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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
e Yankees in a way that did credit to old Jube Early's one-time law partner, and handsome Ocey White, the boy lieutenant of Company A, taking off his hat to show me where a ball had raised a whelk on his scalp and carried away one of his pretty flaxen curls, and lastly, Old Buck Terry, with a peculiarly sad smile on his face, standing with poor George and Val Harris and others, between the colors of the Eleventh and Twenty-fourth, near where now is the pretty monument of Colonel Ward, of Massachusetts. I could not hear what he said, but he was pointing rearwards with his sword, and I knew what that meant. As I gave one hurried glance over the field we had traversed, the thought in my mind was repeated at my side, Oh! Colonel, why don't they support us? It was Walker, General Kemper's orderly, unhorsed, but still unscathed and undaunted, awkward, ungainly, hard-featured, good-natured, simple-minded, stouthearted Walker, one of the Eleventh boys, I believe; only a private doing hi
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
Pickett's charge at Gettysburg. From the Times-dispatch, May 6, 1906. Graphic story told by late Colonel Joseph C. Mayo, Third Virginia Regiment. Why Don't they support Us—why the unknown private beyond had to be killed that day. Richmond, Va., April 24, 1906. Editor of The Times-Dispatch: Sir,—I send you an account of Gettysburg by the late Col. Joseph Mayo, of the Third Virginia Infantry, Kemper's brigade. This gallant officer was a Virginia Military Institute man, and like every other field officer of Pickett's division, without a single exception, he was stricken in the dreadful assault. It has sometimes been said that all of Pickett's field officers were wounded except Major Joseph C. Cabell, of Danville. This is a mistake. He also was shot in the charge, though not severely. It was stated that Col. Eppa Hunton, of the Eighth Virginia Infantry, Garnett's brigade, rode his horse throughout the action until both he and his horse were shot. Having his
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
e river. His surviving comrades will read with interest the story of their deeds from his pen. Very truly yours, Jno. W. Daniel. Pickett's charge at Gettysburg. The order of march into the enemy's country was left in front; first Ewell's, then Hill's, and, lastly, Longstreet's corps, of which Armistead's, Garnett's and Kemper's brigades of Pickett's Division, brought up the rear. The other two brigades, those of Corse and Jenkins, were absent on detached service. We reached Chambersburg early on the evening of June 27th, and stayed there until hastily summoned to the scene of hostilities on the morning of the 2d of July, having been employed in the meantime, in tearing up the railroad track and demolishing the depot and other buildings. A forced march of twentyfive miles brought us, at about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, to the stone bridge on the Cashtown and Gettysburg Turnpike, within cannon shot of the battle-field. Here General Pickett sent Col. Walter Harrison, of
Danville (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
ay. Richmond, Va., April 24, 1906. Editor of The Times-Dispatch: Sir,—I send you an account of Gettysburg by the late Col. Joseph Mayo, of the Third Virginia Infantry, Kemper's brigade. This gallant officer was a Virginia Military Institute man, and like every other field officer of Pickett's division, without a single exception, he was stricken in the dreadful assault. It has sometimes been said that all of Pickett's field officers were wounded except Major Joseph C. Cabell, of Danville. This is a mistake. He also was shot in the charge, though not severely. It was stated that Col. Eppa Hunton, of the Eighth Virginia Infantry, Garnett's brigade, rode his horse throughout the action until both he and his horse were shot. Having his painful wound attended, he turned to ride forward again when his horse fell dead. The account is a graphic one and bears the impress of truth. Col. J. B. Bachelder, in his account of Gettysburg, states that Pickett's men chased the en
Waterloo, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
Unknown private who fell beyond. Twenty paces beyond the spot which is marked to tell where stout old Armistead fell, the foremost hero of them all, an humble private, without a name, bit the dust. The man in blue who told the story had a seam in his cheek. I tried to save him, but he would not give up, so I had to kill him to save my own life. What orders do you leave us, my lord, if you are killed? asked Hill of Wellington when the pounding was hardest on the famous plateau at Waterloo. Do as I am doing, he replied, and turning to the men, he said, Boys, you can't think of giving away. Remember old England. And well it was for old England that behind the Iron Duke was a wall of iron men. Calling to the group around me to spread themselves, I led the way back to the woods in rear of our guns on Seminary Ridge. Realizing painfully our own sad plight, we were, of course, anxiously concerned for the rest of our people. But soon Mars Robert came along, followed by his fai
