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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
he Spotsylvania fight told by Major Robert Hunter. Major Robert W. Hunter is one of those soldiers of Virginia and the Confederacy to whose name may be written from Manassas to Appomattox. In the first battle he was in the Second Virginia Infantry of the Stonewall Brigade, and in the closing scene at Appomattox was on the staff of Major-General John B. Gordon, of Georgia, who afterwards became the successor of Jackson, Ewell and Early as commander of the Second Corps. He was in Jackson's and in Early's Valley campaigns alike, and in all the great battles in which the famous Second Corps participated. Did he write his reminiscences, as it is hoped he may, there is no man living who could relate more of the vivid scenes of the wondrous story of the Army of Northern Virginia. Enclosed is an account taken from his lips of the Bloody Angle of Spotsylvania, on the 12th of May. It is a finality on the question which sometimes has been raised by the uninformed with respect t
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
he Wilderness, on the 5th and 6th of May. On the 8th of May, A. P. Hill being sick, Major-General Early was put in command of his corps. General Stafford, of Louisiana, having been killed, the two Louisiana brigades of Hays and Stafford, both of which were small, were consolidated under General Harry T. Hays. He was wounded onLouisiana brigades of Hays and Stafford, both of which were small, were consolidated under General Harry T. Hays. He was wounded on May 10th, and they were now at Spotsylvania, under Colonel Zebulon York. R. D. Johnson's North Carolina brigade had been assigned to Early's division, and on May 6th and on the 12th of May the two divisions of Early and Johnson were composed as follows: (1) Early's old division, under Gordon, consisted of Pegram's Virginia bn line. In half an hour we had succeeded in getting together some three or four hundred men, with officers here and there of various ranks. There were ten (10) Louisiana regiments (fragments), two (2) North Carolina and eight (8) Virginia regiments in Johnson's division, and the remnants of these, which had not been captured, wer
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
Major-General Johnson at Spotsylvania. From the times-dispatch, November 26, 1905. The Confederate General who met bayonets of enemy with a cane. Wonderful fighting then. Graphic story of the Spotsylvania fight told by Major Robert Hun wondrous story of the Army of Northern Virginia. Enclosed is an account taken from his lips of the Bloody Angle of Spotsylvania, on the 12th of May. It is a finality on the question which sometimes has been raised by the uninformed with respect in Watkins Leigh, his predecessor, was killed. Gallantly did he serve throughout the war, and on that terrific day at Spotsylvania, which he graphically recounts, Major-General Edward Johnson (Old Alleghany, as the soldiers called him, on account of of which were small, were consolidated under General Harry T. Hays. He was wounded on May 10th, and they were now at Spotsylvania, under Colonel Zebulon York. R. D. Johnson's North Carolina brigade had been assigned to Early's division, and on M
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
el C. A. Evans, and the North Carolina brigade of four regiments, under Brigadier-General R. D. Johnson; in all, fifteen regiments. (2) Major-General Edward Johnson's division consisted of Brigadier-General Geo. H. Steuart's brigade of two North Carolina and three Virginia regiments; John M. Jones' old brigade (general having been killed May 5th), under Colonel V. A. Witcher, which consisted of six Virginia regiments, and also of Brigadier-General Harry T. Hays' consolidated brigade of ten ree men who had escaped capture to form in line. In half an hour we had succeeded in getting together some three or four hundred men, with officers here and there of various ranks. There were ten (10) Louisiana regiments (fragments), two (2) North Carolina and eight (8) Virginia regiments in Johnson's division, and the remnants of these, which had not been captured, were intermingled together when reformed. They made a pretty good regiment ready for battle. I took command of them and marched
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
ith a cane. Wonderful fighting then. Graphic story of the Spotsylvania fight told by Major Robert Hunter. Major Robert W. Hunter is one of those soldiers of Virginia and the Confederacy to whose name may be written from Manassas to Appomattox. In the first battle he was in the Second Virginia Infantry of the Stonewall Brigade, and in the closing scene at Appomattox was on the staff of Major-General John B. Gordon, of Georgia, who afterwards became the successor of Jackson, Ewell Appomattox was on the staff of Major-General John B. Gordon, of Georgia, who afterwards became the successor of Jackson, Ewell and Early as commander of the Second Corps. He was in Jackson's and in Early's Valley campaigns alike, and in all the great battles in which the famous Second Corps participated. Did he write his reminiscences, as it is hoped he may, there is no man living who could relate more of the vivid scenes of the wondrous story of the Army of Northern Virginia. Enclosed is an account taken from his lips of the Bloody Angle of Spotsylvania, on the 12th of May. It is a finality on the question whic
