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Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.33
to the major-general commanding, and was directed by him to discontinue the attack. Accordingly, at ten A. M. I withdrew my troops and occupied the line of works in front of the Landrum House. General Hancock, page 361 of Records, says: May 17th, 1864, 8 A. M., Tyler's division, about 8,000 strong, mostly heavy artillery joined the Second corps, which will reinforce us sufficiently to make up our losses at the Wilderness, the Po, and Spotsylvania. The division massed near the Fredericksburg road. No movement of the Second corps until dark, when we marched back to the works we had captured on the 12th instant, at which point it is determined again to assault the enemy to-morrow morning. At 4:10 A. M. Barlow's and Gibbon's divisions having been formed in front of the captured works moved forward to assail the enemy in the lines he had occupied after the battle at this point on the 12th. Tyler's division in reserve in rifle pits running from the Landrum House to the Sa
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.33
thouse that the distinct points of the address may be clearly brought forth, without confusion or mixing with those of other dates. After the battles of the Wilderness, the army of the Potomac, under General Grant, moved to the left towards Spotsylvania. The army of Northern Virginia, under General Lee, also moved and confronted the Northern army, and, on the 8th of May, had an engagement with it near Spotsylvania Courthouse. On the 10th of May portions of the Confederate lines were attacke Hancock, page 361 of Records, says: May 17th, 1864, 8 A. M., Tyler's division, about 8,000 strong, mostly heavy artillery joined the Second corps, which will reinforce us sufficiently to make up our losses at the Wilderness, the Po, and Spotsylvania. The division massed near the Fredericksburg road. No movement of the Second corps until dark, when we marched back to the works we had captured on the 12th instant, at which point it is determined again to assault the enemy to-morrow morn
Ny River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.33
oldiers. It is doubtful if the courage and the endurance of any soldiers in any army was surpassed by that of the Confederate soldier, and his example, either in attack or resistance, is not surpassed by the armies of the world, impelled as he was by the purest patriotism under unexampled Christian leaders to do his duty, with none of that fatalism characterizing the reckless fighting of Mohammedans, Hindoos and Japanese. The field of this engagement is embraced between the Po and the Ny rivers, branches of the Mattapony, a rolling, undulating, wellwooded country, intersected by small branches from these streams, which are sometimes low and marshy. The map herewith presented is an enlarged one, taken from one of the War Record's office, and shows, marked in red and black, the lines of the works occupied by the troops of both armies engaged in the several battles in this neighborhood. The positions of the armies on May 18th, 1864, were as follows: Confederate Army. Longstr
A. E. Burnside (search for this): chapter 1.33
sion in reserve in rifle pits running from the Landrum House to the Salient, Birney's division still remaining with General Burnside. Gibbon's and Barlow's divisions now traversed the same ground which we had fought so desperately on six days since, where we remained until withdrawn by orders. In this engagement our loss was heavy and most from artillery. General A. E. Burnside, pages 910 and 911 of Records, says: On the morning of the 18th (May, 1864), a general attack was made on the enewell supported by the artillery, particularly by the batteries of General Wilcox's division. General J. H. Ledlie, of Burnside's corps, pages 917 and 918, of Records, says: On the 18th of May (1864), I received orders to advance upon and feel thefrom the enemy. The officers and men behaved with great gallantry, and deserve much credit. General R. B. Potter, of Burnside's Corps, page 920 of Record, says: The usual skirmishing and artillery fire continued till the morning of the 18th (May
, Chief Artillery, Warren's Corps, page 644 of Records, says: May 18, 1864, Second and Sixth Corps having returned to the right of the general line, and so uncovered the left, Hart's, Bigelow's and Walcott's batteries of light 12 pounders were posted in the neighborhood of the Anderson house to protect that flank, should the enemy attack there. Before daylight Rittenhouse's battery was pushed forward on the pike to our advanced works, about 1,400 yards from the court-house, and was joined by Taft's (Fifth New York Independent) battery of six 20 pounder Parrott's, which had temporarily joined the brigade the night before and Sheldon's battery, making 14 guns, under command of Major Fitzhugh. At the same time Captain Cooper, with his own, Breck's and Phillips' batteries, making 12 three-inch guns, was posted on a sharp knoll to the front, and some 400 yards to the left of Major Fitzhugh's line, making an angle of about 60 degrees with it. The position of all these batteries was excelle
