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Cedar Mountain (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
the strict States' Right school, He yielded paramount allegiance to his mother State, And maintained, with fearless and impassioned eloquence, In the Congress of the United States the Sovereignty of Virginia, When the storm of war burst, His voice was in his sword. Third face: Though past threescore, he entered the military service As Colonel of Virginia Infantry, And rose by sheer merit to the rank of Major-General. At First Manassas, Seven Pines, the Seven Days Battle, Cedar Mountain, Second Manassas, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. His fiery, yet cheerful courage was everywhere conspicuous, And the only fault imputed to him by his superior was A too reckless exposure of his person, Thrice wounded at Sharpsburg, he refused to leave the field, And remained in command of his regiment until the end of that sanguinary engagement. Fourth face: Called from the army to guide again the destinies of this Commonwealth during 1864-65 He d
Lewisburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
houlder. With his left hand he is in the act of casting the cloak from his person. This pose was selected from several drawings from which a small model was made. This was approved by the parties in interest and several friends who were asked to inspect it, among them Colonel Cutshaw and Mayor McCarthy. The large figure, from the design, was modeled by William Sievers, of New York, formerly of Richmond. He was first a scholar and subsequently instructor in modeling in the Mechanics' Institute. Mr. Siever's afterwards studied in the schools of Rome. His work on the figure thoroughly represents the spirit of the design and is done with bold technique. W. Cary Sheppard designed the pedestal, which was cut and erected by Albert Netherwood. Mr. Sheppard's other work in the city is the Libby Hill monument, Howitzer and A. P. Hill. Within the last two years he has done soldiers' monuments for Lewisburg, W. Va., and Louisa, Va., the latter being a high relief lifesize figure.
Hollywood (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
it throng. Not gold, but only men can make A nation great and strong; Men who for truth and honor's sake Hold still and suffer long. Brave men, who work while others sleep, Who dare when others sigh; They build a nation's pillars deep, And lift it to the sky. At the close of the Governor's words a heavy salute was fired by the military escort, and with a crash of music the ceremonies were brought to a close, and the military, veterans, escort, etc., reformed in column and proceeded to Hollywood to attend the memorial exercises there. Monument inscriptions. The figure of Governor Smith stands on a heavy pedestal surrounded by a swinging chain fence. On the several sides of the base are the following inscriptions: front face: William Smith. Virginia. Born Sept. 6, 1797. Died May 18, 1887. 1836-40 1841-2 Member of Virginia Senate. 1846-49 Governor of Virginia. 1841-3 1853-1861 Member of United States Congress. 1861-62 Member of Confederate States Congress. 1861-2 Col
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
ry genius, this regiment soon attained a fame exceeded by none of the great Army of Northern Virginia. In the night assault at Fairfax Courthouse, almost the first of the war, he exhibited a coolness, a courage, a resourcefulness that made a profound impression at the time and marked him as one eminently fitted for military command and responsibility. At the battle of First Manassas, rallying around his regiment other troops that were disorganized and retreating, he stationed himself on Jackson's left, fought heroically and kept his line unbroken in all the vicissitudes of that fierce and terrific conflict. Subsequently, at Seven Pines, he attained yet loftier heights of courage and endurance. The figure of this old hero, waving his flag and with sunny smile leading his troops against the enemy under a murderous fire that wounded and killed more than half will live in the hearts of all Virginians as long as courage and gallantry are cherished. The annals of war can scarcely fur
Capitol (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
County, grandniece of the old governor, gently pulled the unveiling rope, and the heavy hood fell from the statue, leaving the proud figure of the Virginian of Virginians standing alone, grasping his sword and casting off his cloak, advancing to the aid of his State and country. At the sight of the statue thus exposed to the public view for the first time, the audience burst into long and enthusiastic applause, the thunder of their clapping and cheering being heard for squares around the capitol. Address of Governor Swanson accepting. The statue had been presented, and all that remained was its acceptance by the State. Upon Governor Swanson the duty fell, and raising his hand to quiet the applause and command attention, he said: Judge Keith and Fellow-Citizens. By the authority vested in me as Governor and in behalf of the people of this Commonwealth, I gladly and gratefully accept this gift. It is fitting that the statue erected to commemorate the achievements of t
