker, was born January 5th, 1828; was graduated from Pennsylvania College, at Gettysburg, in the class of 1850, and was its Valedictorian; for a time was a teacher, latterly as Professor of Mathematics at Madison College, Penn.; studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1854. Was elected to the House of Delegates from Isle of Wight county and served the session 1855-6; became a member of the law firm of Godwin & Crocker, Portsmouth, Va., in 1856, and continued in successful practice, until it was dissolved by the election of the partners respectively to be Judges of the Corporation Courts of the cities of Norfolk, and of Portsmouth, Va. Judge Crocker resigned in 1906. As Adjutant of the Ninth Virginia I
David's Island, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
he session 1855-6; became a member of the law firm of Godwin & Crocker, Portsmouth, Va., in 1856, and continued in successful practice, until it was dissolved by the election of the partners respectively to be Judges of the Corporation Courts of the cities of Norfolk, and of Portsmouth, Va. Judge Crocker resigned in 1906. As Adjutant of the Ninth Virginia Infantry he was severely wounded at the battle of Malvern Hill; wounded and taken prisoner at Gettysburg, and sent first to David's Island, N. Y., and later to Johnson's Island. By his comrades of the trying days of the momentous struggle of the South, he is warmly beloved for admirably exemplified traits, nor is he less regarded universally in his honorable civil career. Hon. R. S. Thomas is the second son of the mother of Judge Crocker, by her second marriage with James Thomas, and as Mister Dick, as he is familiarly called by those of his section who know well why they should love him, writes: His (Judge Crocker's) fa
Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
ing up arms and in the battle of Malvern Hill. Gettysburg—Pickett's charge. Addresses by James F. Crocker, before Stonewall camp Confederate Veterans, Portsmouth, Va., February 6, 1889, and November 7, 1894, [The following articles from the unmistakable sincerity of the author, as from his heart—the fount directive of hin 1854. Was elected to the House of Delegates from Isle of Wight county and served the session 1855-6; became a member of the law firm of Godwin & Crocker, Portsmouth, Va., in 1856, and continued in successful practice, until it was dissolved by the election of the partners respectively to be Judges of the Corporation Courts of the cities of Norfolk, and of Portsmouth, Va. Judge Crocker resigned in 1906. As Adjutant of the Ninth Virginia Infantry he was severely wounded at the battle of Malvern Hill; wounded and taken prisoner at Gettysburg, and sent first to David's Island, N. Y., and later to Johnson's Island. By his comrades of the trying day
Frances Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
d as to faults conspiring to thwart the plans of a consummate soldier and peerless leader, that farther dissension should be deprecated. It has never been my privilege to meet Judge Crocker, but his brother, by the second marriage of his mother, Hon. Richard S. Thomas, of Smithfield, I have had cause to rejoice in the friendship of for years. They come of worthy life-springs in an ancestry dating to the settlement of Ould Virginia. James Francis Crocker, the second son of James and Frances Hill (Woodley) Crocker, was born January 5th, 1828; was graduated from Pennsylvania College, at Gettysburg, in the class of 1850, and was its Valedictorian; for a time was a teacher, latterly as Professor of Mathematics at Madison College, Penn.; studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1854. Was elected to the House of Delegates from Isle of Wight county and served the session 1855-6; became a member of the law firm of Godwin & Crocker, Portsmouth, Va., in 1856, and continued in success
Lewis A. Armistead (search for this): chapter 1.23
nett, Fiske, White and others dear in the memory of us all. Let us recall the part which our own regiment, the Ninth Virginia, took in this memorable charge. Armistead's Brigade, to which our regiment belonged, were the first troops to reach the immediate vicinity of Malvern Hill, arriving there at 10 A. M. Tuesday, July 1st, below them was our own gallant regiment forming a line by itself; below us was Mahone's brigade and other forces—near us were Generals Magruder, Cobb, Wright and Armistead. The day was fast declining. The deep shade of the majestic trees with which the valley was filled and the smoke of the enemy's guns brought on twilight dimnesr of the artillery, arose and rushed forward. Then Wright repeats the order to his brigade, and as quick as thought his men spring forward. Then came from General Armistead: Ninth Virginia, charge! The men arose with a shout—a joyous shout that rose above the din of battle and with a passionate enthusiasm we rushed forward. Da
James Francis Crocker (search for this): chapter 1.23
ll. Gettysburg—Pickett's charge. Addresses by James F. Crocker, before Stonewall camp Confederate Veterans, Portsmouestry dating to the settlement of Ould Virginia. James Francis Crocker, the second son of James and Frances Hill (Woodley) Crocker, was born January 5th, 1828; was graduated from Pennsylvania College, at Gettysburg, in the class of 1850, and was iession 1855-6; became a member of the law firm of Godwin & Crocker, Portsmouth, Va., in 1856, and continued in successful prarts of the cities of Norfolk, and of Portsmouth, Va. Judge Crocker resigned in 1906. As Adjutant of the Ninth Virginia Hon. R. S. Thomas is the second son of the mother of Judge Crocker, by her second marriage with James Thomas, and as Misteon who know well why they should love him, writes: His (Judge Crocker's) father died six months after he was born, and my fat The addresses here printed are from revised copies by Judge Crocker. For a graphic account of the battle of Malvern Hill
James Thomas (search for this): chapter 1.23
e Ninth Virginia Infantry he was severely wounded at the battle of Malvern Hill; wounded and taken prisoner at Gettysburg, and sent first to David's Island, N. Y., and later to Johnson's Island. By his comrades of the trying days of the momentous struggle of the South, he is warmly beloved for admirably exemplified traits, nor is he less regarded universally in his honorable civil career. Hon. R. S. Thomas is the second son of the mother of Judge Crocker, by her second marriage with James Thomas, and as Mister Dick, as he is familiarly called by those of his section who know well why they should love him, writes: His (Judge Crocker's) father died six months after he was born, and my father died some four years after my birth. My brother is nine years older than I am, and he has always been as a father to me, taking me by the hand to mould and shape my character and life. The addresses here printed are from revised copies by Judge Crocker. For a graphic account of the battl
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