dience to orders from General Gibbon, I withdrew to the second line of intrenchments. Colonel John C. Tidball, Chief Artillery, Hancock's corps, page 510 of Records, says: May 18th moved from Harris' house to the deserted house, and Roder, Ames and Ricketts to Landrum's. Sent Edgell's battery to Colonel Tompkins. Brown, Roder and Ames, in the first line, silenced rebel battery; 12 M. still in position. Clark and Ricketts moved down to works on extreme right. Edgell already there with Birneys's division. General G. K. Warren, page 542 of Records, says: May 18, 1864, whole army had moved off to our right to make an assault on the enemy, and I commenced to cannonade at daylight with 26 guns, as a diversion. This occasioned a brisk artillery duel between myself and Hill's Corps. Our forces found the enemy prepared and strongly posted on the right, and made no serious attack. Colonel Charles S. Wainwright, Chief Artillery, Warren's Corps, page 644 of Records, says: May 18, 1
James Longstreet (search for this): chapter 1.33
rivers, branches of the Mattapony, a rolling, undulating, wellwooded country, intersected by small branches from these streams, which are sometimes low and marshy. The map herewith presented is an enlarged one, taken from one of the War Record's office, and shows, marked in red and black, the lines of the works occupied by the troops of both armies engaged in the several battles in this neighborhood. The positions of the armies on May 18th, 1864, were as follows: Confederate Army. Longstreet's First Corps (Anderson commanding), on the extreme Confederate right, composed of: Kershaw's Division, Field's Division, Pickett's Division (absent), with the artillery of this corps. Not in action as far as known. Hill's Third Corps (Early commanding), in centre on left of Anderson, composed of: Anderson's Division, Heth's Division, Wilcox's Division, with the artillery of this corps. Infantry not in action, but Third Corps guns replying to Warren's. Ewell's Second Corps, n
Richard Stoddard Ewell (search for this): chapter 1.33
Anderson's Division, Heth's Division, Wilcox's Division, with the artillery of this corps. Infantry not in action, but Third Corps guns replying to Warren's. Ewell's Second Corps, next on the extreme Confederate left, composed of: Early's (Gordon) Division, perhaps slightly; Johnson's Division, partly in action; Rodes' Divorts. That this was a matured plan, settled upon by Generals Grant and Meade, and attempted in execution in a determined manner to carry the Confederate works on Ewell's front, the following quotations from the published official records fully establish: Major-General Humphrey's, Chief of Staff to General Meade, page—of his bon, our loss was nothing, and this was accomplished against a force of 12,000 picked infantry by twenty-nine pieces of artillery alone, but well handled. General R. S. Ewell, page 1073 of Records, says: As it was unadvisable to continue efforts to retake the salient with the force at my command, a new line was laid out dur
y), slightly, with the artillery of this corps. Firing in a desultory manner from the works, with infantry, but with 29 guns vigorously in action also firing from works, and as follows; Guns. Second Howitzers (Jones'), Third Howitzers (Smith's), Powhatan Artillery (Dance's), Salem Artillery (Griffin's)15 Orange Artillery (Fry's), with men of other batteries; Staunton Artillery (Garber's), with men of other batteries8 Guns from either Braxton or Nelson6 — 29 Federal Army. Wthe left and the balance of the brigade on the right under cover of the woods. The enemy continued to shell both positions for an hour, the brigade and the lines in support losing many men and officers therefrom. At 8 o'clock the brigade of Colonel Smith, of the Third Division formed on the right. At 9 o'clock a staff officer of the division commander came for the first time to learn the situation of affairs, to whom I represented the impracticability of a farther advance. A short time aft
H. B. McKeen (search for this): chapter 1.33
lonel Matthew Murphy, Sixty-ninth regiment, New York National Guard Artillery, commanding, had the day before joined the army and been assigned to my division as the Fourth brigade, and Col. Thomas S. Smyth, First Delaware Volunteers, and Colonel H. B. McKeen, Eighty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, reported to me for duty, and were assigned to the command of the Third and First brigades respectively. The division was formed in two lines, the first line composed of McKeen's and Murphy's brigadesMcKeen's and Murphy's brigades (First and Fourth) in line of battle connecting with Barlow's division on the left and the Sixth corps on the right, and supported by the second line. Owen's and Smyth's brigades (Second and Third) formed in line of battalions en masse. Directly in front of the centre of my line was a thick, heavy wood, which prevented any considerable portion of the division from being seen from any one point. The troops moved to the assault at 4:30 A. M., and gallantly carried some of the enemy's works in
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