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Amelia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
in the battery at the time of the last operations, and had been using mortars at Fort Harrison. We left Fort Harrison in the night and crossed Mayo's Bridge at daylight next morning, the day the enemy took possession of Richmond. We were on foot, and eight or ten mortars were carried along with us in wagons. We were attached to Lieutenant-Colonel Haskell's artillery battalion. We had neither swords nor muskets. As we progressed on our march, we crossed the river near Flat Creek, in Amelia county, when a man in Confederate uniform rode up to Haskell's battalion and told them to take the road leading to Paineville. He then rode off. Attacked from ambush. As we got nearer Flat Creek a body of Federal cavalry suddenly dashed from the front with a battalion yelling and shooting. There were several hundred of them. I did not then have time to count. We had no infantry support, and one gun of Ramsey's battery, which had been gotten into position to fire, was run over and capt
Amherst (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
ing put in charge of Lieutenant Massie and his ten men, were turned over by him in a short time after the surrender to the officer and men from whom they were taken. Lieutenant Massie is an active and vigorous man, enjoying excellent health at his home in Amherst County. Captain Lampkin, a gigantic grenadier, who would have been picked out on sight by Frederick the Great for one of his guards, and who made a great name while gallantly commanding his guns in battle, is still living in Amherst, and he and Lieutenant Massie still look as if they would hear the bugle call of battle with relish and satisfaction. Jno. W. Daniel. My name is Fletcher T. Massie, and I was a second lieutenant in Lampkin's battery of artillery, which was organized in Nelson county, Va. In the retreat from Petersburg the men of the battery, under Captain Lampkin, were near Fort Harrison, on the north side of the James. We had nearly a hundred men in the battery at the time of the last operations,
Nelson (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
y. Captain Lampkin, a gigantic grenadier, who would have been picked out on sight by Frederick the Great for one of his guards, and who made a great name while gallantly commanding his guns in battle, is still living in Amherst, and he and Lieutenant Massie still look as if they would hear the bugle call of battle with relish and satisfaction. Jno. W. Daniel. My name is Fletcher T. Massie, and I was a second lieutenant in Lampkin's battery of artillery, which was organized in Nelson county, Va. In the retreat from Petersburg the men of the battery, under Captain Lampkin, were near Fort Harrison, on the north side of the James. We had nearly a hundred men in the battery at the time of the last operations, and had been using mortars at Fort Harrison. We left Fort Harrison in the night and crossed Mayo's Bridge at daylight next morning, the day the enemy took possession of Richmond. We were on foot, and eight or ten mortars were carried along with us in wagons. We were at
Amherst county (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
go farther into this question now, and it suffices to remark that this account of Lieutenant Massie is valuable, so far as it goes, in fixing the circumstances under which the gun and caisson were brought into Lee's lines, and that being put in charge of Lieutenant Massie and his ten men, were turned over by him in a short time after the surrender to the officer and men from whom they were taken. Lieutenant Massie is an active and vigorous man, enjoying excellent health at his home in Amherst County. Captain Lampkin, a gigantic grenadier, who would have been picked out on sight by Frederick the Great for one of his guards, and who made a great name while gallantly commanding his guns in battle, is still living in Amherst, and he and Lieutenant Massie still look as if they would hear the bugle call of battle with relish and satisfaction. Jno. W. Daniel. My name is Fletcher T. Massie, and I was a second lieutenant in Lampkin's battery of artillery, which was organized in Nel
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
From Petersburg to Appomattox. From the Times-dispatch, October 28, 1906. Lampkin's Battery of ArtillFort Harrison, on the north side of the James, to Appomattox, is by Lieutenant Fletcher T. Massie, of that splime being. We marched on together, crossing Appomattox River on a ferryboat near High Bridge, and got to Fass along the line of our subsequent march towards Appomattox. (General Lee looked as he always did, and showednd we marched about a mile farther on the road to Appomattox. I now saw a section of artillery—that is, two gmen. At nightfall we resumed our march towards Appomattox. During Saturday we were on the march, without i the evening we heard the guns of a skirmish near Appomattox. We halted about nightfall, about a mile before reaching Appomattox, and for the first time during the retreat the harness was taken off of the horses that caried Colonel Haskell's guns. Thin gray line at Appomattox. On the morning of April 9th, the day of surre
Paineville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