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
5. The Confederate General who met bayonets of enemy with a cane. Wonderful fighting then. Graphic story of the Spotsylvania fight told by Major Robert Hunter. Major Robert W. Hunter is one of those soldiers of Virginia and the Confederacy to whose name may be written from Manassas to Appomattox. In the first battle he was in the Second Virginia Infantry of the Stonewall Brigade, and in the closing scene at Appomattox was on the staff of Major-General John B. Gordon, of Georgia, who afterwards became the successor of Jackson, Ewell and Early as commander of the Second Corps. He was in Jackson's and in Early's Valley campaigns alike, and in all the great battles in which the famous Second Corps participated. Did he write his reminiscences, as it is hoped he may, there is no man living who could relate more of the vivid scenes of the wondrous story of the Army of Northern Virginia. Enclosed is an account taken from his lips of the Bloody Angle of Spotsylvania
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
ts here and there, and there was instant expectation of a coming assault. The first thing we saw was a mass of men—indistinctly visible through the fog—moving in front of our position. Our left was the Stonewall Brigade, under General J. A. Walker. Then came the Louisianians of Hays and Stafford's brigades under Colonel Zebulon York; then John M. Jones' old brigade under Colonel V. A. Witcher, and then the right under Brigadier General George H. Steuart. The massing men were in front of York and Witcher. General Johnson ordered me to tell Steuart to press on to his left close to Witcher, and then to hurry up the artillery. I ran on foot rapidly, called for General Steuart, and not finding him instantly, I myself gave the officers and troops directions to close to the left. It was then that I saw our artillery coming in position, and the fire broke out with a rush of the enemy upon our ranks. The artillery I met was the battery of Captain William P. Carter, brother of Colonel
Evan (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
ich had Gordon's old brigade, under Colonel C. A. Evans, on our left. We soon found General Gordon, who was forming his men, with a skirmish line in front, and the regiments were aligning behind them. General Lee met Gordon in front of Pegram's brigade, and then there was the scene of Lee to the rear, which has been so often described, Gordon exhorting and the men clamoring for General Lee to go back. As Lee retired through Gordon's line Pegram's Virginia brigade, and both that brigade and Evan's also moved forward. Major Hunter in command. General Lee then said to me: Major Hunter, collect together the men of Johnson's division and report to General Gordon. I immediately called for Johnson's men who were scattered about the valley, Captain Virginius Dabney, of General Johnson's Staff, assisting me. I saw Captain Harman, of the Second Virginia Infantry, and other officers, who actively exerted themselves to get the men who had escaped capture to form in line. In half an hou
Robert W. Hunter (search for this): chapter 1.34
the Spotsylvania fight told by Major Robert Hunter. Major Robert W. Hunter is one of those soldiers of Virginia and the Confederacy toich resulted, and his report shows it; but I will not anticipate Major Hunter's story. He became adjutant-general of Johnson's division shorthis notable feats of arms entitled him. His adjutant-general, Major Hunter, who is as accomplished with the pen, as with the sword, has dosix regiments, many of which were remnants. John W. Daniel. Major Hunter's story. On the night of May 11th, 1864, Major-General Edbrigade, and both that brigade and Evan's also moved forward. Major Hunter in command. General Lee then said to me: Major Hunter, collecMajor Hunter, collect together the men of Johnson's division and report to General Gordon. I immediately called for Johnson's men who were scattered about the vard to General Gordon's assistance, reporting to him for duty. Robert W. Hunter, Major and Assistant Adjutant of Major-General Edward Johnson
V. A. Witcher (search for this): chapter 1.34
rginia regiments; John M. Jones' old brigade (general having been killed May 5th), under Colonel V. A. Witcher, which consisted of six Virginia regiments, and also of Brigadier-General Harry T. Hays'em in person, viz: to Brigadier General J. A. Walker, Brigadier General George H. Steuart, Col. V. A. Witcher, and Colonel Zebulon York. Each one did sign it in acknowedgement of receipt, and it enjond Stafford's brigades under Colonel Zebulon York; then John M. Jones' old brigade under Colonel V. A. Witcher, and then the right under Brigadier General George H. Steuart. The massing men were in front of York and Witcher. General Johnson ordered me to tell Steuart to press on to his left close to Witcher, and then to hurry up the artillery. I ran on foot rapidly, called for General SteuartWitcher, and then to hurry up the artillery. I ran on foot rapidly, called for General Steuart, and not finding him instantly, I myself gave the officers and troops directions to close to the left. It was then that I saw our artillery coming in position, and the fire broke out with a rush of
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