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Thomasville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
ight miles of the town. Arriving there, we drew rations of flour, rice, ham, salt for three days, which we had cooked by paying a pair of shoes. We slept in the car at night and enjoyed ourselves very well. 5th. This morning a detachment of Yankee soldiers entered the town for the purpose of taking charge of it. Very shortly after, a division or so of Confederate troops passed through the place with colors flying and bands playing. We left Salisbury at 11 A. M., and passing through Thomasville, High Point, Jamestown, and arrived at Greensboro about 4 P. M. When we arrived at Greensboro, we were informed by Colonel John W. Reily, A. A. G., that it would be necessary for us to obtain our parole here, as Yankee guards would be upon the trains, and would demand our papers. In order to avoid future trouble, he advised us to obtain them here. In obedience to his counsel, we waited upon Captain I. L. Don, Provost Marshal, who furnished us with Paroles. There are quite a number of Ya
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
d; Willie H. Page, Richmond; Bird G. Pollard, King William; W. P. Gretter, Richmond; O. A. Mosby, Louisa courthouse; Harry C. Townsend, Richmond; James S. Carter. These having elected E. G. Steane as their leader struck out in the directionof James river, intending to cross that and place it between them and the Yankees, purposing thereafter to make for the Blue Ridge Mountains and travel down to North Carolina. After marching through the woods about four miles we halted for the night in an e to get some from another spring which was more palatable. 13th. Left Buffalo Springs this morning about 9 o'clock, and shortly after came to a Dr. Smith's, about two miles distant. Here the roads forked, one going to Rope Ferry across the James river, and the other leading over the Blue Ridge Mountains Robinson Gap. This caused quite a division of sentiment in our party, one side being in favor of taking the Rope Ferry road, and the other inclining to the Gap road. At one time permanent
Hamptonville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
tement, they had been disbanded and told to go home and give up the struggle, as we were going back into the Union. There were reports that not only the troops of the State, but the whole army of General Johnston is being thus disbanded. We have heard this report all along the road from Virginia to this place, but do not intend to accept it as a fixed fact until we obtain some more reliable testimony. When about seven and a half miles from Yadkinsville, we reached the small village of Hamptonville, and passed from that point to Eagle Mills, about the same distance beyond. Here we obtained dinner. Passing on thence, we arrived at Olin near sunset, and obtained accommodations for the night at the houses of Mr. Fulcher, Mr. Word, and another. This is one of the neatest villages we have met upon our route, and contains about two hundred inhabitants. Most of the residents are descendants of Virginia families, and the place reminds me very forcibly of some of the homes in the Old Dom
Yadkin (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
allowed to furnish sleeping accommodations to a stranger within the same house in which any of their family or sect are sleeping. No man, however wealthy, is allowed to be without a daily occupation. They seem to be an honest, industrious, sober minded, intelligent people. At Salem they have a Female Institute in progress, which is said to be the finest conducted of its class in the South. We slept in a very neat little school house, and ate at different houses. 26th. Crossed the Yadkin River today at Glenn's Ferry, about nine miles from Bethania and marched on to Yadkinsville, fifteen miles distant. After passing the river about two miles, we reached the residence of Mr. Glenn, a most beautiful place. Here we obtained three canteens full of sorghum beer, which was very little more than sweetened water; it was, however, quite cooling and refreshing. We obtained dinner when within eight miles of Yadkinsville, and then continued on our way. When nearly a mile north of the town
Buck Island Pond (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
f defence, but determined to put on a bold front and take the risks. Either because the size of our party intimidated them or because they imagined that a body of men that were bold enough to march through this country which had for so long a time been a terror to all travellers must also be a very troublesome set in a fight, or because they had been too much scattered by the recent defeat which they had sustained, we were not molested on our journey. At about 12 o'clock we arrived at Buck Island Pond on Dan river, which is a rapid rocky stream at that point. Here several of the party waded across the water, being in no place more than two and a half feet deep, and finding a boat upon the other side and a good place above the ford to ferry it started for the remainder of the boys. All of them were gotten over without accident or adventure until the last boat full. For this Todd volunteered to act as ferryman, and in one of his fits of mischief nearly succeeded in carrying the boat