ry battalion. We had neither swords nor muskets. As we progressed on our march, we crossed the river near Flat Creek, in Amelia county, when a man in Confederate uniform rode up to Haskell's battalion and told them to take the road leading to Paineville. He then rode off. Attacked from ambush. As we got nearer Flat Creek a body of Federal cavalry suddenly dashed from the front with a battalion yelling and shooting. There were several hundred of them. I did not then have time to count.soon captured. I escaped to the woods, and when the affair was over I went back to the scene, where I found wagons cut down, the teams gone and ten men of my battery. I am satisfied that the man who gave the order for us to take the road to Paineville was a Yankee scout in disguise. Sergeant James F. Wood, of Lampkin's battery, saw him, after he was captured in the affair with the Yankees, and said he was undoubtedly one of them. A sight of General Lee. I told the men to supply them
Rockbridge (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
eutenant Fletcher T. Massie, of that splendid company of artillery. It is interesting in its incidents, and particularly so in the account it gives of the gun and caisson captured on the morning of surrender with their commanding officer and their men. It is shown by the report of General W. H. F. Lee, which has come to light, that two guns were captured that morning by Beale's and Robins's Brigades ot his division. In the assault General Beale was wounded, and Wilson and Walker, of Rockbridge, were killed. One of the two guns was thrown over in a ditch, as other accounts have made known. The one gun and the caisson, which were brought into Lee's lines, were each drawn by six horses. It is possible, if not, indeed, probable, that this gun and caisson were counted by some onlookers as two guns, for some accounts say that four guns were captured. It is needlessly to go farther into this question now, and it suffices to remark that this account of Lieutenant Massie is valuable,
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
ndid service of the Second Rockbridge Battery. The account below of the retreat of Lampkin's Battery from near Fort Harrison, on the north side of the James, to Appomattox, is by Lieutenant Fletcher T. Massie, of that splendid company of artiized in Nelson county, Va. In the retreat from Petersburg the men of the battery, under Captain Lampkin, were near Fort Harrison, on the north side of the James. We had nearly a hundred men in the battery at the time of the last operations, and had been using mortars at Fort Harrison. We left Fort Harrison in the night and crossed Mayo's Bridge at daylight next morning, the day the enemy took possession of Richmond. We were on foot, and eight or ten mortars were carried along with us in Fort Harrison in the night and crossed Mayo's Bridge at daylight next morning, the day the enemy took possession of Richmond. We were on foot, and eight or ten mortars were carried along with us in wagons. We were attached to Lieutenant-Colonel Haskell's artillery battalion. We had neither swords nor muskets. As we progressed on our march, we crossed the river near Flat Creek, in Amelia county, when a man in Confederate uniform rode up to H
Farmville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
ght on famous retreat. A glimpse of General Lee. Fight near Farmville and splendid service of the Second Rockbridge Battery. Thesing Appomattox River on a ferryboat near High Bridge, and got to Farmville on Thursday evening. Our rations had now given out, but a Confederate commissary at Farmville gave us a new supply, which lasted us to the end. We spent that Thursday night in Farmville. On the next mornFarmville. On the next morning (Friday) I took my ten men and marched towards the county bridge that crosses the Appomattox, not far from Farmville. I met General PendFarmville. I met General Pendleton on the eastern side of the bridge and inquired for Haskell's battalion. He told me that it was coming on, and in a short time I met Cond showed no sign of any discomfiture whatever. The fight near Farmville. We were now about a quarter of a mile from Farmville, and we Farmville, and we marched about a mile farther on the road to Appomattox. I now saw a section of artillery—that is, two guns of the Second Rockbridge Battery—
High Bridge (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.26
o Paineville was a Yankee scout in disguise. Sergeant James F. Wood, of Lampkin's battery, saw him, after he was captured in the affair with the Yankees, and said he was undoubtedly one of them. A sight of General Lee. I told the men to supply themselves with rations out of the cut clown and broken up wagons which the Yankees had left near Flat Creek, and we had a plenty of raw provisions for the time being. We marched on together, crossing Appomattox River on a ferryboat near High Bridge, and got to Farmville on Thursday evening. Our rations had now given out, but a Confederate commissary at Farmville gave us a new supply, which lasted us to the end. We spent that Thursday night in Farmville. On the next morning (Friday) I took my ten men and marched towards the county bridge that crosses the Appomattox, not far from Farmville. I met General Pendleton on the eastern side of the bridge and inquired for Haskell's battalion. He told me that it was coming on, and in a sh
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