hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Fitzhugh Lee 208 2 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 188 0 Browse Search
1862 AD 159 159 Browse Search
Edward Johnson 139 13 Browse Search
James Longstreet 135 1 Browse Search
J. A. Early 121 1 Browse Search
Robert E. Rodes 121 3 Browse Search
Richard Stoddard Ewell 121 3 Browse Search
1863 AD 109 109 Browse Search
Alabama (Alabama, United States) 106 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 171 total hits in 60 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
South River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
ttle on Saturday he replied that they had lost five thousand men. While we were talking a remarkably handsome Yankee general in the crowd came near us. I asked General Potter who he was, and was informed that he was General Ferrero, who commanded the negro troops. I said: I have some of his papers which I captured in the fort, and showed them to General Potter. He then said: Let me call him up and introduce him, and we will show him the papers and guy him. I replied, however, that we down South were not in the habit of recognizing as our social equals those who associated with negroes. He then asked me to give him some of Ferrero's papers. He wanted them for a purpose. I did so. The others I kept, and they are now lying before me as I write. He also asked me to point out to him some of our generals, several of whom were then standing on the embankment of the wrecked fort. (I noticed that none of our generals except Saunders, who had charge of affairs, came over and mingled w
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
f Crater. From the times-dispatch, October 22, 1905. Charge of Wilcox's old brigade under General Saunders, of Mahone's division. Story of a participant. One among the most wonderful fights in the history of the wars. General Henderson, of the English army, who is the celebrated author of the life of Stonewall Jackson, says that, contemporaneous accounts are the life of history. I have the pleasure of sending you a story admirably told by Captain John C. Featherston, of Lynchburg, who is so well and favorable known throughout the State, as soldier, legislator and citizen, of the part taken in the battles of the Crater by Wilcox's old brigade of Mahone's division, under General J. C. C. Saunders. He has shown me the letters which he wrote in the trenches on August 1st and August 2d, while yet the contending forces confronted each other on the field of battle. One of them is written on the paper of the United States Christian Commission, of Washington, which was
Vesuvius (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
h bayonets as the quills of the fretful porcupine. As soon as we became visible the infantry and the artillery opened on us a most destructive fire, then the command Charge rang out along the line, and on we went like a terrible avalanche and as fast as possible, no man being permitted to fire until he reached the fort. In the fort the enemy were crowded, but undaunted by numbers, our boys commenced scaling the sides of the fort. The enemy kept up such a fire that it seemed like a second Vesuvius belching forth its fire. Then came the tug of war. The enemy have shouted: No quarters! We then gave them what they justly deserved. There we were on one side of the walls of the fort and the Yankees on the other. The fight was the bloodiest of the war considering the numbers engaged. We fought with muskets, with bayonets, with rocks, and even with clods of dirt. The fight lasted in this manner for near half an hour, when they called for quarters, and we being sickened by the slaugh
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
er General J. C. C. Saunders. He has shown me the letters which he wrote in the trenches on August 1st and August 2d, while yet the contending forces confronted each other on the field of battle. One of them is written on the paper of the United States Christian Commission, of Washington, which was part of the captured spoil of the battle, and these letters addressed to his wife have the flavor of the real thing. When the Alabama Brigade, under Saunders, was put in by Mahone at the rightured it, but it was a dear business for him. Our entire loss, 800 men; their loss ,5,000) five thousand. I have never seen such slaughter since the war commenced. I will write more. Your affectionate husband, J. C. Featherston. United States Christian commission, 500 H. Street, Washington, D. C. Camp Ninth Alabama Regiment, near Petersburg, Aug. 2, 1864. My Dear Wife.—I wrote you a note yesterday while in our recaptured fortifications, informing you that I was not killed in ou
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
t the enemy's main line, as did our artillery, and the enemy's infantry and artillery from all sides opened upon us. Into the mouth of hell charged the six hundred. On we went, as it seemed to us, literally into the mouth of hell. When we got to the walls of the fort we dropped on the ground to get the men in order and let them get their breath. While waiting we could hear the Yankee officers in the fort trying to encourage their men, telling them among other things to remember Fort Pillow. (In that fort Forrest's men had found whites and negroes together. History tells what they did for them.) Then commenced a novel method of fighting. There was quite a number of abandoned muskets, with bayonets on them, lying on the ground around the fort. Our men began pitching them over the embankment, bayonets foremost, trying to harpoon the men inside, and both sides threw over cannon balls and fragments of shells and earth, which by the impact of the explosion had been pressed as ha