North Fork Smith River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
&c. Here we remained all the afternoon, receiving excellent fare and meeting with good treatment. At night Mr. Galloway put us into nice feather beds which caused us to forget all our weariness very quickly. At Mr. Leftwich's also the other party were treated very hospitably and found very good fare. 21st. After a good breakfast at Mr. Galloway's and Mr. Leftwich's our party took up the line of march about 7 A. M., Mr. Galloway directed us to reach Mr. Harrison on the south side of Smith river, which was according to his statement about twenty miles distant. Our route for some six miles passed through a dense strip of woods; at length we reached a piece of open country and soon arrived at the house of a Mrs. Wade where we were told that Smith river was twenty-three miles distant. Here we crossed a river of quite respectable size, the name of which we did not learn; having passed on about a mile beyond this river we were told that Smith river was fifteen or twenty miles distan
Eagle Mills (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
go home and give up the struggle, as we were going back into the Union. There were reports that not only the troops of the State, but the whole army of General Johnston is being thus disbanded. We have heard this report all along the road from Virginia to this place, but do not intend to accept it as a fixed fact until we obtain some more reliable testimony. When about seven and a half miles from Yadkinsville, we reached the small village of Hamptonville, and passed from that point to Eagle Mills, about the same distance beyond. Here we obtained dinner. Passing on thence, we arrived at Olin near sunset, and obtained accommodations for the night at the houses of Mr. Fulcher, Mr. Word, and another. This is one of the neatest villages we have met upon our route, and contains about two hundred inhabitants. Most of the residents are descendants of Virginia families, and the place reminds me very forcibly of some of the homes in the Old Dominion. The people resemble Virginians more
Burkeville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
Yankee celebrated this day with a great many salutes, as usual; very pleasant weather. General Pendleton was here to-day, and says that furloughs have been stopped, and that we may expect a fight very soon. Captain P. says that it is supposed that Grant will attempt to open communication with Sherman. Wrote to the Examiner. 23rd. Disturbed by rumor and report of the movement of troops, and the evacuation of Petersburg. It is supposed that these troops are going in the direction of Burkeville or Danville. 24th. Received orders today to hold ourselves in readiness to move at a moment's warning. 25th. Expecting to receive orders to move. Rodes' (now Grymes') Division, was taken from our front today and carried to the right. General Pickett extended his lines so as to cover our front, in addition to his former front. 26-28th. No orders to move as yet. This is owing to the rainy weather, which has prevailed during this time, I suppose. March 1-8th. All quiet. Unp
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
road, we found an immense quantity of artillery and wagons, which shortly after commenced marching in the direction of Lynchburg. After travelling that road a short distance, we were ordered to countermarch and take a by-path, which led, I know not as meaning only those who were present at the place of surrender. The former contended that it was our duty to go to Lynchburg and give ourselves up to the Yankee authorities, as we were by the terms of that order undoubtedly included in the surr However neither party being able to convince the other it was finally agreed to separate, nine taking the road towards Lynchburg (J. W. Barnes, W. T. Eustace, S. B. Ayres, T. E. Ayres, S. A. Mosby, J. W. Seay, James T. Carter, F. J. Barnes, Jr., W.rty, who immediately retraced their steps, and endeavored to rejoin our party. The other four continued their march to Lynchburg. This action grieved us a great deal, and somewhat surprised us. After an excellent breakfast at Dr. Arnold's, we star
Glenns Ferry (Idaho, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
eping accommodations to a stranger within the same house in which any of their family or sect are sleeping. No man, however wealthy, is allowed to be without a daily occupation. They seem to be an honest, industrious, sober minded, intelligent people. At Salem they have a Female Institute in progress, which is said to be the finest conducted of its class in the South. We slept in a very neat little school house, and ate at different houses. 26th. Crossed the Yadkin River today at Glenn's Ferry, about nine miles from Bethania and marched on to Yadkinsville, fifteen miles distant. After passing the river about two miles, we reached the residence of Mr. Glenn, a most beautiful place. Here we obtained three canteens full of sorghum beer, which was very little more than sweetened water; it was, however, quite cooling and refreshing. We obtained dinner when within eight miles of Yadkinsville, and then continued on our way. When nearly a mile north of the town, we left six of the b
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