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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.37
han 75 per cent.—a larger relative increase than either. Chicago, New York, Boston, St. Louis, San Francisco, or any other large city in the North or West. From 1900 to 1905 there was an increase in the value of manufactured products in the whole United States of 29 per cent. The increase of manufactured products in the State of Georgia for the same period was 60 per cent., or larger than in any other State in the Union east of the Rockies, except the Southern States of North Carolina, Louisiana and Texas, where the growth in manufactures was about the same as in Georgia. The capital engaged in manufacturing in Georgia for 1906 shows the astonishing increase in six years of 70 per cent. As rapidly as their resources have permitted it, the Southern States have looked to the increase of educational facilities and the multiplication of the common schools. The figures show that the expenditures for public schools in 1870-71 in the sixteen former slave States and the District of C
Brazil, Clay County, Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.37
her borders every product which is grown to any important commercial extent in any other part of the United States, while our Southern States taken together can grow anything produced elsewhere in the entire world—the tea of China, the coffee of Brazil, the indigo and rubber of Africa, the wine of France, the olives of Italy, or the cedars of Lebanon. No nation on earth has a product for export approximating the value of our cotton. It brings to us five times as much as coffee carries to BrazBrazil, and five times as much as tea and silk combined bring to China. In fact, the total value of all the tea and silk exported from the Chinese empire is not quite sufficient to pay China's bill for the manufactured cotton goods which she imports. The Secretary of Agriculture, in his report to Congress a few weeks ago, made the declaration that the National welfare has been promoted by a few revolutions in agriculture and economics to the extent that it has been, and will be, promoted by t
Rocky Mountains (search for this): chapter 1.37
of Atlanta's manufacturing establishments increased more than 75 per cent.—a larger relative increase than either. Chicago, New York, Boston, St. Louis, San Francisco, or any other large city in the North or West. From 1900 to 1905 there was an increase in the value of manufactured products in the whole United States of 29 per cent. The increase of manufactured products in the State of Georgia for the same period was 60 per cent., or larger than in any other State in the Union east of the Rockies, except the Southern States of North Carolina, Louisiana and Texas, where the growth in manufactures was about the same as in Georgia. The capital engaged in manufacturing in Georgia for 1906 shows the astonishing increase in six years of 70 per cent. As rapidly as their resources have permitted it, the Southern States have looked to the increase of educational facilities and the multiplication of the common schools. The figures show that the expenditures for public schools in 1870-7
France (France) (search for this): chapter 1.37
ast year three times as much, or two thousand million dollars—an increase over 1890 of more than 60 per cent. It is said, and I believe correctly, that your own State of Georgia can raise within her borders every product which is grown to any important commercial extent in any other part of the United States, while our Southern States taken together can grow anything produced elsewhere in the entire world—the tea of China, the coffee of Brazil, the indigo and rubber of Africa, the wine of France, the olives of Italy, or the cedars of Lebanon. No nation on earth has a product for export approximating the value of our cotton. It brings to us five times as much as coffee carries to Brazil, and five times as much as tea and silk combined bring to China. In fact, the total value of all the tea and silk exported from the Chinese empire is not quite sufficient to pay China's bill for the manufactured cotton goods which she imports. The Secretary of Agriculture, in his report to Co
Hamburg, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.37
ll be, promoted by ten cent cotton. The greater part of the cotton planters are out of their former bondage to future maintenances, and they are paying no enormous rates of interest for advancements-rates which we estimated fifteen years ago to average 40 per cent. a year. The products of our forests have grown from nine and thirty millions in 1880 to more than $250,000,000 last year. Southern forests are now the country's main reservoirs of timber, and, as I have stood on the docks at Hamburg, I have seen navies of merchantmen arriving loaded down with the timber which our Southern lumbermen were exchanging for the foreigner's gold. Our plains and pastures and the blue grass meadows of Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee can raise cattle enough to supply tile continent. From the mines and quarries of our hillsides and mountains were extracted last year $260,000,000 in value against $20,000,000 in 1880, 1200 per cent. increase in mining, the results in 1905 in the South being th
China (China) (search for this): chapter 1.37