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
irginia. At Manassas, Williamsburg, Seven Pines, the seven days of battle around Richmond, at Sharpsburg, at Gettysburg, he displayed upon greater and bloodier fields the high soldierly qualities of him seize a fallen banner and bear it to the front, heedless of a storm of shot and shell; at Sharpsburg all day upon the perilous edge of the fiercest battle of the war, he displayed the highest coucan scarcely furnish a more striking and picturesque scene of valor and daring. But it is at Sharpsburg that we love and admire him most. He was assigned a critical position in that terrible battlel. At First Manassas, Seven Pines, the Seven Days Battle, Cedar Mountain, Second Manassas, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. His fiery, yet cheerful courage was everywhmputed to him by his superior was A too reckless exposure of his person, Thrice wounded at Sharpsburg, he refused to leave the field, And remained in command of his regiment until the end of that
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
s were bared and bowed as the veteran chaplain invoked the blessing of God and offered thanks for the past blessings lavished on Richmond, the South and the United States. Address of Judge James Keith. Following the prayer, Judge James Keith, who was to deliver the presentation address, stepped to the front of the platform, and in the following terms presented the statue to the Commonwealth of Virginia: Fellow-citizens of the Commonwealth of Virginia. A distinguished son of Massachusetts has said of the Virginia of the Revolutionary period, that We must go back to Athens to find another instance of a society so small in number and yet capable of such an outburst of ability and force. Into this society, in the County of King George, on 6th of September, 1797, was born William Smith. The public opinion of the day was dominated by the sentiments which had caused the War of Independence and carried it to a successful conclusion. From his earliest infancy, his mind was
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
William Smith, Governor of Virginia, and Major-General C. S. Army, hero and patriot. Unveiling of the statue to, in the capital Square, Richmond, Virginia, May 30, 1906. Ceremonies incident thereon. Presented by Judge James Keith, President of the Court of Appeals of Virginia, and accepted by Governor Claude A. Swanson in appealing addresses. The ceremonies relating to the unveiling of the Smith monument began this afternoon at 2.30 o'clock, when, under instructions of the chief marshal, the mounted escort and militia and veterans, assembled between Fifth and Seventh Streets, in Grace Street, moved East to the Capital Square, the military escort swinging in through the Grace Street gate, and the occupants of the carriages and dismounted horsemen moving to Capital Street and entering from that gate. The speaker's stand was already crowded with State and city officials and invited guests. Gradually the hum of many voices ceased, and as Chaplain J. William Jones ra
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
paramount allegiance to his mother State, And maintained, with fearless and impassioned eloquence, In the Congress of the United States the Sovereignty of Virginia, When the storm of war burst, His voice was in his sword. Third face: Though past threescore, he entered the military service As Colonel of Virginia Infantry, And rose by sheer merit to the rank of Major-General. At First Manassas, Seven Pines, the Seven Days Battle, Cedar Mountain, Second Manassas, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. His fiery, yet cheerful courage was everywhere conspicuous, And the only fault imputed to him by his superior was A too reckless exposure of his person, Thrice wounded at Sharpsburg, he refused to leave the field, And remained in command of his regiment until the end of that sanguinary engagement. Fourth face: Called from the army to guide again the destinies of this Commonwealth during 1864-65 He displayed such energy, resource and unshaken r
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.24
of posterity and anticipates its judgment, to make a just award and to assign to us our due share in the glory of that mighty struggle. For that award we shall wait with serene confidence, and with it we shall be content, certain of this at last, that there is enough and to spare for all. We next hear of Governor Smith as colonel of the Forty-ninty Virginia Infantry at Manassas. To follow his career in detail would be to give the story of the Army of Northern Virginia. At Manassas, Williamsburg, Seven Pines, the seven days of battle around Richmond, at Sharpsburg, at Gettysburg, he displayed upon greater and bloodier fields the high soldierly qualities of which he gave promise and earnest at Fairfax Courthouse. At Seven Pines we see him seize a fallen banner and bear it to the front, heedless of a storm of shot and shell; at Sharpsburg all day upon the perilous edge of the fiercest battle of the war, he displayed the highest courage and by his example lifted his men above all f
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