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
as will be noticed by the heading and date was written on Confederate paper, while I was in the fort, to inform her that I survived the battle. The other was written on Yankee paper letter headed, U. S. Christian Commission, 500 H street, Washington, D. C., immediately after we had been withdrawn and returned to our former position, where times were easier, in which I gave her an account of the battle. I will also give some extracts from the Richmond Dispatch, giving an account of the partentire loss, 800 men; their loss ,5,000) five thousand. I have never seen such slaughter since the war commenced. I will write more. Your affectionate husband, J. C. Featherston. United States Christian commission, 500 H. Street, Washington, D. C. Camp Ninth Alabama Regiment, near Petersburg, Aug. 2, 1864. My Dear Wife.—I wrote you a note yesterday while in our recaptured fortifications, informing you that I was not killed in our desperate fight on Saturday, the 30th ultimo, but g
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
ommenced a severe cannonade by the Yankees, which was promptly replied to by the Confederate artillery. Preparation for the counter attack. Soon orders were received for two of our brigades to move to the point of attack. The Virginia and Georgia brigades, being on the right of the division, were withdrawn from the works in such a manner as not to be seen by the enemy who were intrenched in strong force immediately in our front, and dispatched as directed. This occurred about 8 or 9 o'cm to give way, and before the smoke from the explosion cleared away, the enemy, having their infantry massed, hurled brigade after brigade through the breach thus effected, until the entire place was alive with them. Three brigades (Wright's Georgia, Mahone's Virginia and Saunders' Alabama [Wilcox's old], of our [Mahone's] division) were ordered to move down quickly and retake the works at all hazards. We moved down and took our position in a little ravine in front of the works held by the
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
time you get down. I have often since wished I had taken his name and regiment, for he was truly a rough diamond, a brave fellow. He went in the charge with us, but I do not know whether he survived it or not. I never saw him again. The Alabama brigade. This brigade was composed of the 8th Alabama, Captain M. W. Mordecai, commanding; 9th Alabama, Lieutenant-Colonel J. H. King, commanding; 10th Alabama, Captain W. L. Brewster, commanding; 11th Alabama, Lieutenant-Colonel George P. Tathe explosion cleared away, the enemy, having their infantry massed, hurled brigade after brigade through the breach thus effected, until the entire place was alive with them. Three brigades (Wright's Georgia, Mahone's Virginia and Saunders' Alabama [Wilcox's old], of our [Mahone's] division) were ordered to move down quickly and retake the works at all hazards. We moved down and took our position in a little ravine in front of the works held by the enemy. The artillery from both sides wa
Waco (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
Fort, the last infantry reserve of Lee was casting the die of fate, and Lee himself watched the movements of Mahone's division, and of his last brigade with the indescribable feeling that a commander must possess when playing his piece on the checker-board of war, for at that time a considerable portion of his forces was on the north side of the James, and the Petersburg line was in great attenuation. Captain George Clark, the assistant adjutant-general of the brigade, who now lives at Waco, Tex., relates in a letter to Captain Featherston, which I have seen, that he went along the line of the brigade and told the privates that General Saunders had been informed by General Lee that the brigade was his last available reserve, and unless they recaptured the works he intended to reform it in person, and lead it. Well, said one of the men, if the old man comes down here, we will tie him to a sapling while we make the fight. The gallant officer who has kindly furnished this valuable
George P. Tayloe (search for this): chapter 1.38
t ready by the time you get down. I have often since wished I had taken his name and regiment, for he was truly a rough diamond, a brave fellow. He went in the charge with us, but I do not know whether he survived it or not. I never saw him again. The Alabama brigade. This brigade was composed of the 8th Alabama, Captain M. W. Mordecai, commanding; 9th Alabama, Lieutenant-Colonel J. H. King, commanding; 10th Alabama, Captain W. L. Brewster, commanding; 11th Alabama, Lieutenant-Colonel George P. Tayloe, commanding; 14th Alabama, Captain Elias Folk, commanding. This (Wilcox's old brigade) was commanded and led in this battle by the gallant and intrepid Brigadier-General J. C. C. Saunders, with Captain George Clark, assistant adjutant-general, another brave officer. The 9th Alabama being on the right of the brigade, was in front as we ascended the ravine or depression to form line of battle. I copy from the Petersburg Express the names of the officers who commanded the
1 2 3 4 5 6