en together can grow anything produced elsewhere in the entire world—the tea of China, the coffee of Brazil, the indigo and rubber of Africa, the wine of France, thefee carries to Brazil, and five times as much as tea and silk combined bring to China. In fact, the total value of all the tea and silk exported from the ChineseChinese empire is not quite sufficient to pay China's bill for the manufactured cotton goods which she imports. The Secretary of Agriculture, in his report to Congress a China's bill for the manufactured cotton goods which she imports. The Secretary of Agriculture, in his report to Congress a few weeks ago, made the declaration that the National welfare has been promoted by a few revolutions in agriculture and economics to the extent that it has been, andf cotton cloth, or enough to furnish a suit of clothing to each of 100,000,000 Chinese, or other Orientals, at seven yards per capita. The mighty development in t sent them manufactured products valued at $1,723,000. In 1906 our shipments to China aggregated $29,814,075. The diversification of Southern manufacturing intere
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.37
be Lee's soldiers. They bore home with them his pure courage, his deathless faith, his calm but indomitable determination that for the South defeat should not meam despair, and disppointment should not bring with it ruin and obliteration. At Spotsylvania the Texans sent Lee to the rear, and by the power of their love for Lee burst through smoke and with bullets crowding the air swept over tangled field of the wilderness. Lee was sent to the rear at Appomattox, but Lee's men and Lee's woman hatten by lions of lions' mates. Sturdily, steadily, patiently and fearlessly as Lee's people pressed up the hill and broke through the smoke clouds on the heights of Gettysburg, as they burst through the wilderness thickness to the salient at Spotsylvania, as they followed to the gloomy glory of Appomattox, Lee's people have pressed and striven and climbed from Appomattox to and now are through the clouds and toward the crest, in the full glow of the light, marching abreast with those who were
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.37
results in 1905 in the South being three times as great as from all the mines and quarries in New England. In foreign commerce against exports of $261,000,000 from Southern ports in 1880, we find as many as we had in 1890, and twice as many as we had in 1900, six years ago. In 1880 the New England States consumed in their cotton mills six times as much cotton as the cotton-growing States. In 1906 the cotton-growing States had not only caught up with New England in the manufacture of raw cotton, but the Southern mills actually manufactured 15 per cent. more cotton than all the mills in the New England States combined. In other words, the Southern mills are now manufacturing approximately as much cotton as was manufactured in all the States of the Union as late as 1890. The cos increased 18 per cent. The increase, however, in the Eastern and Northern States, including New England, New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, was more than twice the average, or 43 per cent., aga
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.37
Advance from Appomattox. From the Richmond News-leader, January 21, 1907. John Skelton Willh. The address follows: Our advance from Appomattox. General Lee was one of the few men who hthe wilderness. Lee was sent to the rear at Appomattox, but Lee's men and Lee's woman have come steecitation of the results of our advance from Appomattox. We have overcome obstacles set thick and ds. Yet, it is now scarcely forty years from Appomattox, and the South has regained all her losses ania, as they followed to the gloomy glory of Appomattox, Lee's people have pressed and striven and climbed from Appomattox to and now are through the clouds and toward the crest, in the full glow of tbeen Grant instead of Lee who surrendered at Appomattox, we of the South probably would have erred ioo, have done our patient part by him. Since Appomattox the Southern white man has spent, as nearly the only right of the States surrendered at Appomattox. The other rights promised by the Constitut[1 more...]
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.37
ld be the least of all affected by such conditions would be the Southern people. On their own soil they can raise every other crop which they may need to supply them with food or vesture, and funds for living quite as easily as the farmers of Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana or Illinois, who, with an abundance of corn and wheat and wool, have never yet raised, or attempted to raise, a pound of cotton. The people of Great Britain know all this. They are well aware of the fearful losses, is going there in numbers accelerating every year. From 1890 to 900 the negro population of the United States increased 18 per cent. The increase, however, in the Eastern and Northern States, including New England, New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, was more than twice the average, or 43 per cent., against an average increase in the sixteen Southern States of 16 1/2 per cent., and against an increase for the same period in the States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin
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