Seminary Ridge (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
the, line, our march being carefully concealed from the enemy's view. Soon after we got into position, some two hundred yards in the rear of the batteries on Seminary Ridge, General Lee passed in front of us, coming from the right, and a little while afterwards every man in the ranks was made to know exactly what was the work whi interval with General Garnett; Armistead was expected to catch up and extend the line on the left. Then we swept onward again, straight for the Golgotha of Seminary Ridge, half a mile distant, across the open plain. As we neared the Emmettsburg road, along which, behind piles of rails, the enemy's strong line of skimishers was that behind the Iron Duke was a wall of iron men. Calling to the group around me to spread themselves, I led the way back to the woods in rear of our guns on Seminary Ridge. Realizing painfully our own sad plight, we were, of course, anxiously concerned for the rest of our people. But soon Mars Robert came along, followed by hi
Mars Robert (search for this): chapter 1.36
a good joke he had on our dashing and debonair chief of artillery. He had ridden out on the skirmish line to get a closer observation of the enemy's position, when a courier galloped up with a message from General Lee. Naturally he supposed Mars Robert wished to ask him what he had seen of those people that was worth reporting; but he was woefully mistaken. This was all the General had to say: Major Dearing, I do not approve of young officers needlessly exposing themselves; your place is wi Calling to the group around me to spread themselves, I led the way back to the woods in rear of our guns on Seminary Ridge. Realizing painfully our own sad plight, we were, of course, anxiously concerned for the rest of our people. But soon Mars Robert came along, followed by his faithful aides, the two Charleses-Venable and Marshall. How ineffably grand he appeared — a very anointed king of command, posing for the chisel of a Phidias, and looking on him we knew that the army was safe. S
ne and blessing the Yankees in a way that did credit to old Jube Early's one-time law partner, and handsome Ocey White, the boy lieutenant of Company A, taking off his hat to show me where a ball had raised a whelk on his scalp and carried away one of his pretty flaxen curls, and lastly, Old Buck Terry, with a peculiarly sad smile on his face, standing with poor George and Val Harris and others, between the colors of the Eleventh and Twenty-fourth, near where now is the pretty monument of Colonel Ward, of Massachusetts. I could not hear what he said, but he was pointing rearwards with his sword, and I knew what that meant. As I gave one hurried glance over the field we had traversed, the thought in my mind was repeated at my side, Oh! Colonel, why don't they support us? It was Walker, General Kemper's orderly, unhorsed, but still unscathed and undaunted, awkward, ungainly, hard-featured, good-natured, simple-minded, stouthearted Walker, one of the Eleventh boys, I believe; only a
His surviving comrades will read with interest the story of their deeds from his pen. Very truly yours, Jno. W. Daniel. Pickett's charge at Gettysburg. The order of march into the enemy's country was left in front; first Ewell's, then Hill's, and, lastly, Longstreet's corps, of which Armistead's, Garnett's and Kemper's brigades of Pickett's Division, brought up the rear. The other two brigades, those of Corse and Jenkins, were absent on detached service. We reached Chambersburg ea without a name, bit the dust. The man in blue who told the story had a seam in his cheek. I tried to save him, but he would not give up, so I had to kill him to save my own life. What orders do you leave us, my lord, if you are killed? asked Hill of Wellington when the pounding was hardest on the famous plateau at Waterloo. Do as I am doing, he replied, and turning to the men, he said, Boys, you can't think of giving away. Remember old England. And well it was for old England that behin
ating him on being able to be with his men (he had been seriously ill a few days before), I heard some one calling to me, and turning my head, saw that it was Captain Fry. He was mounted, and blood was streaming from his horse's neck. Colonel Terry had sent him to stop the rush to left. The enemy in force (Standard's Vermonters) had penetrated to our rear. He told me that Kemper had been struck down, it was feared mortally. With the help of Colonel Carrington, of the Eighteenth, and Major Bentley, of the Twenty-fourth, I hastily gathered a small band together and faced them to meet the new danger. After that everything was a wild kaleidoscopic whirl. A man near me seemed to be keeping a tally of the dead for my especial benefit. First it was Patton, then Collcote, then Phillips, and I know not how many more. Colonel Williams was knocked out the saddle by a ball in the shoulder near the brick-house, and in falling was killed by his sword. His little bay mare kept on with the
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